Opinion on this career choice- Horses

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 02, 2016 7:27 PM GMT
    Who else has experience with horses?


    After watching the new year Rose Parade, Equestrian has always interested me but usually for fun. I am not sure my, now older body, could handle the physical demands of horses and their care. I love this animal, they are so majestic, I am also a Sagittarius astrological fire sign, so I understand their roam 'freedom', open space, fiery temperament.

    I can ride and control a horse, full gallop. Not just trail riding with a guide. This 'famous' equine program, at Pierce College (advertised the day of the rose parade by announcers) looks pretty intense and physical at times

    The full course includes saddling and hoofing your own horse. This would be the only concern I would have due to my lower back sciatica. Unfortunately, my physical limitations would probably prevent me from starting this late life career. In the pictures, I only see very young people as students

    I don't know of any other Equestrian type learning programs like this except in other states that are rural in nature such as Wyoming and The Dakotas. I think I would do very well in this program if I was a we bit younger, Gay Rodeo is popular but again, too physical demanding. I would love though to ride a horse in a parade such as the Rose.


    http://www.piercecollege.edu/departments/agriculture/equine.asp


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    Beautiful Palominos (the color)

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    Jan 02, 2016 7:44 PM GMT


    icon_cool.gif


    Carson Kressley Prepares to Ride American Saddlebred Horses for 2nd Year in a Row at The Rose Parade
    http://ktla.com/2015/12/31/carson-kressley-prepares-to-ride-american-saddlebred-horses-for-2nd-year-in-a-row-at-the-rose-parade/



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    Jan 02, 2016 8:01 PM GMT
    Johnny West, Thunderbolt and Thundercolt, had them all icon_redface.gificon_razz.gif



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    I did not have the red one icon_sad.gif


    MARX_BEST_OF_THE_WEST_HORSE_LOT_THUNDERB
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    Jan 02, 2016 8:18 PM GMT


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    Jan 02, 2016 8:23 PM GMT
    Most of the people I know who work with horses have done so their entire lives, especially before they have reached 20, so you would have a lot of catching up to do.

    I tend to take the brute force view when studying hypothetical careers, and search for a generic keyword on monster.com, dice.com, etc., not to look for specific openings but to see what sort of job titles come up.

    Ranching and sport riding are probably out of the question for now for you unless you have a lot more experience than you've described here. There appear to be a lot of veterinary assistant/technician positions floating around, but they would take some intense formal education (at least the tech side).

    What I do see for entry level is handling:

    http://www.theequinest.com/horse-jobs-handler/

    There are some others here:

    http://www.theequinest.com/horse-jobs-and-careers/

    "Stall cleaner" might be a worst-case foot in the door. ;)

    Looks like grooming, riding, and other basic work are part of handling, and I'm sure that would be a great way to get some general exposure to the community. In the mean time, these sorts of jobs would benefit both from the general competency courses you've mentioned and from light reading about basics like diet and nutrition, handling, first aid, etc.

    Good luck; whether or not you end up applying for jobs in this field it definitely sounds at the very least like an exciting experimental hobby for you!

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    Jan 02, 2016 9:09 PM GMT
    anotherphil saidMost of the people I know who work with horses have done so their entire lives, especially before they have reached 20, so you would have a lot of catching up to do.

    I tend to take the brute force view when studying hypothetical careers, and search for a generic keyword on monster.com, dice.com, etc., not to look for specific openings but to see what sort of job titles come up.

    Ranching and sport riding are probably out of the question for now for you unless you have a lot more experience than you've described here. There appear to be a lot of veterinary assistant/technician positions floating around, but they would take some intense formal education (at least the tech side).

    What I do see for entry level is handling:

    http://www.theequinest.com/horse-jobs-handler/

    There are some others here:

    http://www.theequinest.com/horse-jobs-and-careers/

    "Stall cleaner" might be a worst-case foot in the door. ;)

    Looks like grooming, riding, and other basic work are part of handling, and I'm sure that would be a great way to get some general exposure to the community. In the mean time, these sorts of jobs would benefit both from the general competency courses you've mentioned and from light reading about basics like diet and nutrition, handling, first aid, etc.

