How do You Determine How Much CO2 is Produced When Methane is burned?

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    Jan 02, 2016 5:48 PM GMT
    Considering the effects of climate change, I was wondering just how much CO2 is generated by burning methane. It has been a few years since I took chemistry in high school, and my memories are really vague.. I know that complete combustion of 1 molecule of methane -CH4 - takes 2 molecules of O2, resulting in 1 molecule of CO2 and 2 molecules of water - H2O. I have forgotten how to do the computations to turn that into weight of methane burned and weight of CO2 produced. Anyone know the simple answer to this (e.g., burning 1 kilo of methane produces x kilos of CO2)?
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    Jan 02, 2016 8:03 PM GMT
    Are you farting while holding a match to your butt?
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    Jan 02, 2016 9:42 PM GMT
    www.wolframalpha.com

    One way:

    "1kg ch4 to moles" yields an answer of 62.3346

    "62.3346 mol of CO2 to kg" (since you already know the ratio is 1:1; if you don't, search for "combustion of ch4" and do some basic arithmetic to balance the reaction) yields an answer of 2.74331kg.

    For some reason "CO2" is required for the second query, and "co2" doesn't work (even though "ch4" works in lower case for the first). Alpha is weird this way, and requires a lot of experimentation sometimes, but when you have the right answer you'll usually know.

    At any rate, the mass ratio should therefore be 1 : 2.73221

    Enjoy!
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    Jan 03, 2016 5:34 PM GMT
    HikerSkier saidConsidering the effects of climate change, I was wondering just how much CO2 is generated by burning methane. It has been a few years since I took chemistry in high school, and my memories are really vague.. I know that complete combustion of 1 molecule of methane -CH4 - takes 2 molecules of O2, resulting in 1 molecule of CO2 and 2 molecules of water - H2O. I have forgotten how to do the computations to turn that into weight of methane burned and weight of CO2 produced. Anyone know the simple answer to this (e.g., burning 1 kilo of methane produces x kilos of CO2)?


    Don't light your farts... In any event the world won't melt.

    We find that climate science scepticism is not limited to the scientifically illiterate (per Hoffman, 2011a), but well ensconced within this group of professional experts with scientific training – who work as leaders or advisors to management in governmental, non-governmental, and corporate organizations.

    http://oss.sagepub.com/content/33/11/1477.full

  • FRE0

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    Jan 04, 2016 2:06 AM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    HikerSkier saidConsidering the effects of climate change, I was wondering just how much CO2 is generated by burning methane. It has been a few years since I took chemistry in high school, and my memories are really vague.. I know that complete combustion of 1 molecule of methane -CH4 - takes 2 molecules of O2, resulting in 1 molecule of CO2 and 2 molecules of water - H2O. I have forgotten how to do the computations to turn that into weight of methane burned and weight of CO2 produced. Anyone know the simple answer to this (e.g., burning 1 kilo of methane produces x kilos of CO2)?


    Don't light your farts... In any event the world won't melt.

    We find that climate science scepticism is not limited to the scientifically illiterate (per Hoffman, 2011a), but well ensconced within this group of professional experts with scientific training – who work as leaders or advisors to management in governmental, non-governmental, and corporate organizations.

    http://oss.sagepub.com/content/33/11/1477.full



    Quite true, just as many doctors disagreed with the assertion that smoking tobacco was hazardous.
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    Jan 04, 2016 4:18 AM GMT
    These meters don't really work in an outdoor setting. They can measure CO2 in a closed or sealed room. There is extreme caution when dealing with carbon dioxide in a closed room. I suppose for your question with methane gas, you could experiment with a sealed room full of cows, feed them so they would eventually pass gas, in masse, take before and after meter measurements. The cows could die before your experiment ends. I am sure this maybe why most barns, on farms with cows, are open and not sealed spaces. Interesting question though icon_neutral.gif

    I have worked with liquid carbon dioxide in a closed room and have heard stories of people passing out and or dying due to the carbon dioxide levels in the room overtaking the amount of oxygen required to sustain human life. When you are working around CO2 and that meter alarm goes off, you want to immediately leave the room or risk death by suffocation. Not stuff to mess around with.

