Do You Eat Fruitcake During The Holidays?

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    Dec 22, 2015 4:21 AM GMT
    In the US fruitcake has become a bit of a joke, and allegedly no one likes it. And you're never supposed to give it as a gift, especially around Christmas. Something your elderly widowed great aunt gives you, that you quickly throw away when she leaves.

    But I happen to like it. I just bought some today, named after the small town of Claxton, Georgia where much of it is made. Fresh and quite good, It's one of my holiday guilty pleasures. So is egg nog, but I haven't had any since a single quart we shared at Thanksgiving. That stuff will put at least 5 pounds on me around Christmas, so I've abstained and continue to lose weight. icon_biggrin.gif

    I'm not sure about weight gain from fruitcake, but this may be the only one I buy. It used to be in the some of the cans of our old-style Army C-ration boxes, and many soldiers hated it. So it was a trade item, that I could swap with them for stuff I got in my own box that I hated. (C-rations were sorta like a grab bag, you usually wouldn't know what you were getting to eat until you opened the box you were issued)

    So what's your view on fruitcake? Or any of the other US holiday traditionals? I still love walnuts in the shell, that was a standard when I was a kid, but I never cared for candy canes and most other sweets. Except boxed chocolates are always welcome, but again, death to my weight watching, so I really can't indulge much anymore.
  • Webster666

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    Dec 22, 2015 5:55 AM GMT
    I love good fruit cake, but I don't know where to find it.
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    Dec 22, 2015 6:40 AM GMT
    Webster666 saidI love good fruit cake, but I don't know where to find it.


    Above
  • Farmboy8

    Posts: 88

    Dec 22, 2015 1:54 PM GMT
    I agree with you guys, but GOOD Fruitcake is brutal to find so I make my own....two variations. The more traditional type needs to "mature" so you make it well in advance and keep it soaking in cheesecloth soaked in brandy or rum. I use dried fruits rather than those funky candied fruit from the supermarket. Soak them in maple syrup, water and brandy to plump them up a bit. Happy to share my recipe. Enjoy the holidays you fellow Fruitcakes!!
  • IgnatiusReill...

    Posts: 158

    Dec 22, 2015 4:03 PM GMT
    The Trappist Monks of Gethsemane Abbey, Bardstown, KY make fabulous fruitcakes. A slice their cake and a glass of sherry, perfect.
  • LJay

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    Dec 22, 2015 4:51 PM GMT
    I usually end up buying one Claxton fruitcake a year just because. The one I really like is never found commercially and is much work to make and certainly needs soaking and aging, sometimes for years.

    I am also a plum pudding freak.

    Since I need none of this and it puts my sugar levels through the roof, I do a lot of reminiscing and not too much nibbling.
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    Dec 22, 2015 7:17 PM GMT
    Webster666 saidI love good fruit cake, but I don't know where to find it.

    http:/www.claxtonfruitcake.com

    From there click on their link to their online store. Amazon also sells it. I got ours in our local Publix supermarket, but stores that carry it on the shelf are difficult to predict. And some only do so during the holidays.
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    Dec 22, 2015 7:28 PM GMT
    Best fruit cake I ever had is locally made by Baker Maid Products and is called Creole Royale. It comes in a decorative tin and it is presliced with each slice individually wrapped. It is the most deliciously moist fruit cake I've ever eaten.

    Being that each slice is individually wrapped it could last forever but it doesn't because it's so delicious.

    http://www.bakermaid.com/products/holiday-items/creole-royal-fruit-cake/
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Dec 22, 2015 7:50 PM GMT
    IgnatiusReilly saidThe Trappist Monks of Gethsemane Abbey, Bardstown, KY make fabulous fruitcakes. A slice their cake and a glass of sherry, perfect.


    bingo
  • hottt1980

    Posts: 50

    Dec 22, 2015 11:59 PM GMT
    Hell yeah......I'm CRAVING it.....lol...About to lose my mind if I don't get it.......lol
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    Dec 23, 2015 12:57 AM GMT
    IgnatiusReilly saidThe Trappist Monks of Gethsemane Abbey, Bardstown, KY make fabulous fruitcakes. A slice their cake and a glass of sherry, perfect.

