Our Gasoline Goes Below $2.00 a US Gallon - What About Your Own Area?

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    Dec 23, 2015 5:23 PM GMT
    It had recently gone below $2.00 at some convenience stores, that don't identify their gas source, but not the major brands previously. Now our local Texaco is $1.99, and a few others are at $1.97, including Shell, which is usually among the highest here.

    I'll fill the tank as soon as I finish lunch, at the Texaco I see right across the street from the restaurant. Where it was $2.03 when we drove past not 2 hours ago. The prices are just plummeting daily.

    We're right next to Fort Lauderdale, prices normally a bit high with the tourists, lots of out-of-staters and rental cars from the airports. How's your area doing? And guys in other countries? I wouldn't relate to liter per Euros and Pounds, but are you seeing big price declines there?
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    Dec 23, 2015 5:32 PM GMT
    Denver lowest $1.67/gal
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    Dec 23, 2015 5:33 PM GMT
    Shit, it's like $1.53.00 here.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 23, 2015 6:05 PM GMT
    I just filled up for $1.27/gallon using Kroger fuel points.
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    Dec 23, 2015 7:10 PM GMT
    Hasn't budged from $2.30, here, in months. Plus or minus a penny or two.
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    Dec 23, 2015 8:57 PM GMT
    Does anyone know how this will affect the price of hybrid and/or electric cars over the current and next model years? They say oil prices will continue to drop, and I seem to recall hearing from various sources that efficient vehicles were being sold at a premium when gas prices were high because screw you, someone else will buy it if you don't.

    I can't imagine prices staying this low forever, and when they rebound I would like to think I'll have a vehicle that uses less gas, but I'm pretty sure those vehicle prices will go up at the same time. But I've never been much of a car buyer so I don't have a very good frame of reference, and the news media don't really have much to say about it when gas prices aren't high.
  • HottJoe

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    Dec 23, 2015 9:13 PM GMT
    Gas always seems to be cheaper in the South. I wonder why that is.
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    Dec 23, 2015 9:20 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidGas always seems to be cheaper in the South. I wonder why that is.


    Proximity to the Gulf and the Texas refineries?

    Just a guess; I don't know that these make all that much difference.
  • HottJoe

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    Dec 23, 2015 9:28 PM GMT
    I can remember when gas 1.50 in my area... It was 1999.
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    Dec 23, 2015 9:34 PM GMT
    Looks like $2.60-2.80 here.

    I remember going to a wedding in Kansas City with the family in the early 90's; we were all amazed when we crossed the Missouri border and saw a sign for 98.9 cents per gallon. Apparently that's all it takes to impress Nebraskans; I think we talked about it for most of the remaining drive to the church.

    I'm such a hick.
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    Dec 23, 2015 9:55 PM GMT
    anotherphil said
    HottJoe saidGas always seems to be cheaper in the South. I wonder why that is.

    Proximity to the Gulf and the Texas refineries?

    Just a guess; I don't know that these make all that much difference.

    Louisiana and other Gulf States have refineries, too. But a big factor in different gas prices across the US is State taxes. Federal tax is uniform, but the States add taxes at the rates they choose, some higher than others.

    Oddly, it's mostly the Red States, whose politicians run on the platform of lower taxes for the rich, that have these higher regressive gasoline sales taxes that hit the working class hardest. A major exception is mostly Blue California, which uses gas taxes as one of the negative incentives to reduce private driving and thereby ease their unique smog problem, as well as lessen their horrendous road traffic congestion.
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    Dec 23, 2015 10:10 PM GMT

    I shop around the LA area. Best I found and my last fill up @ $2.55 (every where else is >= $2.60

    (CA is always at least <=$1.00 more than the rest of the country) icon_evil.gif

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    Dec 24, 2015 3:08 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    anotherphil said
    HottJoe saidGas always seems to be cheaper in the South. I wonder why that is.

    Proximity to the Gulf and the Texas refineries?

    Just a guess; I don't know that these make all that much difference.

    Louisiana and other Gulf States have refineries, too. But a big factor in different gas prices across the US is State taxes. Federal tax is uniform, but the States add taxes at the rates they choose, some higher than others.

    Oddly, it's mostly the Red States, whose politicians run on the platform of lower taxes for the rich, that have these higher regressive gasoline sales taxes that hit the working class hardest. A major exception is Blue California, which uses gas taxes as one of the negative incentives to reduce private driving and thereby ease their unique smog problem, as well as lessen their horrendous road traffic congestion.


    I've been out and about all day, but I've been puzzling over this the whole time (not much better to do when mindlessly picking the path of least resistance through a holiday crowd).

    I found a site with some maps which don't give much context but are still interesting:

    http://www.api.org/Oil-and-Natural-Gas-Overview/Industry-Economics/Fuel-Taxes/Gasoline-Tax

    I can't speak for most of this map, but Iowa was lamenting its "low" gas taxes just before I moved to California; interesting given that they show up on the high end. Maybe they passed the increase already since I left.

