Academic Music, did you enjoy it?

  • Allegri

    Posts: 64

    Dec 26, 2015 5:12 PM GMT
    If theres musicians or people that enjoy hearing some of academic music (orchestal, instrumental, operas or some arias) put your favourites here.
    Im gonna start with a Russian one, Stravinsky!, le sacre du printemps.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UJOaGIhG7A
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    Dec 27, 2015 8:27 PM GMT
    Lamar654 saidIf theres musicians or people that enjoy hearing some of academic music (orchestal, instrumental, operas or some arias) put your favourites here.
    Im gonna start with a Russian one, Stravinsky!, le sacre du printemps.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UJOaGIhG7A


    "Academic" music? Really? WTF? Orchestral, instrumental music IS music. Full stop. Opera is arguably the epitome of a grand diverse cultural experience, in that it combines the language arts with melody with stagecraft with dance and thespianism, not to mention on occasion over-the-top special effects (anyone for live elephants and camels on a stage?), all wrapped up in beautiful orchestrations.

    Alas, what passes for the most part as popular music today is the result of the decline of musical education in the school system over the past fifty years.
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    Dec 27, 2015 8:28 PM GMT
    Radu Lupu anyone?
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    Dec 27, 2015 8:43 PM GMT
    My preference is to say "serious" music. Not classical, which is the common default for most people to use, because to me that's the music of a specific time period & type. Between the Baroque and Romantic periods. Not forgetting the Rococo of the late Baroque, if you wanna get really precise.

    But I'm not sure about "Academic" music, which seems to imply some kind of instructional or collegiate connection. And then there's the very mannered and formulaic Academic School of painting in the 1800s, which is something altogether different.

    So I'm just not sure about Academic music as a term I would use.

    And since providing some examples has been requested, here's one from the High Baroque. Handel's Water Music. In 1978 I had a 21-piece chamber orchestra play this from the choir loft for my bride's entrance, which she made just as the French horns sounded following the trumpets, because the horn was her personal instrument. Naturally the arrangement they used was shortened to match the time it took for her and her father to walk to the altar. Similar to the 3rd statement of the theme you hear in this recording.

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    Dec 27, 2015 9:14 PM GMT
    Bonifacius said
    Art_Deco saidMy tendency is to say "serious" music. Not classical, which is the common default for most people to use, because to me that's the music of a specific period. Between the Baroque and Romantic periods. Not forgetting the Rococo of the late Baroque, if you wanna really get precise.

    But I'm not sure about "Academic" music, which seems to imply some kind of instructional or collegiate connection. And then there's the Academic School of painting in the 1800s, which is something altogether different.

    So I'm just not sure about Academic music as a term I would use.


    another one


    You're from Estonia and you don't mention Arvo Part?

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    Dec 27, 2015 9:23 PM GMT
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    Dec 27, 2015 9:53 PM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    Academic Music?

    music_notation_rest_with_shut_up_tshirt-

  • Allegri

    Posts: 64

    Dec 28, 2015 12:59 AM GMT
    QUOTE AUTHOR GOES HERE]Art_Deco said[/cite]My tendency is to say "serious" music. Not classical, which is the common default for most people to use, because to me that's the music of a specific period. Between the Baroque and Romantic periods. Not forgetting the Rococo of the late Baroque, if you wanna really get precise.

    But I'm not sure about "Academic" music, which seems to imply some kind of instructional or collegiate connection. And then there's the Academic School of painting in the 1800s, which is something altogether different.

    So I'm just not sure about Academic music as a term I would use.


    Mmmmm, saying that is kind of elitist in an artistic way, well, I agree with you that "classical" is not the right term for calling music that is a part of canon, classical or neoclassical its a period of art that starts in 1750, some classical musicians are Mozart or Haydn.

    Theres some serious music that is not part of the academy and its still being SERIOUS, like progressive rock or some kind of jazz pieces, and still being hard to play and got high composition standarts, when I say "academic music", I say music that is part from a music CANON, like Ravel, Stravinsky, Palestrina, Schumann, Buxtejude or Bach. Theres American (colonial) baroque, that is not part of the occidental canon, and still being baroque, academic and SERIOUS music (just search Gaspar Fernandes, Tomas de Torrejón y Velasco), and they was BIG musicians. So, I do not agree with you, when you say that its better to calling "serious music".



