Countries That Haven't Adopted the Metric System

  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Dec 26, 2015 10:04 PM GMT
    Countries That Haven't Adopted the Metric System

    metric-system-map_0.png

    http://mentalfloss.com/article/55895/countries-havent-adopted-metric-system
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    Dec 26, 2015 10:19 PM GMT
    Actually the US has adopted metrics for many applications, just not "official" by law. Our cars are metric, except for things like wheel lug nuts ans spark plugs, and most of our factories have gone metric. Many of my hand tools are metric.

    What remains non-metric are the everyday things people use in their daily lives, that don't really affect international commerce. Like weights & measurements used in our homes, and temperature.

    And frankly, I find Celsius temperatures a coarser system, that lack the finer divisions of Fahrenheit. After all, in Celsius there are only 100 degree increments from the freezing temperature of water to boiling, whereas in Fahrenheit there are 180, almost double. For some uses I'll skip metric, thank you very much.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Dec 27, 2015 1:39 AM GMT
    Oddly, in Canada you still buy lumber in inches and feet and land is measured in acres. MY Volvo is bilingual though, and I can switch from miles to kilometers - a bit help when I'm in BC!
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3521

    Dec 27, 2015 1:44 AM GMT
    tazzari saidOddly, in Canada you still buy lumber in inches and feet and land is measured in acres. MY Volvo is bilingual though, and I can switch from miles to kilometers - a bit help when I'm in BC!


    they joys of being dependent on the export to america market. most of our products are actually in imperial still though, just labelled differently. 3.71L jugs and such. All the old familiar measurements just written in metric units.
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    Dec 27, 2015 2:36 AM GMT
    I picked this profession way before coming out of the closet. I thought I was going to be an architect once, I had all four years of drafting in high school. (Years later would discover my work is the basis of freemasonry). This subject probably sounds much boring to many gays here on RJ. As I have stated before, the S.T.E.M fields are still a bit too homophobic and any young, openly gay today contemplating this field should think twice, your lifestyle or your career. It certainly can be rewarding but troublesome if you are not prepared for your lifestyle backlash that comes with it, I wish it were different because Science is the shit icon_idea.gif



    Well, this is definitely one huge difference between Boeing planes and Airbus planes


    Knowing the metric system myself, I can tell you that tolerances during manufacturing and assembly are much tighter. A much tighter tolerance translates into a higher quality manufactured product.

    Because the metric system produces higher quality products, it is more expensive to use in manufacturing which might explain why, 1)European manufacturing is better and more expensive than American 2) US corporate American manufacturing are profit driven only and therefore, using the English unit measurement, relies less on quality, less on price and more on simplicity and the ability to cut corners when necessary 3) The decline and movement of US manufacturing jobs-base to Europe and Mexico as America once relied upon it but can no longer compete with the ISO tighter tolerances and its expense.



    As this is part of my work, the metric system applied tolerance is a bit different. Still used MIL-Standard is in a class by itself

    English Engineering tolerance
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engineering_tolerance

    Metric Tolerance Definitions
    http://www.engineeringessentials.com/ege/tol/tol_page6.htm

    United States Military Standard
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Military_Standard

    For example, due to differences in dimensional tolerances, in World War II American screws, bolts, and nuts did not fit British equipment properly and were not fully interchangeable.[2] Defense standards provide many benefits, such as minimizing the number of types of ammunition, ensuring compatibility of tools, and ensuring quality during production of military equipment. This results, for example, in ammunition and food cases that can be opened without tools; vehicle subsystems that can be quickly swapped into the place of damaged ones; and small arms and artillery that are less likely to find themselves with an excess of ammunition that does not fit and a lack of ammo that does.

    However, the proliferation of standards also has some drawbacks. The main one is that they impose what is functionally equivalent to a regulatory burden upon the defense supply chain, both within the military and across its civilian suppliers. Almost nothing can be done according to sound case-by-case judgment, and almost everything requires constant, extensive study of the rules and verification that they are being followed "to a T". Workflows frequently pause (causing snowballing schedule delays) for reasons that are sometimes essentially trivial, and unit costs rise.
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    Dec 27, 2015 11:12 AM GMT
    Coincidence?

