Generation X helped pave the way for LGBT rights

  • metta

    Posts: 39134

    Jan 04, 2016 3:34 AM GMT
    Generation X helped pave the way for LGBT rights

    http://www.sgvtribune.com/social-affairs/20160103/generation-x-helped-pave-the-way-for-lgbt-rights
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    Jan 04, 2016 4:50 AM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    I'd imagine all the living generations and even those leading up to Stonewall had a hand in this. Even after Gen X, the Twitter Generation, which is curious because we started off with bumper stickers and then after all this incredible technological development, here we are again, twitting bumper sticker mentality. Oh well, not all experiments are a success.

    But what gets me is a statement like this from the article:

    "While some 40  years passed before a majority of Gallup survey respondents were OK with mixed-race marriages, the swing from a majority being opposed to same-sex marriage to the majority finding it acceptable was a mere decade."


    Mere bullshit!

    Even though we were mostly just trying for some legality and legitimacy to be, you know, alive in public (seemed a logical first step) I hardly think that can be divorced from marriage issues later. Never mind that we had our first attempts of marriage back in the 70s. Googling...

    http://gaymarriage.procon.org/view.timeline.php?timelineID=000030
    "On May 18, 1970, two University of Minnesota students, Richard John 'Jack' Baker and James Michael McConnell applied to Hennepin County District Court clerk Gerald Nelson for a marriage license. He denied the application, because the applicants both were men.

    Baker and McConnell sued Nelson, claiming Minnesota law on marriage made no mention of gender. The trial court was not impressed with the argument, agreeing with Nelson. The state Supreme Court agreed with the lower court. When Baker-McConnell went to the U.S. Supreme Court, the couple was rebuffed again...

    Baker v. Nelson has been used in other states as precedent to block efforts at marriage equality."


    So I count 45 years, not 10, on that alone.

    To take Gallup alone, their info shows 19 years of their surveying. Though we certainly know what the consensus was in the 70s by court rulings alone, never mind memory alone.

    And here's 19 years of Gallup on the issue, not merely 10 as the article says...

    http://www.gallup.com/poll/117328/marriage.aspx

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    So when someone says that the shift took place only within the last decade, that the fuck is ageism. Because not only the last 10 years count.

    Yeah, it took 10 years if you only count from 10 years ago. Or 20 years if you count from 20 years ago. Or 45 years if you go back to our original application for marriage. And that, only if we go back that far in this fight out of the closet and into society.

    It only took a decade? Yeah right. Time sure does fly when you've just spent 45 years fighting homophobia. Seems like 10.
  • tazzari

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    Jan 04, 2016 5:05 AM GMT
    Great - but some of us a generation older did some paving, too.
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    Jan 04, 2016 1:02 PM GMT
    tazzari saidGreat - but some of us a generation older did some paving, too.


    Yes that's true. Actually gay rights have been there for centuries across civilizations. It was believed Assyrians having sex with some of the same gender will bring good fortune. There are Assyrian texts containing prayers and divinity for homosexual couples. Homosexuality was widely acknowledged and practised in India during the times of Veda and Chandela dynasty. I have also read of homosexual customs and practice in Hellenic times.

    Just goes on to show how fragile our gains are. What rights we have today can be easily taken by future generations.
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    Jan 04, 2016 5:40 PM GMT
    Yes, Gen X played a part, so the article's premise, however shallow it is, is true but hardly complete. The modern gay rights movement can trace its roots to Magnus Hirschfeld, who was an active proponent of gay rights in Imperial Germany in the late XIX Century. The movement gained momentum thru the Weimar Republic, but petered out under the Nazis, only to be revived post-WW2. Activists - real ones, not the poseurs of the present day - renewed and continued the struggle in the West during the '50s, until it fully bloomed in the late '60s. So, once again, we see that it's not just "all about me," as Gen X and, worse, many "Millennials" like to think of themselves.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jan 04, 2016 6:22 PM GMT
    I always have considered gen xers to be way more homophobic than those who came after them, but that's entirely based on extensive personal experience, as someone born in 1979.
  • metta

    Posts: 39134

    Jan 04, 2016 6:28 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI always have considered gen xers to be way more homophobic than those who came after them, but that's entirely based on extensive personal experience, as someone born in 1979.