    Good luck; whether or not you end up applying for jobs in this field it definitely sounds at the very least like an exciting experimental hobby for you!







    I wont say how or why I was here, but this place, Eagle Ridge Lodge, ND, used to give horseback riding a new name, 300k acres to roam freely, and not on any trail. Yes I had one guide, the owner of this place. I was fortunate enough to find this place when I did (newly opened 2001), the best 3 hours (and $60) I ever spent on a horse ride, honing my riding skill, through the 'badlands' of North Dakota, simply amazing and inspirational.

    Most stables today, around the country, are now trail ride only. According to stable owners, the insurance/liability has all but shut down free range riding even if the rider still signs a liability waiver. This is what happened to Eagle Ridge. In fact, they stopped all horseback riding tours and trails, completely. That is too bad because the scenery, especially in the summer when I was there, is just spectacular, one of those hidden gems most people will never experience. At the time, I literally had to search for this place even before I left for this trip just to make sure I could find it on the map.

    Because of the insurance issue, I may never 'ride a horse' again being forced on touristy, boring trail rides. The Peirce College equestrian program would at least get me back into the riding saddle. Unless I suddenly win the lottery, buy my own ranch and own my own horses, you are probably right, this is my exciting hobby, and that it will, unfortunately, stay. icon_sad.gif

    BTW, I was invited back to the lodge icon_cool.gif

    http://eagleridgelodge.com/index.htm
    http://www.medorand.com/

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    Jan 02, 2016 9:30 PM GMT
    You may just be best off marrying a rancher (would that make you a saddledigger?) if that's what you want.

    More seriously, the ranchers I've known are pretty sociable people; it's not uncommon to let someone less experienced ride along for light work as long as they conduct themselves professionally. It's a real stretch if you don't already know someone, but that's where entry-level stable work could come in if you're not looking for something highly lucrative (e.g., if you're treating this as early retirement planning instead of a full-blown career).

    The biggest reason why I discounted ranching out of hand is that you'd have to know a *lot* about cattle and have a lot of serious experience with them (on top of knowing a lot about horses) to have a paid position on a ranch. Riding along with new friends is a much lower barrier to entry (and would be a great learning/broadening experience as well).

    *That* said, the ranching community can (at least where I'm from) still be kind of homophobic. I wouldn't expect outright discrimination or hostility, but a little extra patience might be called for.
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    Jan 02, 2016 9:40 PM GMT
    anotherphil saidYou may just be best off marrying a rancher (would that make you a saddledigger?) if that's what you want.

    More seriously, the ranchers I've known are pretty sociable people; it's not uncommon to let someone less experienced ride along for light work as long as they conduct themselves professionally. It's a real stretch if you don't already know someone, but that's where entry-level stable work could come in if you're not looking for something highly lucrative (e.g., if you're treating this as early retirement planning instead of a full-blown career).

    The biggest reason why I discounted ranching out of hand is that you'd have to know a *lot* about cattle and have a lot of serious experience with them (on top of knowing a lot about horses) to have a paid position on a ranch. Riding along with new friends is a much lower barrier to entry (and would be a great learning/broadening experience as well).

    *That* said, the ranching community can (at least where I'm from) still be kind of homophobic. I wouldn't expect outright discrimination or hostility, but a little extra patience might be called for.







    It cant be anymore homophobic than I already experience in the science and engineering field, plus the men who ranch are way hotter than any science geek icon_razz.gif


    Saddledigger?, Only if my master handler looks like this icon_razz.gif


    shirtless-cowboy-enjoying-time-alone-wit

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    Jan 02, 2016 9:48 PM GMT
    ELNathB said
    anotherphil said...

    *That* said, the ranching community can (at least where I'm from) still be kind of homophobic. I wouldn't expect outright discrimination or hostility, but a little extra patience might be called for.







