LA gays expanding- DTLA

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    Jan 03, 2016 2:08 AM GMT
    There appears to be a shift in state of CA gay logistics. Its interesting with the closing of several, traditional, Los Angeles area gay venues or establishments and the huge heterosexual gentrification of the current gayborhood known as WeHo, that downtown LA, (a much needed facelift) may becoming the new 'gayborhood'.

    But don't tell anyone because as we know, where the gays go, liberal straights will eventually follow. All kidding aside, there has always been this "west side, east side" gay thing going on within the LA gay community.

    The city of Silverlake was the original home to the gay community until the incorporation of West Hollywood in 1984. There seems to be a 'secret' undertaking, while LA try's to deal with its homeless population in downtown.

    That is, move the gays in, and spruce up the place! Don't we always icon_razz.gif

    This weekend I found out, 6, that is 6 new gay bars in downtown LA! These are not included in the traditional gay publications either, I am finding out about these through word of mouth! Of course WeHo doesn't want to lose its status as gay mecca, but those who live in the area, 'see the writing on the wall' for the city of the gays. I mean straight people have practically taken over the Abbey off of Santa Monica and the gays are now venturing over to the straight establishment 1OAK on Sunset. House of Blues, a Sunset staple for 30 years, is now moving.

    Most large gay parties are now taking place downtown LA at mix use venues where straight and gay party promoters book certain events. I just have a feeling, there is a seismic shift going on that many LA gays might not know about.

    When you combine the bars still in the Silverlake area, Hollywood and now the DTLA bars (serving the financial district which is basically all in the same region now), add the Metro line DTLA main station, we now have a growing, 'new gay center'. What is happening in San Francisco, the living expense driving out our own gay community maybe forcing the shift into DTLA since WeHo is already under a shift itself

    Here are the gay establishments when you Google search, DTLA, they might not be listed in any WeHo publication

    Precinct - Rock And Roll Gay Bar
    Redline - Gay Bar and Lounge
    740
    The New Jalisco Bar
    La Cita Bar - Latin dance club
    Golden Gopher



    This Logo series, DTLA, was brief but was very good and I wish it continued with more seasons, just as you got to know the characters, much like Queer As Folk long history, DTLA got cut short

    I may think about moving downtown LA before its gets too expensive, like everything else the gays touch icon_rolleyes.gif



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    Jan 03, 2016 2:20 AM GMT
    The old "gay triangle" in Portland is now completely obliterated, replaced by high-rise condos and trendy, expensive shops and boutique hotels.

    Last week, I read with a shudder, in the "Business" section of the paper, several real estate tycoons identifying Chinatown/Old Town as the next hot market neighborhood... Exactly where the remaining gay bars have moved to. (The Chinese restaurants have already started moving out to the East Side). I can just imagine the bartenders pulling on their shirts, with a sigh, and starting to box up the bottles. Again. And the GoGo boys packing their belongings into their sad little roll-on bags. Again. And the DJ packing up the sound system. Again.

    Time to move on... Again. icon_cry.gif
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    Jan 03, 2016 2:22 AM GMT
    ELNathB said

    There appears to be a shift in gay logistics. Its interesting with the closing of several, traditional, Los Angeles area gay venues or establishments and the huge heterosexual gentrification of the current gayborhood known as WeHo, that downtown LA, (a much needed facelift) may becoming the new 'gayborhood'.

    The same in San Francisco - Gentrification by all the straight silicon valley 20 somethings making $150k+ has pretty much eliminated most of the traditional "South of Market" bars in the city (as well as caused city rents to double and triple). The Castro is still mostly gay bars (but young gay men can't afford to live there anymore.)

    It is far worse in a way than in LA, because SF is such a tiny city (7 miles square, with 1/4 being park)- there is no room to grow, and little undeveloped or industrial areas where bars and restaurants might move to.

    There is just no place for a new gayborhood to develop in SF.
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    Jan 03, 2016 2:31 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidThe old "gay triangle" in Portland is now completely obliterated, replaced by high-rise condos and trendy, expensive shops and boutique hotels.