    This is just as bad as carbon monoxide poisoning, just as deadly


    Deaths & Injury Incidents on the Rise at Restaurants Using Liquid CO2
    http://ehssafetynewsamerica.com/2012/07/05/deaths-injury-incidents-on-the-rise-at-restaurants-using-liquid-co2/

    Aktivia-CO2-meters_18795_image.jpg
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    Jan 04, 2016 4:56 AM GMT
    This is when the CO2 gets real


    IMG_4150.jpg
    CO2tank.jpg


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    Jan 04, 2016 4:58 AM GMT
    Good grief. It's not that hard. You don't need search engines or calculators.

    CH4 = 12 +(4x1) = 16
    CO2 = 12 +(2x16)= 44

    44/16 = 2.75.

    You could massage a few decimal points for isotope ratios, but it's not going to make any difference to whatever back-of-the-envelope calculation that you had in mind.

    Or just ask a skool kid.
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    Jan 04, 2016 5:29 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidGood grief. It's not that hard. You don't need search engines or calculators.

    CH4 = 12 +(4x1) = 16
    CO2 = 12 +(2x16)= 44

    44/16 = 2.75.

    You could massage a few decimal points for isotope ratios, but it's not going to make any difference to whatever back-of-the-envelope calculation that you had in mind.

    Or just ask a skool kid.




    "I was wondering just how much CO2 is generated by burning methane"


    You just cant 'burn methane' anywhere? How do your figures establish a baseline measurement? Don't you have to establish both a normal rate of CO2 and a normal rate of burned methane first, before you throw out a number? Indoor confined spaces or outdoor? Temp controlled? What are all your variables that went into this? Standard formula for both?

    Working with temp controlled room, indoor CO2, I do know the standard meter safety threshold is 21%, at this level, the person would start to feel dizzy only. At least this is what my last employer set there CO2 meter to per the MSDS. I would assume for outdoor spaces and climate change experts, the CO2 human safety percent would be much lower

    Here is a really good article

    Exclusive: Elevated CO2 Levels Directly Affect Human Cognition, New Harvard Study Shows
    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/10/26/3714853/carbon-dioxide-impair-brain/
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    Jan 04, 2016 5:32 AM GMT
    Dude, you are babbling nonsense. Move immediately to a source of fresh air. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Re, the linked article... Or rather the actual paper referred to in it...
    Many moons ago, my group moved in to a brand new laboratory building with state-of-the-art computer controlled ventilation systems. All of the safety and exhaust systems conformed to the latest EPA and OSHA requirements.

    Everyone ignored us ungrateful students when we told them that made it impossible to work. E.g., I would weigh out 10 mg of 14C-laced chemical, in the specified radiation-safety cabinet, and the exhaust system would instantly suck it up and blow it out the roof-top stack icon_eek.gif

    Nothing was done, until the first night that the temperatures went down to around zero. Phones started ringing and deans got rousted in the middle of the night. It seems that our building was automatically heating all the required fresh air for all that ventilation, and blowing it up the stacks... And consuming the entire towns supply of natural gas! (And thereby, incidentally, burning methane...)
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    Jan 04, 2016 5:58 AM GMT
    HikerSkier saidConsidering the effects of climate change, I was wondering just how much CO2 is generated by burning methane. It has been a few years since I took chemistry in high school, and my memories are really vague.. I know that complete combustion of 1 molecule of methane -CH4 - takes 2 molecules of O2, resulting in 1 molecule of CO2 and 2 molecules of water - H2O. I have forgotten how to do the computations to turn that into weight of methane burned and weight of CO2 produced. Anyone know the simple answer to this (e.g., burning 1 kilo of methane produces x kilos of CO2)?




    VOC's are now a bigger raging issue, apparently. Private industry is so behind government. Look, tape has VOC ratings! Industry is changing if we are now measuring outgassing of tape! "That New Car Smell" will be next. Sometimes its overkill icon_rolleyes.gif
    Low VOC Polyethylene cloth adhesive tape
    https://www.teraokatape.co.jp/english/products/use/use005/list002/data_000749.html




    Volatile organic compound
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volatile_organic_compound

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are organic chemicals that have a high vapor pressure at ordinary room temperature. Their high vapor pressure results from a low boiling point, which causes large numbers of molecules to evaporate or sublimate from the liquid or solid form of the compound and enter the surrounding air. For example, formaldehyde, which evaporates from paint, has a boiling point of only –19 °C (–2 °F).