    What a wonderful suggestion! I just had some fruitcake (merely the Claxton, not what the monks make) with some cream sherry. Nice combo.

    I'd love to sample theirs. Do they ship it?

    And I thought of another little holiday treat I once loved, but more for cold weather with snow on the ground, I never think to make it here in South Florida. It's hot cocoa with peppermint schnapps.

    Made just like it says, plus you top it with heavy whipped cream, and use a candy cane to stir it. The cane more as a colorful festive garnish, that enhances the peppermint taste as it melts. I think some restaurants add a second liqueur, but schnapps is enough for me.

    I used to love those, especially when I was out braving the cold for Christmas shopping. Sometimes with lunch, but more often when I was done for the day, and having an early dinner at a relaxing restaurant. My dessert reward for a job well done before I headed home in temps well below zero F. LOL!
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    Dec 23, 2015 1:05 AM GMT
    I love my cake.....with fruits and loads of nuts!!

  • Dec 23, 2015 1:33 AM GMT
    Yup, love em. I buy a few as gifts every year. I find them at my local Big Lots for $8 - "Shirley Jean" brand - green box looks like they haven't updated the packaging since the 1970's.
    71UtvHKKHmL._SX355_.jpg

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    Dec 23, 2015 7:04 PM GMT
    Our family has ordered from the Collin Street Bakery in Corsicana, Texas, for decades. The bakery has been in business since 1896. It makes a tasty fruit cake.

    https://www.collinstreet.com

    Secret for serving: Use a very sharp, thin-bladed knife, and cut the slice very thin, like 1/8".
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    Dec 23, 2015 7:59 PM GMT
    StrangerinParadise saidYup, love em. I buy a few as gifts every year. I find them at my local Big Lots for $8 - "Shirley Jean" brand - green box looks like they haven't updated the packaging since the 1970's.
    71UtvHKKHmL._SX355_.jpg

    With Big Lots you never know; those cakes may be from the 1970s, found in some warehouse somewhere.
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    Dec 24, 2015 4:17 AM GMT
    Let's be frank about fruitcake. Okay, maybe your mom makes terrific fruitcake, and you eat two of them every year in the dark while listening to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir sing "Silent Night" and your eyes fill up with tears and this is the emotional highlight of your year. Fine. I'm not here to badmouth your mother's fruitcake. But --- she only makes a few fruitcakes a year, and that leaves the other thirty-two-point-seven million fruitcakes, and let me tell you about them. They're made in March and April in a gigantic factory in Indonesia, sent to the U.S. in the form of thirty-foot fruit logs that are then cut up and wrapped in cellophane, stored in surplus fruitcake silos in Iowa, delivered to stores, sold, and nobody eats them because they're inedible, so you keep it in the refrigerator for six months, and in July it's sent to a fruitcake disposal site in Utah and put into concrete canisters with millions of other fruitcakes and buried in the desert. (Those mountains around Salt Lake City where people go to ski are former fruitcake disposal sites.)
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    Dec 24, 2015 5:40 AM GMT
    Yes, my mom made the best fruitcake you could imagine. But it took her DAYS to make the darn things. She picked the fruit and the nuts came from our pecan trees which had to be cracked and shelled. It was quite the ordeal but it wasn't Christmas with it. She would also make fruit cookies at the same time. That dense brick you see in the grocery stores has no relation to my mom's fruitcake in the least!
  • Cutlass

    Posts: 426

    Dec 24, 2015 10:15 AM GMT
    I think it's kind of an acquired taste. As a teenager I didn't like it that much, but I ate some. Then my sister's friend made some, and I got a taste of it, and wow! I was sold on fruitcake. She's a lot older now and doesn't make it anymore, but hers was the only fruitcake I liked.
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Dec 24, 2015 1:07 PM GMT
    It is traditional here in the UK as well as Christmas pudding. I can't get enough of it.
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    Dec 24, 2015 2:11 PM GMT
    Radd saidYes, my mom made the best fruitcake you could imagine. But it took her DAYS to make the darn things. She picked the fruit and the nuts came from our pecan trees which had to be cracked and shelled. It was quite the ordeal but it wasn't Christmas with[out] it. She would also make fruit cookies at the same time. That dense brick you see in the grocery stores has no relation to my mom's fruitcake in the least!