    Your comment is true. But Generation X was less homophobic than previous generations. It is the Generation X demographic where it started to become less than half of them being homophobic. I think that is the significance that the author is making. And I'm sure that the generation younger than yours is less homophobic than your generation.
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    Jan 04, 2016 6:30 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI always have considered gen xers to be way more homophobic than those who came after them, but that's entirely based on extensive personal experience, as someone born in 1979.


    What's the secret to your fountain of youth? I would have guessed you are 26.

    By the way, Gen X is usually considered as those born between 1960-1980. You are gen X

  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Jan 04, 2016 6:31 PM GMT
    metta said
    HottJoe saidI always have considered gen xers to be way more homophobic than those who came after them, but that's entirely based on extensive personal experience, as someone born in 1979.


    Your comment is true. But Generation X was less homophobic than previous generations. It is the Generation X demographic where it stated to become less than half of them being homophobic. I think that is the significance that the author is making.


    I like to think that my generation (b. 194icon_cool.gif "paved the way" for Gen X. I was out in the early 70's, and I know that changed a lot of minds. It's been an evolution since WWII, and really, no one generation can claim all the credit.
  • metta

    Posts: 39134

    Jan 04, 2016 6:33 PM GMT
    ^
    Definitely true!
  • HottJoe

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    Jan 04, 2016 7:36 PM GMT
    ricky1987 said
    HottJoe saidI always have considered gen xers to be way more homophobic than those who came after them, but that's entirely based on extensive personal experience, as someone born in 1979.


    What's the secret to your fountain of youth? I would have guessed you are 26.

    By the way, Gen X is usually considered as those born between 1960-1980. You are gen X


    Thanks. I'm just really into fitness and skincare, which has done wonders for me. But I definitely feel that decade between 26 year olds and me, even if it's not obvious at first glance.

    And, yes, I did say I have extensive personal experience with gen xers for a reason. I'll always be a young gen xer, but I'll never be a millenial. I didn't even have my first email account until I was 21 and living in NYC.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jan 04, 2016 8:19 PM GMT
    I agree with this one. I always got the feeling that for some people, I was the first gay person they knew and made it easier for the people after me.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14360

    Jan 04, 2016 10:53 PM GMT
    metta saidGeneration X helped pave the way for LGBT rights

    http://www.sgvtribune.com/social-affairs/20160103/generation-x-helped-pave-the-way-for-lgbt-rights
    To a certain, limited extent. Like the Baby Boomers before them, Generation X also had a fairly large conservative component that helped oppose gay rights. If any generation helped get us into full acceptance, it was primarily the Millennials.
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    Jan 04, 2016 11:09 PM GMT
    I thought gen x started in 1965, which is why those like me born in the first half of that decade are the youngest of the "boomers."
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    Jan 04, 2016 11:15 PM GMT
    I think LGBT rights moved so quickly because of mass telecommunication (internet), which allowed groups of activists to form at unprecedented rates.
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    Jan 04, 2016 11:33 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI think LGBT rights moved so quickly because of mass telecommunication (internet), which allowed groups of activists to form at unprecedented rates.


    Well, besides that I'd hardly call our struggle quick since I remember fighting homophobia most of my long life and while I don't recall much activism by tweeting moving the movement along, I would agree that electronics certainly accelerated things but less by activism which it should have been (picture ACT UP had they then today's social media) but I do think that it made us, made gay more accessible and that helped acceptance.