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    Dec 27, 2015 2:00 PM GMT
    Who wants to get a half litre of beer?!? I'd much rather order a pint!
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    Dec 27, 2015 2:10 PM GMT
    So an article supporting use of the metric system as a measure of quality cannot properly identify US Territory.
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    Dec 27, 2015 2:25 PM GMT
    mx5guynj saidSo an article supporting use of the metric system as a measure of quality cannot properly identify US Territory.

    Interesting point. It omits the State of Hawaii, and the Territories of Puerto Rico and Guam. Or perhaps the Territories are metric, I don't know.

    But for international commerce the US IS metric. All my car's fasteners are metric, as far as I can see, and I still do some work on cars myself. Except, as I said in a post above, the wheel lug nuts and the spark plugs are in US inches. And the wheels and tires are kinda a mix. I suppose it has to do with the "installed base" or some such thing.
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    Dec 27, 2015 3:57 PM GMT
    its the same beer either way. You go from point A->B its the same distance too. If its cold; press UP button on the thermostat. Low math skills needed to over come a badness.


    Its a hassle; metric or SAE (SAE is the old British US standard). Unless you have a very detailed shop manual your not going to know which ones are SAE. If things go bad, you find a fastener way over tightened, you want everything going for you. Super important the socket fits just right and you have a short connection to the impact tool. With assemblies coming from so many diverse sources you can count on something not disassembling because of odd chemistry in the threads or no oem torque spec.

    3/4=19mm or 5/16=8mm correspond well but for most up to 1" you can count on things not matching. For fastener >1" seems they match up somehow.
    08mm ~ 5/16"
    10mm ~ 3/8"
    12mm ~ 15/32"
    13mm ~ 1/2"
    14mm ~ 9/16"
    17mm ~ 11/16"
    18mm ~ 23/32"
    19mm ~ 3/4"

    all things said
    i really like Honda. They limit the fasteners to mostly 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm, 19mm, and may be 32mm and everything is metric. For the most used sizes, the work space is usually tight so you want just the right sit:
    -For 10 and 12mm i make sure i have two or three backup sockets.
    -have different length sockets
    -have a few sets of wrenches

    i have some SAE tools but more metric because more things are metric since the late 1980's. All it takes is an email from marketing and the mechanical designers can set the autoCad preference to metric only design rules. Life in the great recession.




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    Dec 27, 2015 4:50 PM GMT
    ELNathB said

    Knowing the metric system myself, I can tell you that tolerances during manufacturing and assembly are much tighter. A much tighter tolerance translates into a higher quality manufactured product.


    Manufacturing tolerances are independent of the underlying measurement system.

    The US operates in the metric system when it matters.

    "Is global uniformity a good thing? Not when it comes to cultural issues, and customary measures are certainly a part of our national culture. But to have brains trained in the thirds, quarters, sixths, eighths, and twelfths of our inches and ounces, as well as the relentless decimals of the metric system can only be beneficial, in the same way that learning a second language is better than knowing only one. That ours is a dual-measurement country is part of our great diversity."- John Bemelmans Marciano, "Whatever Happened to the Metric System?"
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Dec 27, 2015 5:17 PM GMT
    AaronH20P saidCoincidence?

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    Countries that haven't done anything since:

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    Countries that just landed a probe on a comet last year:

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    Countries the US has relied on since 2011 to send astronauts into space:

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    Countries where the same right-wing nutjob citizens who constantly brag about having landed on the moon 46 years ago, don't want to believe those same space-program scientists on global warming:

    WKSqrZj.jpg

    Countries whose idiot right-wing nutjob citizens don't realize that their scientific community actually does use the metric system, and only uses the metric system:

    WKSqrZj.jpg

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    Dec 27, 2015 5:34 PM GMT
    I think it's also instructive to keep this metric thing in perspective. Not everything outside the US is metric. Crude oil in many countries is priced according to 42 or 55 US gallon drums, although the oil is typically transported in other much larger containers or via pipelines. And gold prices are still often given per ounce.

    On the other hand, when the new US currency was proposed over 230 years ago following the American Revolution, it was one of the few metric systems of money in the world at the time. It took the British until 1971 to convert their own pound, our former colonial currency, to a base-10 system of money like the dollar.