    What my husband has been making, along with preparing our Christmas Day dinner contribution to take over to a friend's place, is fruit candy. He calls it chocolate bark, fairly thin sheets of white or dark chocolate filled with small pieces of fruit (that I usually get the job of dicing up). He gift-boxes it and gives it to friends.

    But we don't have fruit trees to pick. And in chocolate the dried fruit works best, which he buys in stores, really as good as if we dried fresh fruit ourselves. It includes apricots, grapefruit, cranberries, oranges, raisins, I can hardly remember all the fruits he uses.

    Interesting to hear from several here that fruitcake has a tradition in the UK. Perhaps that's its origin, that we copied in the US.
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    Dec 24, 2015 4:07 PM GMT
    The key to good fruitcake is it should have fresh nuts in it, unless of course you're allergic to nuts. In that case it could make a nice last meal.
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    Dec 26, 2015 4:05 PM GMT
    My paternal grandmother, who was British, used to make an excellent fruit cake but she used both rum and gin to keep it moist.

    I really don't understand all the negativity associated with fruit cake. There are lots of other ethnic Christmas treats that seem rather non-plus you don't come from that background.

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    Dec 26, 2015 6:00 PM GMT
    Used to. Love it, if it is high quality (not the kind in supermarkets that could double as a football). Those made by various abbeys are great (but you have to watch out for the use of hydrogenated oils - some of these monks are still in the last century when it comes to healthy ingredients).

    Sadly, not anymore - too fattening.
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    Dec 26, 2015 6:44 PM GMT
    HikerSkier saidUsed to. Love it, if it is high quality (not the kind in supermarkets that could double as a football). Those made by various abbeys are great (but you have to watch out for the use of hydrogenated oils - some of these monks are still in the last century when it comes to healthy ingredients).

    Sadly, not anymore - too fattening.

    Well, I was afraid to step on our bathroom scale this morning, after the private Christmas dinner we attended yesterday. I've been doing pretty good in 2015, lost over 25 pounds since this Summer. I expected to gain a few pounds over the holidays, as usual, but so far it hasn't happened. Avoiding eggnog no doubt helped.

    I ate merely 1 fruitcake. A commonly available Claxton, not from monastaries or abbeys. But unusually fresh & moist, and very nice. Satisfied my holiday urge, I'll not have another.
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    Dec 27, 2015 3:02 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Too bad the rest of us that aren't as socially connected as you have to attend public Christmas dinners.

    Get over it, Mary. Private means with friends at their home, versus at a public or commercial place. Or perhaps you don't have any friends. You never mention them, or about having any social or gay life. In which case I can understand why you're envious and offer nasty remarks to others here instead.

    We brought a gay guy with us from a retirement village, who lives alone. He's 83, and we didn't want him to drive in the dark on his own going back to his place.

    We saw him for lunch today, and he said it was the best Christmas he's had in years. That alone was worth our effort of driving through heavy local Florida traffic about 10 miles to pick him up, and then taking him back home at night. I hate driving in the dark myself.

    My husband's widowed sister from Boca Raton was also there (I know, you're going to lecture us all again on the strict legal definition of marriage). It was a lovely gathering, and everyone brought something for the table, to eat or drink.

    My husband [ALERT] did stuffed calamari, and also meat lasagna. Our host did a ham, with pineapple rings, just like my family had when I was a kid. It was wonderfully nostalgic for me.

    So it was indeed a lovely Christmas, with family & friends. A private gathering, as I define it. And if that bothers you, go fuck yourself. icon_biggrin.gif