    There does seem to be some overlap between low taxes and refinery concentration (at least Texas and Louisiana line up):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_oil_refineries

    Anyway, not many explanations, but interesting trivia...
  • mybud

    Posts: 11832

    Dec 24, 2015 3:08 AM GMT
    $1.52
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Dec 24, 2015 4:12 AM GMT
    $1.51 this morning at the local New Orleans area Wally-Mart, without the use of any discount cards.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 24, 2015 4:15 AM GMT
    $2.50 in LA icon_mad.gif
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    Dec 24, 2015 5:38 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    anotherphil said
    HottJoe saidGas always seems to be cheaper in the South. I wonder why that is.

    Proximity to the Gulf and the Texas refineries?

    Just a guess; I don't know that these make all that much difference.

    Louisiana and other Gulf States have refineries, too. But a big factor in different gas prices across the US is State taxes. Federal tax is uniform, but the States add taxes at the rates they choose, some higher than others.

    Oddly, it's mostly the Red States, whose politicians run on the platform of lower taxes for the rich, that have these higher regressive gasoline sales taxes that hit the working class hardest. A major exception is mostly Blue California, which uses gas taxes as one of the negative incentives to reduce private driving and thereby ease their unique smog problem, as well as lessen their horrendous road traffic congestion.



    Not so oddly, you're wrong, again.

    http://taxfoundation.org/blog/map-state-gasoline-tax-rates-2014

  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Dec 24, 2015 5:41 AM GMT
    Ever since I purchased my beloved Lincoln Town Car 17 months ago; gasoline has slowly but steadily dropped in price.



    icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 24, 2015 5:42 AM GMT
    rnch saidEver since I purchased my beloved Lincoln Town Car 17 months ago; gasoline has slowly but steadily dropped in price.



    icon_biggrin.gif


    That really doesn't do so badly though. You probably average 18 and your Yoda around 20-21. The real world difference isn't quite as much as folks think.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Dec 24, 2015 5:50 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    rnch saidEver since I purchased my beloved Lincoln Town Car 17 months ago; gasoline has slowly but steadily dropped in price.



    icon_biggrin.gif


    That really doesn't do so badly though. You probably average 18 and your Yoda around 20-21. The real world difference isn't quite as much as folks think.





    Esp since I accepted Early Out from out favorite Uncle this week and am not driving the 60 to 80 miles a day to/from work that used to do.

    The Town Car gets an indicated 22-24 (by the car's computer) at 70 mph, the Camry got 29 to 31 mpg at the same speed.

    Small change trade off for me; quite acceptable.
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    Dec 24, 2015 5:57 AM GMT
    rnch said
    freedomisntfree said
    rnch saidEver since I purchased my beloved Lincoln Town Car 17 months ago; gasoline has slowly but steadily dropped in price.



    icon_biggrin.gif


    That really doesn't do so badly though. You probably average 18 and your Yoda around 20-21. The real world difference isn't quite as much as folks think.





    Esp since I accepted Early Out from out favorite Uncle this week and am not driving the 60 to 80 miles a day to/from work that used to do.

    The Town Car gets an indicated 22-24 (by the car's computer) at 70 mph, the Camry got 29 to 31 mpg at the same speed.

    Small change trade off for me; quite acceptable.


    I meant to say city driving. 70 or so would be the speed where the Yoda would have the biggest advantage.

    In Los Angeles 'city' driving mean which idles most efficiently. My 3.6 Saturn Aura got around 10 mpg and the G8 12 mpg with an engine almost twice as large. At 70 -75 the Saturn had a 6 mpg advantage and as speeds got up around 100 MPH then advantage moved back to the G8.

    I've done cross country trips in both cars and average mileage was about the same .... in the 23.6 to 23.9 range. Top speed limiters were programmed out in both cars and I did quite a bit of really fast driving.
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    Dec 24, 2015 6:37 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    anotherphil said
    HottJoe saidGas always seems to be cheaper in the South. I wonder why that is.

    Proximity to the Gulf and the Texas refineries?

    Just a guess; I don't know that these make all that much difference.

    Louisiana and other Gulf States have refineries, too. But a big factor in different gas prices across the US is State taxes. Federal tax is uniform, but the States add taxes at the rates they choose, some higher than others.

    Oddly, it's mostly the Red States, whose politicians run on the platform of lower taxes for the rich, that have these higher regressive gasoline sales taxes that hit the working class hardest. A major exception is mostly Blue California, which uses gas taxes as one of the negative incentives to reduce private driving and thereby ease their unique smog problem, as well as lessen their horrendous road traffic congestion.


    Seems like the working class is getting hit hard in the "blue" areas and hit less hard in "red" areas...

    2n9yky1.jpg
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    Dec 24, 2015 4:08 PM GMT
    I put $2.50 for LA yesterday which was wrong. I saw $2.89 just this morning and this is one of the cheaper stations.icon_mad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 24, 2015 7:28 PM GMT
    is gas what you use in ovens and central heating? aren't you all talking about petrol?
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    Dec 24, 2015 8:43 PM GMT
    bonaparts saidis gas what you use in ovens and central heating? aren't you all talking about petrol?


    In the US they call it "gas" which is a contraction for gasoline. In UK I believe the term is "petrol". To make it more confusing the stuff used for central heating is also called gas.