    Last week, I read with a shudder, in the "Business" section of the paper, several real estate tycoons identifying Chinatown/Old Town as the next hot market neighborhood... Exactly where the remaining gay bars have moved to. (The Chinese restaurants have already started moving out to the East Side). I can just imagine the bartenders pulling on their shirts, with a sigh, and starting to box up the bottles. Again. And the GoGo boys packing their belongings into their sad little roll-on bags. Again. And the DJ packing up the sound system. Again.

    Time to move on... Again. icon_cry.gif


    That triangle was a thing back in the day, but now almost all of Portland is super gay friendly.
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    Jan 03, 2016 2:36 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidThe old "gay triangle" in Portland is now completely obliterated, replaced by high-rise condos and trendy, expensive shops and boutique hotels.

    Last week, I read with a shudder, in the "Business" section of the paper, several real estate tycoons identifying Chinatown/Old Town as the next hot market neighborhood... Exactly where the remaining gay bars have moved to. (The Chinese restaurants have already started moving out to the East Side). I can just imagine the bartenders pulling on their shirts, with a sigh, and starting to box up the bottles. Again. And the GoGo boys packing their belongings into their sad little roll-on bags. Again. And the DJ packing up the sound system. Again.

    Time to move on... Again. icon_cry.gif




    This is what happened to the Circus Disco-Arena Nightclub here which just closed its doors for good Jan 1st 2016. It appears they had one last dance party, an afterhours New Years at Arena. I drove past there last night and the whole property is completely dark and the usual open parking lots the gates are closed and chained.

    I assume, clear out of all equipment, supplies and demolition of the buildings will start shortly. They are putting up housing units in this space.

    Remember, San Francisco and Los Angeles are in the same state, so its possible as the people are forced out of SF due to unaffordability, the state coffers are preparing for a influx of old SF, gay residents into Los Angeles neighborhoods, namely what looks to be, DTLA since WeHo is already overcrowded, overpriced and suffering from the same gentrification.
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    Jan 03, 2016 2:40 AM GMT
    How's the Redline? I like lounges for their laid-back atmosphere, I'm a bit too old to enjoy the *thump*thump*thump* of the clubs. There are few gay places in OC and I think nothing in Irvine, where my bf lives. I recently learned that it's mostly conservative Christian. I'm moving down there later this month to be closer to school and will definitely miss the valley.
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    Jan 03, 2016 2:43 AM GMT
    HikerSkier said
    ELNathB said

    There appears to be a shift in gay logistics. Its interesting with the closing of several, traditional, Los Angeles area gay venues or establishments and the huge heterosexual gentrification of the current gayborhood known as WeHo, that downtown LA, (a much needed facelift) may becoming the new 'gayborhood'.

    The same in San Francisco - Gentrification by all the straight silicon valley 20 somethings making $150k+ has pretty much eliminated most of the traditional "South of Market" bars in the city (as well as caused city rents to double and triple). The Castro is still mostly gay bars (but young gay men can't afford to live there anymore.)

    It is far worse in a way than in LA, because SF is such a tiny city (7 miles square, with 1/4 being park)- there is no room to grow, and little undeveloped or industrial areas where bars and restaurants might move to.

    There is just no place for a new gayborhood to develop in SF.




    This is why I seriously think downtown LA has become the San Francisco 'annex', for those gays forced out. Those gay DTLA establishments are quite new and many people don't know about them because the focus has always been on WeHo. Those in the state power vacuum and structure, might not want everyone to know, 'the plan' yet, but I definitely see it coming icon_idea.gif


    Its possible Sacramento state capitol is assisting people with housing needs out of SF and into LA



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    Jan 03, 2016 2:48 AM GMT
    runner1701 saidHow's the Redline? I like lounges for their laid-back atmosphere, I'm a bit too old to enjoy the *thump*thump*thump* of the clubs. There are few gay places in OC and I think nothing in Irvine, where my bf lives. I recently learned that it's mostly conservative Christian. I'm moving down there later this month to be closer to school and will definitely miss the valley.