    It wasn't just us in the news (often negatively portrayed or simply by coverage of negative events), it was no longer just a few TV spots be they on Soap or Maude or All in the Family, or even Will and Grace. Social media put the gay on everyone's desk and then in everyone's pocket. And we always did know what to do from there.
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    Jan 04, 2016 11:38 PM GMT
    I can say with all sincerity. Individuals born 1960's and shortly afterwards had a great deal of barriers to overcome. I remember New York and the surrounding areas constantly seeing on the news people being locked up from gay bars, from protest and hate crimes. These guys of that era risked literally their lives to stand up for gay rights.
    Yet, hardly no one stood up and take notice of the wrong doing. I think after the AIDS epidemic in the 80's and what followed was the general population became more compassionate maybe a little more receptive to hear and learn about the issues facing the gay community . Which in turn paved the way for those who were making strides for gay rights. Each generation took the torch and benefit from the previous generations success and failures.
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    Jan 04, 2016 11:43 PM GMT
    ^^very much so and I've read similar things in the past. Just googling real quick:

    http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view?docId=ft7t1nb59n&chunk.id=d0e5346&toc.depth=1&brand=ucpress
    Legitimation through Disaster: AIDS and the Gay Movement

    ...a paradox and its political impact. Although the AIDS epidemic has occurred in a period when social conservatives have been politically dominant in most Western societies—increasing the stigma against homosexuals and homosexuality—it has also translated into much greater recognition of the homosexual community and a homosexual movement, in most Western democracies.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 05, 2016 12:08 AM GMT
    tazzari saidGreat - but some of us a generation older did some paving, too.


    Right! I did.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 05, 2016 12:15 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidI think LGBT rights moved so quickly because of mass telecommunication (internet), which allowed groups of activists to form at unprecedented rates.


    That did make a big difference.

    In 1975, when I founded Integrity Twin Cities, which was the Minneapolis - St. Paul of the national organization for gay men and women in the Episcopal Church, there was no Internet. Our newsletter had to be typed on stencils and a mimeograph machine used to make copies. Then, they had to be mailed. With the Internet, communication became much easier.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14360

    Jan 05, 2016 2:16 AM GMT
    metta said
    HottJoe saidI always have considered gen xers to be way more homophobic than those who came after them, but that's entirely based on extensive personal experience, as someone born in 1979.


    Your comment is true. But Generation X was less homophobic than previous generations. It is the Generation X demographic where it started to become less than half of them being homophobic. I think that is the significance that the author is making. And I'm sure that the generation younger than yours is less homophobic than your generation.
    Not necessarily true Metta, Generation X was not all that less homophobic than the baby boomers. The overwhelming majority of my friends were Generation Xers and they were mostly very conservative. Most of the guys I served with in the Army were either junior boomers or Generation X and most of these two groups were quite conservative and homophobic. It is the Millennials that were the first demographic to be majority in our favor.
  • metta

    Posts: 39134

    Jan 05, 2016 2:27 AM GMT
    ^
    I was talking about from a statistical standpoint. There are of course variations within those statistics.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14360

    Jan 05, 2016 2:42 AM GMT
    metta said^
    I was talking about from a statistical standpoint. There are of course variations within those statistics.
    Even from a statistical standpoint, most Generation Xers were still quite conservative and not all that different from the baby boomers. There are some differences between the boomers and the Xers but both generations were pretty conservative and quite homophobic in certain instances.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Jan 05, 2016 6:07 AM GMT
    My guess is that whoever was an adult with the privilege of spare time on their hands around NYC at the height of the aids crisis and did something about it, was mostly responsible for most of the work. That was probably the highest success:political-cost ratio (earlier times having less success and higher cost, and later times more success but less political cost)
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jan 05, 2016 6:19 AM GMT
    Apparition saidMy guess is that whoever was an adult with the privilege of spare time on their hands around NYC at the height of the aids crisis and did something about it, was mostly responsible for most of the work. That was probably the highest success:political-cost ratio (earlier times having less success and higher cost, and later times more success but less political cost)

    ^^
    This .... the road was paved by our dead and dying ... later generations help by jumping on and continuing and expanding from what already started. Sad to say, but if it hadn't been for HIV, a lot of us would probably still be living in closets ... but all the generations deserve credit ... it sort of all began when Rock Hudson came out and said he had AIDS and then Hollywood started giving us a platform