  • Allegri

    Posts: 64

    Dec 28, 2015 1:09 AM GMT
    Well, this is one of my favorite baroque arias, Handel was a master in vocal agilities, and Julia Lezheneva is THE soprano.

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    Dec 28, 2015 3:08 AM GMT
    ^stunning.

    Listening for a third time as I type this. Isn't she something! My vocal cords are exhausted just from listening.

    Here, try this https://youtu.be/W2oizt0K8Is?t=4m21s
    better, right?
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    Dec 28, 2015 4:54 AM GMT
    I had not heard of the concept of "academic" music before. What comes to mind are John Cage and Milton Babbitt, whose music is highly theoretical and which I can't stand. I would not put Stravinsky in the same category.

    The only "academic" music I enjoy is the Academic Festival Overture.
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    Dec 28, 2015 5:18 AM GMT


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    Dec 28, 2015 5:21 AM GMT

  • Allegri

    Posts: 64

    Dec 28, 2015 5:24 AM GMT
    HikerSkier saidI had not heard of the concept of "academic" music before. What comes to mind are John Cage and Milton Babbitt, whose music is highly theoretical and which I can't stand. I would not put Stravinsky in the same category.

    The only "academic" music I enjoy is the Academic Festival Overture.


    Well thats how we call it in my music conservatory (Costa Rica), I dont know if theres a translate mistake by my part, but, if Im using the "wrong term", tell me whats the right term in english.

    Faure <3

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    Dec 28, 2015 5:40 AM GMT
    And when this one is not throwing a tirade at the audience, and not pelvic thrusting at his piano, he can be brilliant.



    Especially min 4:00 on
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    Dec 28, 2015 5:49 AM GMT
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_music

    Highly cultured

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    Dec 28, 2015 6:05 AM GMT

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    Dec 28, 2015 6:19 AM GMT
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    Dec 28, 2015 6:42 AM GMT
    For anyone interested in Part's works, almost all of them can be found on the ECM New Series on vinyl (earlier) and CD and iTunes (all of them). Plus, some of them on a much cheaper download site
    http://www.iomoio.com/index.html for 16 cents a cut or on sale once in a while for 10 cents a cut.



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    Dec 28, 2015 7:22 AM GMT
    Lamar654 saidIf theres musicians or people that enjoy hearing some of academic music (orchestal, instrumental, operas or some arias) put your favourites here.
    Im gonna start with a Russian one, Stravinsky!, le sacre du printemps.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UJOaGIhG7A


    That's a nice performance of the Rite of Spring.

    I heard this piece live many times with the favorite I think being just after high school so 1972 +/- at Blossom with Cleveland Symphony conducted by Lorin Maazel with the Pacific Ballet (on shrooms).

    This or maybe The Firebird are some of my favorite 'break-in pieces' I love to take newbies to for their first taste of classical music.
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    Dec 28, 2015 7:26 AM GMT
    October by Eric Whitacre is perhaps the most gorgeous instrumental piece I have ever heard.
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    Dec 28, 2015 7:32 AM GMT
    ^^^^

    Here's one you might like then



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    Dec 28, 2015 2:19 PM GMT
    Lamar654 saidWell, this is one of my favorite baroque arias, Handel was a master in vocal agilities, and Julia Lezheneva is THE soprano.


    Lovely, thanks. And it was fun watching the viola player behind her really getting into her performance.
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    Dec 28, 2015 11:56 PM GMT
    Lamar654 said
    HikerSkier saidI had not heard of the concept of "academic" music before. What comes to mind are John Cage and Milton Babbitt, whose music is highly theoretical and which I can't stand. I would not put Stravinsky in the same category.

    The only "academic" music I enjoy is the Academic Festival Overture.


    Well thats how we call it in my music conservatory (Costa Rica), I dont know if there's a translate mistake by my part, but, if Im using the "wrong term", tell me whats the right term in english.


    Didn't realize you were in another country. I don't know if there is a single "right" or "correct" term. Sounds like you are talking about "serious" music, which could encompass just about everything composed for serious listening - as opposed to "popular" music. I never studied at a conservatory, and don't know if academics have a word for it. Most people would probably just call it "classical music," - but that blurs the distinction between the classical period (of European music), and the prior renaissance and baroque periods, and subsequent romantic and various modern periods. In the USA, there are a few (not all that many) radio stations that play serious music. Everyone refers to them as "Classical" music stations.
  • Allegri

    Posts: 64

    Oct 14, 2016 4:48 AM GMT
    Hi again.