    I haven't been yet, I just learned of all these places this weekend

  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14345

    Jan 03, 2016 2:08 PM GMT
    The gay and lesbian community is much more assimilated now so the need for traditional gay neighborhoods, bars, etc. is steadily diminishing as a result. The same processes are at work here in Buffalo as out west in Portland, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Traditional gay streets and neighborhoods are being gentrified by a predominately heterosexual influx of new prosperous residents. Rents have skyrocketed in Buffalo's Allentown neighborhood long the hub of the GLB community and many gays have moved out of Allentown to other areas of the city itself and into the suburbs. Almost all of the gay clubs are still in the city's Allentown neighborhood along with the art galleries and antique shops. But how long they remain in this neighborhood remains to be seen. I would love to see downtown Buffalo experience the same investment and building boom that downtown Los Angeles is experiencing but that all depends on our areas economy and real estate market continuing their steady revitalization.
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    Jan 03, 2016 5:33 PM GMT
    ELNathB said
    runner1701 saidHow's the Redline? I like lounges for their laid-back atmosphere, I'm a bit too old to enjoy the *thump*thump*thump* of the clubs. There are few gay places in OC and I think nothing in Irvine, where my bf lives. I recently learned that it's mostly conservative Christian. I'm moving down there later this month to be closer to school and will definitely miss the valley.




    I haven't been yet, I just learned of all these places this weekend



    I think I remember hearing about 740 from before I left LA, but yeah, all the others are new to me.

    And sad to see it actually happen with Arena / Circus as it's been close to ten years since I first talked to Gene about doing something with the site.

    Lots of great big growth underway or planned for South Park so I'm not at all surprised to see some new action there.

    We've also lost everything here to gentrification and 'mixed' use. The only real gay dance bar left is Axxis, which is about 1/4 the size that our big bars used to be. All the rest, aside from a few neighborhood bars (similar to Roosterfish in Venice), are all mixed now.

    The fun days are gone. I'll argue that we had far more fun when we were the discriminated against uncool underclass and didn't yet have the electronic means of communication that we have today. The only way we had to make contact is to go make contact and that we did.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14345

    Jan 03, 2016 7:47 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    ELNathB said
    runner1701 saidHow's the Redline? I like lounges for their laid-back atmosphere, I'm a bit too old to enjoy the *thump*thump*thump* of the clubs. There are few gay places in OC and I think nothing in Irvine, where my bf lives. I recently learned that it's mostly conservative Christian. I'm moving down there later this month to be closer to school and will definitely miss the valley.




    I haven't been yet, I just learned of all these places this weekend



    I think I remember hearing about 740 from before I left LA, but yeah, all the others are new to me.

    And sad to see it actually happen with Arena / Circus as it's been close to ten years since I first talked to Gene about doing something with the site.

    Lots of great big growth underway or planned for South Park so I'm not at all surprised to see some new action there.

    We've also lost everything here to gentrification and 'mixed' use. The only real gay dance bar left is Axxis, which is about 1/4 the size that our big bars used to be. All the rest, aside from a few neighborhood bars (similar to Roosterfish in Venice), are all mixed now.