    VOCs are numerous, varied, and ubiquitous. They include both human-made and naturally occurring chemical compounds. Most scents or odors are of VOCs. VOCs play an important role in communication between plants,[1] and messages from plants to animals. Some VOCs are dangerous to human health or cause harm to the environment. Anthropogenic VOCs are regulated by law, especially indoors, where concentrations are the highest. Harmful VOCs typically are not acutely toxic, but have compounding long-term health effects. Because the concentrations are usually low and the symptoms slow to develop, research into VOCs and their effects is difficult

    US[edit]

    VOCs (or specific subsets of the VOCs) are legally defined in the various laws and codes under which they are regulated. Other definitions may be found from government agencies investigating or advising about VOCs.[6] The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates VOCs in the air, water, and land. The Safe Drinking Water Act implementation includes a list labeled "VOCs in connection with contaminants that are organic and volatile."[7] The EPA also publishes testing methods for chemical compounds, some of which refer to VOCs.[8]

    In addition to drinking water, VOCs are regulated in discharges to waters (sewage treatment and stormwater disposal), as hazardous waste,[9] but not in non industrial indoor air.[10] The United States Department of Labor and its Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulate VOC exposure in the workplace. Volatile organic compounds that are hazardous material would be regulated by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration while being transported.

    Biologically generated VOCs[edit]

    Not counting methane, biological sources emit an estimated 1150 teragrams of carbon per year in the form of VOCs.[11] The majority of VOCs are produced by plants, the main compound being isoprene. The remainder are produced by animals, microbes, and fungi, such as molds.

    The strong odor emitted by many plants consists of green leaf volatiles, a subset of VOCs. Emissions are affected by a variety of factors, such as temperature, which determines rates of volatilization and growth, and sunlight, which determines rates of biosynthesis. Emission occurs almost exclusively from the leaves, the stomata in particular. A major class of VOCs is terpenes, such as myrcene.[12] Providing a sense of scale, a forest 62,000 km2 in area (the U.S. state of Pennsylvania) is estimated to emit 3,400,000 kilograms of terpenes on a typical August day during the growing season.[13] VOCs should be a factor in choosing which trees to plant in urban areas.[14] Induction of genes producing volatile organic compounds, and subsequent increase in volatile terpenes has been achieved in maize using (Z)-3-Hexen-1-ol and other plant hormones.[15]
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    Jan 04, 2016 10:15 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidDude, you are babbling nonsense. Move immediately to a source of fresh air. icon_rolleyes.gif

    He might be too busy and distracted from maneuvering the match into the right place.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 04, 2016 10:27 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidGood grief. It's not that hard. You don't need search engines or calculators.

    CH4 = 12 +(4x1) = 16
    CO2 = 12 +(2x16)= 44

    44/16 = 2.75.

    You could massage a few decimal points for isotope ratios, but it's not going to make any difference to whatever back-of-the-envelope calculation that you had in mind.

    Or just ask a skool kid.

    Thanks to you and anotherphil. I could have computed this easily in high school - it's just been a long time.
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    Jan 04, 2016 11:40 PM GMT
    Cool, I finally learned something useful on RJ! icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 04, 2016 11:51 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidCool, I finally learned something useful on RJ! icon_lol.gif

    You didn't know that farts ignited?   icon_eek.gif
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    Jan 05, 2016 3:53 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    paulflexes saidCool, I finally learned something useful on RJ! icon_lol.gif

    You didn't know that farts ignited?   icon_eek.gif
    Nope, I had no idea. And I still don't believe it. Maybe I should run my own scientific experiment to see if that's true. Does anyone volunteer to hold the lighter?
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3521

    Jan 21, 2016 5:04 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    paulflexes saidCool, I finally learned something useful on RJ! icon_lol.gif

    You didn't know that farts ignited?   icon_eek.gif
    Nope, I had no idea. And I still don't believe it. Maybe I should run my own scientific experiment to see if that's true. Does anyone volunteer to hold the lighter?


    why, when we have a whole internet full of frat boy idiots...

    https://youtu.be/4bAUce5JHs8