    It cant be anymore homophobic than I already experience in the science and engineering field, plus the men who ranch are way hotter than any science geek icon_razz.gif


    I'd say slightly more, but not much more. More politically outspoken about the subject, but less persistently discriminatory and assholish about it.

    ELNathB said
    Saddledigger?, Only if my master handler looks like this icon_razz.gif


    shirtless-cowboy-enjoying-time-alone-wit



    Looks like a good plan to me. icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 02, 2016 10:00 PM GMT


    Now this is what I am talking about, ride it like you stole it!

    I have to go to Hawaii? icon_confused.gif




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    Jan 03, 2016 1:32 AM GMT
    The kindergarten that I attended actually taught horsemanship. There are all kinds of "riding academies" around that give lessons. Beyond that, it's "animal husbandry" at the community college level.

    A few years ago, I bought a couple of truckloads of orchard equipment from an orange farm near Ojai. They were ripping out a lot of the oranges, and putting in stables and corrals, and riding paths. They had been boarding a few horses for rich girls from LA, and realized that it was making a lot more money per acre than growing food.

    You should have seen the change in the faces of the young guys who were helping me load dirty equipment, when some cute girls drove in, and they "had to" leave me to grab a quick shower and go help the girls with their horses. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jan 03, 2016 1:38 AM GMT
    Oh, there are also plenty of horse-packers around who take city people on rides into the wilderness areas. Because, you know they're too good to walk on their own feet, and they have a lot of money. It makes actually hiking on the main trails pretty miserable. And all the horse shit around the camp sites draws in flies like one of the circles of hell.

    A few of the guys I went to high school with are real-life Cowboys. I let one of them "rest" some of his horses in my pasture sometimes, while he "works" two others. Those guys all look like they're about 90, and have since they were 30. They live in single-wide trailers amid heaps of trash, and have no teeth left.
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    Jan 03, 2016 2:32 AM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    Never heard of hoofing a horse. I suppose you mean shoeing one, which is what a farrier does.

    I've been around them much of life. Leaned to ride western and English from when I was a little kid. Never had my own but we spent a lot of vacations on working ranches where even when I was very young I'd be up before everyone, saddling up my horse and out for a ride.

    I've been chased down by a stallion (fucker bit me) and had to escape through an electric fence. I don't even remember how I got to the other side of the fence. I've been kicked and I've been thrown twice. Love horses. I was thrown as a little kid when a rattler spooked my horse and I was thrown again--as hairy as a fucking ride gets--in my late 20s or early 30s, out with my partner. That was crazy. The horse was nuts. I wound up under that thing still in the saddle with the those hooves stomping alongside my head. I managed to get out of the stirrups and threw myself while upside down off to the side as the horse was in full run. Damn it though, that was before youtube. Would have gone viral for sure.

    My partner ran ahead, caught the horse and I climbed back on. I tightened that saddle first, though.

    I don't ride anymore but only because of a nasty construction accident. Still love them. Love being around them. I have ridden my niece's jumper but only after she's tired her out. And then just to walk her after a practice. For your back you might want to try a Tennessee walker which would have a more gentle gait for you.

    Otherwise, age shouldn't be an issue, not now anyway. My brother's in his 60s and he cares for I think there's three now at the ranch, not far from the house. Though my niece moved in so she's doing most of the work now. My brother did a lot for a long time. And they were renting stalls back then so there were more animals and more work. A horse is a lot of work.

    I also have spent some time at a track because a friend in high school had his own trotter, gift (tax write-off) from his dad. Love the trotters, all that power but restrained. Beautiful to watch. So I've seen a lot of the work involved on dude ranch, on a private ranch and a track. As mindgarden notes, many of those jobs don't pay much.

    I don't know about uniformed work with horses (cop, parade, whatever) but I'd imagine that's a tough job to luck into. Your age problem with that might be a matter of seniority. I'd imagine that's considered a privileged position.

    But you could try something like a big animal vet assistant or train as a farrier if you are in a rural area and sub yourself out, though I've no idea the market for that. I know my brother uses a local farrier instead of doing that work himself.