    The fun days are gone. I'll argue that we had far more fun when we were the discriminated against uncool underclass and didn't yet have the electronic means of communication that we have today. The only way we had to make contact is to go make contact and that we did.
    Better days are ahead for the GLB community. We are fully assimilated and accepted. The horrible old days of distrust and hatred are over for the most part. When I stepped into a gay bar for the first time it was October 1989 and the front windows were all sealed up with metal curtains. The bar was Cafe Rumors on Main Street on the northern edge of downtown Buffalo's theater district. It was no fun looking both ways on the street for passing cars before going into a gay night club. I harbored a fear that someone who knew me might drive by and notice me going into a gay bar. I was very cautious of my surroundings during the 80s. Buffalo had a hysterically racist, homophobic, anti feminist bigot for mayor at that time, an Irish American yellow dog democrat, James Griffin. He hated on anyone who didn't conform to his backward, ultra conservative viewpoints. Both blacks and gays took the brunt of his hatred. You think those were the good old days, well I strongly disagree with you because back than you had to hide who you really were with endless lies and half truths. Most gay men in the bars back than were deeply distrustful, arrogant, and bitchy. It was hard for a gay guy like me just starting my slow coming out journey to break into the gay community. It was no fun in those days that is for sure.
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    Jan 03, 2016 9:39 PM GMT
    runner1701 saidHow's the Redline? I like lounges for their laid-back atmosphere, I'm a bit too old to enjoy the *thump*thump*thump* of the clubs. There are few gay places in OC and I think nothing in Irvine, where my bf lives. I recently learned that it's mostly conservative Christian. I'm moving down there later this month to be closer to school and will definitely miss the valley.


    OC has been ultra-conservative since before it was OC (it's a long-ago break-off from LA County), originally mostly farmers and ranchers. That said, its conservatism has diminished somewhat since, say, the 1960s, though it's still an area where gayness will (more or less) be tolerated rather than accepted; and maybe neither tolerated nor accepted in the remaining more rustic enclaves; and I don't think it would be wise to schedule a Gay Pride parade in San Juan Capistrano. The conservatism now is less Christian-tinged--more just political conservatism. Lots of 1%-ers, who are split between conservative rich and liberal rich. OC also has a very large Vietnamese immigrant and heritage community--not sure how gayness is accepted in that culture. All in all, the OC gay experience is still a fairly covert one, something of a blast from the past.
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    Jan 03, 2016 9:57 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    freedomisntfree said
    ELNathB said
    runner1701 saidHow's the Redline? I like lounges for their laid-back atmosphere, I'm a bit too old to enjoy the *thump*thump*thump* of the clubs. There are few gay places in OC and I think nothing in Irvine, where my bf lives. I recently learned that it's mostly conservative Christian. I'm moving down there later this month to be closer to school and will definitely miss the valley.




    I haven't been yet, I just learned of all these places this weekend



    I think I remember hearing about 740 from before I left LA, but yeah, all the others are new to me.

    And sad to see it actually happen with Arena / Circus as it's been close to ten years since I first talked to Gene about doing something with the site.

    Lots of great big growth underway or planned for South Park so I'm not at all surprised to see some new action there.

    We've also lost everything here to gentrification and 'mixed' use. The only real gay dance bar left is Axxis, which is about 1/4 the size that our big bars used to be. All the rest, aside from a few neighborhood bars (similar to Roosterfish in Venice), are all mixed now.

    The fun days are gone. I'll argue that we had far more fun when we were the discriminated against uncool underclass and didn't yet have the electronic means of communication that we have today. The only way we had to make contact is to go make contact and that we did.
    Better days are ahead for the GLB community. We are fully assimilated and accepted. The horrible old days of distrust and hatred are over for the most part. When I stepped into a gay bar for the first time it was October 1989 and the front windows were all sealed up with metal curtains. The bar was Cafe Rumors on Main Street on the northern edge of downtown Buffalo's theater district. It was no fun looking both ways on the street for passing cars before going into a gay night club. I harbored a fear that someone who knew me might drive by and notice me going into a gay bar. I was very cautious of my surroundings during the 80s. Buffalo had a hysterically racist, homophobic, anti feminist bigot for mayor at that time, an Irish American yellow dog democrat, James Griffin. He hated on anyone who didn't conform to his backward, ultra conservative viewpoints. Both blacks and gays took the brunt of his hatred. You think those were the good old days, well I strongly disagree with you because back than you had to hide who you really were with endless lies and half truths. Most gay men in the bars back than were deeply distrustful, arrogant, and bitchy. It was hard for a gay guy like me just starting my slow coming out journey to break into the gay community. It was no fun in those days that is for sure.


    1989 ??? Why'd you wait? You missed the fun days.