    So I wouldn't knock the US too much. And as I wrote earlier, much of our industry, especially products for the international market, and our sciences and laboratories, also medicine, are in fact metric. If you get an IV bag in the hospital it's a liter, not a quart, and your medicines are dispensed by the milligram (mg).

    What we see in our daily lives is mostly domestic, in our kitchens, our clothing, and our office workplaces. But the rest of the world usually doesn't see that, unless they come to visit us.
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    Dec 27, 2015 5:45 PM GMT
    Countries that have had robotic rovers operating on Mars, and still do:

    WKSqrZj.jpg

    Countries that have sent a craft to successfully photograph Pluto:

    WKSqrZj.jpg
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    Dec 27, 2015 6:09 PM GMT
    AaronH20P saidCoincidence?

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    Shouldn't that actually be labeled "Countries that have lost billion-dollar space probes due to metric conversion errors?"
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Dec 27, 2015 6:17 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidCountries that have had robotic rovers operating on Mars, and still do:

    WKSqrZj.jpg

    Countries that have sent a craft to successfully photograph Pluto:

    WKSqrZj.jpg


    Countries where people think they can trash the rest of the world, but get defensive when you dish it back to them:


    WKSqrZj.jpg

    Countries that think they're the only country in the world with scientific advancements, and they get defensive when you point out them that other countries have achieved things too:

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    Countries that need to take a fucking chill pill, and stop constantly masturbating to themselves:

    WKSqrZj.jpg

    Countries that have lost space probes and had two major space disasters:

    WKSqrZj.jpg
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    Dec 27, 2015 6:22 PM GMT
    mindgarden said
    Shouldn't that actually be labeled "Countries that have lost billion-dollar space probes due to metric conversion errors?"

    What space probe was that?
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Dec 27, 2015 6:22 PM GMT
    In The UK we have a mixed usage. We are taught metric in school but we still use the imperial system for distances, weight and height in informal settings. For anything technical metric is always used


    We use feet and inches (but also meters depending on what's being measured)
    Miles for distance but not really yards.
    Stones and pounds for weight for people but grams and kg for everything else
    Pints only pertain to beer. For everything else we use litres.



    We've only just been forced to use metric for selling goods due to EU regulations. Pricing by the pound makes goods seem cheaper than pricing by the kilo.

    The only metric we definitely use with no confusion is centigrade for temperature.


    One thing I don't see changing is using inches to refer to penis. When continental Europeans quote in cm I need to convert to inches. icon_lol.gif
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    Dec 27, 2015 6:26 PM GMT
    i was a dual science major in college. All my professors said the same thing. It doesnt matter what standard of measure you use. Even the metric system is flawed. They often said because even water atoms, can change size.


    http://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2012/03/metric%20system%20doesn't%20measure%20up.html
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Dec 27, 2015 6:31 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    mindgarden said
    Shouldn't that actually be labeled "Countries that have lost billion-dollar space probes due to metric conversion errors?"

    What space probe was that?


    The Mars Climate Orbiter.
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    Dec 27, 2015 6:35 PM GMT
    jjguy05 said... Countries where the same right-wing nutjob citizens who constantly brag about having landed on the moon 46 years ago...

    +1

    so true
    something that happened 2001 was a LONG time ago and certainty did not happen in recent memory. 1969 was a REALLY LONG time ago and this seems to get lost on with the conservative side.
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    Dec 27, 2015 6:53 PM GMT
    mindgarden said
    Shouldn't that actually be labeled "Countries that have lost billion-dollar space probes due to metric conversion errors?"


    Maybe, but that's because other countries don't even have that much money to lose in the first place. icon_cool.gif
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    Dec 27, 2015 7:21 PM GMT
    your point being...
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    Dec 27, 2015 7:21 PM GMT
    You see, adopting "Standards" becomes easily infested by politics icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 27, 2015 7:34 PM GMT
    Or maybe too busy drawing dicks on Mars to care.

    ioqgeXs.jpg

    You have my permission to obsess over the USA and debate whether that glorious dick should be measured in inches or some metric unit.