    You could also train as a groom and maybe hook into a private owner looking for someone to manage the ranch. Be aware that horse people tend to be a bit quirky and I'm being kind about that.

    There are numerous equestrian communities of some big money with acre-plus houses. Some people might have a horse or two so they do most of their own work. But some of these houses have very substantial land with stables. And some of those stables are fancier than most people's houses. I've not personally seen the groom's quarters in any but I'd bet that's real good living and a very fun job.

    Martha's stables. Love the mini's. There was a minihorse at my brother's for a while--I used to feed him his special diet--very fun. And look, she even has a mini donkey. Oh how cute. I must hug him.
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    Oh shit, how fucking cute is this
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    okay, now I have to plan a visit to family to get some horse time in.

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    Jan 03, 2016 2:22 PM GMT
    I agree with you, horses are majestic creatures. For your interest in working with horses, it really depends what you like to do. Become a owner, be a trainer, breeder, or in general would like to learn good horsemanship ? I am sure there are areas you can be involved working with horses without allot of physical demands.

    There are several riding academies through out the states who can teach you basic riding skills and proper handling when working with horses.

    Good luck on your search.
  • camfer

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    Jan 03, 2016 4:30 PM GMT
    Paso Fino is another good choice for older riders with issues like back pain or sciatica.

    Sold all the horses because they are a lot of work and a lot of money. Hay has doubled in price here, and it wasn't cheap before. It was nice not having all the flies around for a few years. Now my neighbor's got horses again, and the flies are back.

    Another place you might be able to do real tourist riding is on Indian land. As sovereign nations, they don't have US liability laws.

    It seems like a bit of a pipe dream to start an equine career with little experience, physical limitations, and later in life. Maybe you could find an equine therapy program that takes on volunteers? But you'll probably end up with a bunch of old ladies talking baby talk to the horses while grooming them for hours on end.
  • equus77

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    Jan 03, 2016 5:23 PM GMT
    I trained Saddlebreds for 10 years. I didn't have my first riding lesson until after I graduated from college. So, it is possible to start later in life.

    Sadly, I'm no longer involved with horses. I miss it every day. I had hoped to have my own training barn but guess it wasn't meant to be. I hope to be involved again someday sooner rather than later.

    Good luck to you!
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    Jan 04, 2016 9:40 PM GMT
    camfer saidPaso Fino is another good choice for older riders with issues like back pain or sciatica.

    Sold all the horses because they are a lot of work and a lot of money. Hay has doubled in price here, and it wasn't cheap before. It was nice not having all the flies around for a few years. Now my neighbor's got horses again, and the flies are back.

    Another place you might be able to do real tourist riding is on Indian land. As sovereign nations, they don't have US liability laws.

    It seems like a bit of a pipe dream to start an equine career with little experience, physical limitations, and later in life. Maybe you could find an equine therapy program that takes on volunteers? But you'll probably end up with a bunch of old ladies talking baby talk to the horses while grooming them for hours on end.


    Good post on a horse of no posting. I've never ridden one but they sure do look fun.



    The volunteer idea could lead to a full time position, certainly making contacts in the horsey community. I've an old school friend out west now who was an abused kid, always running away from home, often living with a bunch of our other friends, one in particular, one of my favorite people. I don't recall him staying with me though my house did harbor others at necessary times. So anyway, he wound up with his own biz and got himself a ranch and he runs now a volunteer therapy horse riding facility for abused kids and kids with learning disabilities.

    I last saw him just a few years ago. One of these guys who I don't see often but whenever he shows up to one of our gatherings I'm real happy to see him. A real good guy.

    Horses can be amazing with kids. My niece on hers was so funny especially when she was younger because she's tiny and her horse is huge. She could walk under that thing practically without ducking. But she has excellent control over it and the horse could not be friendlier. Comes right over to me every time I'm there even if I haven't been back in a while. My niece taught her how to say please and thank you for a snack. It's just an odd nodding of the head but it still counts.