    As I've said many time, I burst out in 1970 during my junior year of high school. I told everyone. The shock value was priceless. Next line after introducing myself and stating my name was "I'm a queer" then later "I'm a fag". When the word 'gay' became the cool thing to say, I told folks, call me a fag, queer or homo, but don't ever call me gay. I hate that word and still do.

    We had great big huge bars in those days and even on very cold winter days had a hella line of 30 - 45 minutes just to get in, they were so crowded .... thinking the Kismet and Garage here in Columbus. Even a suck ass town such as Dayton had a bar that once was a Krogers store so 60,000 to 80,000 sq ft. Ok, I admit we couldn't quite fill that one.

    Even the earlier days in LA (I moved there in 1980) the capital of queerdom, I had a great time. Bars such as Faces (for rice queens), Odyssey, Studio One, etc.

    Then queerness became socially acceptable and the fun slowly stopped. Much more fun being the social outcast.
  • Sincityfan

    Posts: 409

    Jan 04, 2016 12:35 AM GMT
    the gentrification of dtla started years ago- before the gays. a new building opens every year.. there's a target, whole foods, and a gold's gym down there.
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Jan 04, 2016 1:09 AM GMT
    Yeah, WeHo is dying. City Council has completely sold out to corporate developers, who are pricing out the lower-income, typically 45-under gays who can increasingly not afford to live in WeHo. Pretty sad.

    As for The Abbey, it needs to stop billing itself as the world's best gay bar -- there was a time when that was true, but it went downhill after Cooley sold to SBE which brought in the go-go dancers. Now it's a pretentious tourist trap, a straight bar with a gay them, like they took every lod gay stereotype, put into a blender, then sprayed the finished product all over the bar.

    Bar10 and Revolver are trying to hold down the "upscale semi-dive gay bar" niche and are pretty much the only cool places left in WeHo. Both have a very Boystown, Chicago vibe. I wonder if the downtown bars are similar.

    WeHo is still a convenient place to live if you can afford it, based on proximity to everything (halfway between downtown and the beach, easy to get to LAX, close to The Valley etc) but as far as the bar/restaurant goes WeHo is pretty awful nowadays. Tacky Andrew Christian wearing queens, drugged out circuit boys, Inland Empire trash, lecherous Hollywood pimps, obnoxious tourists, and drunk girls. Rarely go out here anymore.

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    Jan 04, 2016 1:41 AM GMT
    Sincityfan saidthe gentrification of dtla started years ago- before the gays. a new building opens every year.. there's a target, whole foods, and a gold's gym down there.




    I know that part, point is the housing crisis, that is building in San Francisco, is driving the changes in DTLA.

    You know, people complain, loudly, the mayor of SF talks to the mayor of WeHo, LA and they both talk to the mayor of Sacramento who then all of them talk to Governor Brown who then talks to members of congress for these districts, then they all come up with 'plan' to deal with the original problem, SF housing and the residents who are being displaced.

    If the West Hollywood Factory/Ultra Suede and French Market Place sites do not survive demolition and redevelopment, I predict this major change to boys town LA will be the catalyst and push to move or 'relocate' the minority gay community to DTLA. The 'plan' is to turn these places into shopping and retail spaces which will require parking which is already a huge WeHo problem to begin with. Retail and shopping brings more straight people in than does gay bars (example: Beverly Center), the Santa Monica/Robertson gay corner will be forever changed with more straight people than ever crowding out the minority gays.

    Could you imagine the annual LA Gay Pride Parade and Festival going on somewhere in the finance district of downtown LA? More room, more people and more parking? The city of Long Beach, CA already holds their June gay pride in very spacious downtown Long Beach, not its gayborhood of Belmont Shore. Just imagine West Hollywood Halloween Carnival taking place in the same downtown LA spot?

