The risks are "high"

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 31, 2015 11:24 PM GMT
    Is air travel getting more risky?

    This is the second new article I have read that recently tells a similar story about bad weather causing big issues with the planes.

    Seems like it's getting a little more risky with our climate change???



    21 passengers sent to hospitals after Air Canada flight diverts to Calgary


    http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/todayinthesky/2015/12/31/air-canada-turbulence/78140262/
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 01, 2016 1:02 AM GMT
    2Bnaked saidIs air travel getting more risky?

    This is the second new article I have read that recently tells a similar story about bad weather causing big issues with the planes.

    Seems like it's getting a little more risky with our climate change???



    21 passengers sent to hospitals after Air Canada flight diverts to Calgary


    http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/todayinthesky/2015/12/31/air-canada-turbulence/78140262/


    Air travel is unlikely to become anywhere nearly as risky as driving, yet some people are more afraid of air travel; it's irrational.

    Often the degree of fear people experience bears no relationship to the actual risk. Likewise, the horror of deaths often bears no relationship to the number of people killed. People are horrified over the number of people killed in mass shootings but pay little attention the the far greater number of people killed in road accidents or by medical errors.

    An airliner accident that killed 200 people would make international headlines whereas 35K people killed in road accidents goes almost unnoticed.

    That said, of course we should strive to eliminate mass shootings, make road travel safer, and put in procedures to reduce the number of medical errors.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 01, 2016 1:10 AM GMT
    I am not sure it is more risky or we are prone to instant information about a news event, etc.

    In this case, passengers were foretold by the pilot that bad inclement weather was more than likely to occur within the flight and to fasten their seat belts at all times, some did not fasten their seat beltsicon_rolleyes.gif, and hence were ejected from their seats-so again it is the stupidity of some passengers not hiding the call to fasten your seat belt. I always not matter what fasten my seatbelt when flying and when I am sleep I ensure that the seat belt is seen by the flight attendants if they are doing the rounds at night to ensure you have your seatbelt on when I am asleep not to be disturbed.

    On my recent Lufthansa flight from Munich to San Francisco our pilot forewarned of bad inclement through Nova Scotia and Greenland and sure enough we encountered bad weather, but yet again all passengers that I recalled had their seat belts. Additionally, flight attendants were walking through the aisles ensuring everyone had their seatbelts on. So again it also depends on the crew and the airline.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 01, 2016 4:30 PM GMT
    Air accidents might kill less people, but it doesn't shock me if people are more afraid of them. I suppose people think of mid-air disasters, which most certainly result in violent deaths for all passengers, whereas they might feel more confident in their survival chances in a road accident, especially if they feel they're a good driver.

    Even though most air travel accidents statistically occur just before takeoff or right after landing.
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    Jan 01, 2016 5:45 PM GMT
    What kills people is not always the impact, but the smoke.

    The fuselage of a crashed jet can fill up with smoke in 20 seconds, and people die from the asphyxiation. So if God forbid you are in a crash, GET THE HELL OUT ASAP. Getting a seat close to a door has a major advantage.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 01, 2016 6:08 PM GMT
    2Bnaked saidIs air travel getting more risky?

    This is the second new article I have read that recently tells a similar story about bad weather causing big issues with the planes.

    Seems like it's getting a little more risky with our climate change???



    21 passengers sent to hospitals after Air Canada flight diverts to Calgary


    http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/todayinthesky/2015/12/31/air-canada-turbulence/78140262/

    If passengers got hurt walking around the plane after being advised of turbulence (or sitting in their seats with seat belts not buckled) it's their own damn fault. It is announced on all flights today, that passengers should keep their seatbelts buckled in case of unexpected air turbulence.
  • dumbbell

    Posts: 32

    Jan 02, 2016 3:10 AM GMT
    After nearly twenty years of flying professionally and a lifetime growing up in an aviation family, it still seems just as much as ever that everybody's an expert when it comes to the topics of aviation and airline safety.

    Injuries related to clear air turbulence have much to do with bad luck, because in the year 2016, CAT no more shows up on radar than it did in 1966. They also have something to do with not having your seatbelt fastened, and with the fact that sometimes you just have to or want to take the damn thing off.

    But one thing none of this has anything to do with is "climate change". There have been turbulence injuries and diversions since Adam was a cowboy. Nothing new here.

    And it doesn't matter what the facts are, most people will never be disabused of the misconception of airline emergencies, rare as they may be (and they are much rarer today with "climate change" than they were in 66 without "climate change") as invariably deadly -- except by some stroke of crazy-ass, death-defying luck.

    But most passengers survived whatever few emergencies did occur in 66 thanks not to luck but to the Stewardesses who did their jobs. Today there are even fewer airline incidents and emergencies requiring the application of those skills and training, but the Flight Attendants are just as highly trained.

    Flying on first-world airlines is as safe as it gets and there is no "climate change"-related safety risk.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 02, 2016 11:09 PM GMT
    On the very rare occasions plane crashes do occur, the survival rate is still 95.7 percent (according to NTSB stats), so rather than adopting a fatalistic attitude about crashes, it really does make sense to follow all the safety advice given.

    Contrary to the alarmist thread title, "the risks" of air travel are statistically very very low.
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    Jan 03, 2016 5:57 AM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidOn the very rare occasions plane crashes do occur, the survival rate is still 95.7 percent (according to NTSB stats), so rather than adopting a fatalistic attitude about crashes, it really does make sense to follow all the safety advice given.

    Contrary to the alarmist thread title, "the risks" of air travel are statistically very very low.


    You really didn't "GET IT" did you??