    With the influx of ousted SF gay residents, LA's gay community is about to get much bigger. The city of West Hollywood cant handle anymore gay residents especially with the straight gentrification push going on. Gay people will work in West Hollywood, but will live in DTLA because they cant afford to live in WeHo, same problem in SF icon_confused.gif



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    Jan 04, 2016 1:54 AM GMT
    TroyAthlete saidYeah, WeHo is dying. City Council has completely sold out to corporate developers, who are pricing out the lower-income, typically 45-under gays who can increasingly not afford to live in WeHo. Pretty sad.

    As for The Abbey, it needs to stop billing itself as the world's best gay bar -- there was a time when that was true, but it went downhill after Cooley sold to SBE which brought in the go-go dancers. Now it's a pretentious tourist trap, a straight bar with a gay them, like they took every lod gay stereotype, put into a blender, then sprayed the finished product all over the bar.

    Bar10 and Revolver are trying to hold down the "upscale semi-dive gay bar" niche and are pretty much the only cool places left in WeHo. Both have a very Boystown, Chicago vibe. I wonder if the downtown bars are similar.

    WeHo is still a convenient place to live if you can afford it, based on proximity to everything (halfway between downtown and the beach, easy to get to LAX, close to The Valley etc) but as far as the bar/restaurant goes WeHo is pretty awful nowadays. Tacky Andrew Christian wearing queens, drugged out circuit boys, Inland Empire trash, lecherous Hollywood pimps, obnoxious tourists, and drunk girls. Rarely go out here anymore.





    Exactly

    The annual, Santa Monica Blvd, WeHo Halloween Carnival is a prime example. I went every year for 10 years (starting 2002), my last time there was 2012. Too many obnoxious straights and their baby strollers, if the city wants to keep this party going, they might as well now move this party to Sunset Blvd, near the Roxy and Whisky icon_rolleyes.gif


  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1034

    Jan 04, 2016 2:13 AM GMT
    Kinda surprised you haven't heard about these places till now. I'm way out of the mainstream gay loop in L.A. and I've known about them since last spring/summer.

    The Golden Gopher, by the way, gets a mixed crowd but is not ostensibly a gay bar.

    And I hope this doesn't burst your bubble, but DTLA was already becoming the latest hip place for str8 people before these places even opened. A friend was in a band that played several dates at Casey's Irish Pub (on South Grand) over the last couple years. I was amazed when I'd go hear them at how jammed the streets were with carousing str8 people, and how many hopping night spots they had.

    I remember when DTLA was just Al's Bar, and a bunch of homeless guys sleeping on flattened-out cardboard boxes outside the shelter on 6th St.
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    Jan 04, 2016 2:48 AM GMT
    bro4bro saidKinda surprised you haven't heard about these places till now. I'm way out of the mainstream gay loop in L.A. and I've known about them since last spring/summer.

    The Golden Gopher, by the way, gets a mixed crowd but is not ostensibly a gay bar.

    And I hope this doesn't burst your bubble, but DTLA was already becoming the latest hip place for str8 people before these places even opened. A friend was in a band that played several dates at Casey's Irish Pub (on South Grand) over the last couple years. I was amazed when I'd go hear them at how jammed the streets were with carousing str8 people, and how many hopping night spots they had.

    I remember when DTLA was just Al's Bar, and a bunch of homeless guys sleeping on flattened-out cardboard boxes outside the shelter on 6th St.




    Yeah, that Logo series above, DTLA, was released Oct 2012 but I didn't watch any of it until like a year and half later into early 2014 when I caught it on Netflix. There were no gay bars downtown when Logo released this series

    I think originally, city leaders wanted to do something with the growing homeless population. Recent years there has been a severe 'crackdown' and 'cleanup' by LAPD.

    I suppose part of that plan was to 'redevelop' certain downtown areas, forcing the homeless into LA neighborhood distribution. But now with the SF housing crisis, that is forcing residential movement within the state, there is now a housing 'need', among working people, like never before

    In CA, gay people know where to live, that is the big cities. SF, LA, SD. Its too bad that more CA cities are not just as gay friendly. We wouldn't be forced into the big cities and enclaves. You heard about the gay bars downtown LA last year summer? That is only like 6 months ago, not like they have been there 10 years. As I have already said, these establishments are not even in gay publications. I found them by doing a Google search for Los Angeles gay bars. Of course the usual WeHo bars showed up in the same search, but when I pan the map, the push pin found these gay bars DTLA. Im guessing these bars have been there for about a year then, as far as timeframe goes, that is nothing, that is only the beginning

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    Jan 04, 2016 5:02 AM GMT
    Do you guys think Hillcrest in SD will be the next SF or WeHo? It's still somewhat affordable down there, isn't it? Or what about areas near there like University Heights or North Park? I want to get a job in SD after I graduate from b-school. The traffic is nowhere near as horrendous as LA and the weather is perfect.
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    Jan 04, 2016 5:56 AM GMT
    ELNathB said
    TroyAthlete saidYeah, WeHo is dying. City Council has completely sold out to corporate developers, who are pricing out the lower-income, typically 45-under gays who can increasingly not afford to live in WeHo. Pretty sad.

    As for The Abbey, it needs to stop billing itself as the world's best gay bar -- there was a time when that was true, but it went downhill after Cooley sold to SBE which brought in the go-go dancers. Now it's a pretentious tourist trap, a straight bar with a gay them, like they took every lod gay stereotype, put into a blender, then sprayed the finished product all over the bar.

    Bar10 and Revolver are trying to hold down the "upscale semi-dive gay bar" niche and are pretty much the only cool places left in WeHo. Both have a very Boystown, Chicago vibe. I wonder if the downtown bars are similar.

    WeHo is still a convenient place to live if you can afford it, based on proximity to everything (halfway between downtown and the beach, easy to get to LAX, close to The Valley etc) but as far as the bar/restaurant goes WeHo is pretty awful nowadays. Tacky Andrew Christian wearing queens, drugged out circuit boys, Inland Empire trash, lecherous Hollywood pimps, obnoxious tourists, and drunk girls. Rarely go out here anymore.





    Exactly

    The annual, Santa Monica Blvd, WeHo Halloween Carnival is a prime example. I went every year for 10 years (starting 2002), my last time there was 2012. Too many obnoxious straights and their baby strollers, if the city wants to keep this party going, they might as well now move this party to Sunset Blvd, near the Roxy and Whisky icon_rolleyes.gif



    As we're all aware, there's massive development downtown, unlike anything ever before in LA.

    This is from a year or so ago so some of this is now done, most underway, and some still in the planning/approval stages.

    http://www.ladowntownnews.com/development/downtown-development-a-rundown-on-projects/article_772339f2-3dd9-11e4-b43b-2b2ab7a43593.html

    94 projects in all !!!!!!!!!
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    Jan 04, 2016 6:01 AM GMT
    runner1701 saidDo you guys think Hillcrest in SD will be the next SF or WeHo? It's still somewhat affordable down there, isn't it? Or what about areas near there like University Heights or North Park? I want to get a job in SD after I graduate from b-school. The traffic is nowhere near as horrendous as LA and the weather is perfect.


    If you're talking about rents, take a look at www.zumper.com which is sort of a consolidator of all of the for rent sites.

    I haven't really taken a look at San Diego before, but from just a quick glance it would appear that the rents are similar to the valley, so cheaper than LA's west side, certainly cheaper than SF.
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    Jan 04, 2016 6:18 AM GMT
    Gay Marriage!

    No need for oddball cities anymore.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 04, 2016 6:23 AM GMT
    2Bnaked saidGay Marriage!

    No need for oddball cities anymore.




    Not quite, you can still be fired from your job in many states, counties and cites across the US

    We are not done yet icon_rolleyes.gif

  • bladeaddict

    Posts: 93

    Jan 04, 2016 6:26 AM GMT


    "All the rest, aside from a few neighborhood bars (similar to Roosterfish in Venice), are all mixed now. "

    Roosterfish is barely gay anymore ... very mixed. In fact, it's mostly straight when I've been there the last few months. Only the art on the walls and the infamous men's room ceiling would clue you in to it's history.