Can you ever really quit?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 3:00 AM GMT
    I quit smoking. For good this time. To clarify, I've quit off and on for a couple years. I haven't smoked since new years. I don't even normally want to. But every now and then........

    I'll see someone light up on tv, or I'll walk past someone smoking, and its what I assume being possessed feels like. I haven't broken down yet....

    But really, do you ever get over that? That calm that washes over you when the nicotene kicks in? Those five minutes of smoke break that you just block the world out? Oh I know all the health problems from it, but god damnit, sometimes, I think an early death is worth it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 5:03 AM GMT
    Best thing youve ever done for yourself. You may not know it now but trust me youre better off for it now and in the long run. Congratulations and good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 5:11 AM GMT
    Nothing will get to quit smoking like getting lung cancer or COPD.

    My mom is on oxygen 24 x 7 and quit 30 years ago.

    My good friend, Dave Kenley, of Chandler, AZ died at 51 because he wouldn't stop smoking.

    Properly used, cigarettes WILL kill you.

    Once you change your lifestyle, and understand how good you can feel, the addiction you have will pass.

    Just man-up and change your life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 5:12 AM GMT
    Matterych saidI think an early death is worth it.


    When they take our your larynx, can I watch and put it on youtube?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 5:15 AM GMT
    I forgot.

    Barry Fiel, from Plano, TX, and a hockey referee friend of mine, just had his larynx taken out a few weeks ago. Now, he gets a buzzy, friendly, little voice.

    Gives you something to look forward to.

    Are you really so weak of discipline you can't stop?

    Would you rather be a burden to your loved ones, and to society?

    Would your rather smell, be sick more, die younger, and be unable to exercise over tobacco?

    Is your addiction worth that?

    If it is, you're on the wrong site. This is about disciplined Real Jocks.

    You need smokersaredieing.com
  • OptimusMatt

    Posts: 1124

    Feb 05, 2009 5:19 AM GMT
    Go go champix - may be a bitch out but I'm 3 weeks smoke-free icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 5:21 AM GMT
    smokers lung.jpg

    4.png

    sample.jpg

    Does that nicotine buzz still feel good? icon_razz.gif
  • jlly_rnchr

    Posts: 1759

    Feb 05, 2009 5:24 AM GMT
    I quit for my 25th birthday, and was good for nearly half a year, but then the holidays hit last year and I started having a couple here and there.

    Then I started consistently having one a night.

    Now I'm at 2 to 3 a day. I am shady about it, I don't have any during the day because my co-workers will shame me to death, and I don't have them when I see my family for the same reason.

    I'm still smoking so much less than I did, so few that I don't think it will be hard to quit again. But I'm not sure I want to. When I get off the train and see smokers light up outside, I really want to join in. Plus I miss the cig breaks at work when I'm miserable. Non-smokers have no instant stress relief that matches a cigarette.

    And I'm certain that no matter how many months or years I have been quit, I will always want one when I'm drinking.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 5:25 AM GMT
    Think of my mom, tied to an oxygen machine 24 x 7. That will almost certainly be your plight if you continue.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 5:50 AM GMT
    The key to staying quit from any behavior or addiction is to make the decision not to pick up a cigarrette when a craving hits. Your mind will be occupied 5-10 minutes by an addictive thought at most, but actually engaging the addiction can cost you years.

    I'd suggest doing lots of research, making cost benefit lists and all that. I think you'll actually see that the temporary dopamine rush really isn't a benefit. It's doing more harm than good to your brain chemistry.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 7:38 AM GMT
    flex89 saidsmokers lung.jpg

    4.png

    sample.jpg

    Does that nicotine buzz still feel good? icon_razz.gif


    I'll take the topic Neck Cancer for 1000 Mr. Trebek
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 10:42 AM GMT
    Give the guy a break. I know how you feel man. I still light up occasionally. Like when I'm out at the bar drinking, it's the atmosphere. I find what best works for me is just staying away from people that smoke. Or if a friend lights up, ask them to go outside or put it out. Might make them bitch a little, but it's easier to quit when you're not around it. Good luck on staying away.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 10:59 AM GMT
    flex89 saidsmokers lung.jpg

    4.png

    sample.jpg

    Does that nicotine buzz still feel good? icon_razz.gif


    You do realise that shock/fear based persuasion works well but only over a short period of time, with people eventually regaining their original point of view?

    The best way to provide a long time change in believe/behaviour is to cause serious in depth thought about the subject. In this case not statistics or that bullshit, but almost down to the chemical reactions biological information. If the person concerned would be able to follow, understand or even want to engage in that type of activity is another thing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 11:26 AM GMT
    I started smoking when I was 14. I smoked until October, 2006 when I put out my cigarette thinking to myself, "this is disgusting."

    I still want to smoke sometimes, but I know that if I do, I'll have to start all over again.

    Good luck and hang in there!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 12:04 PM GMT
    Sorry, but I don't think an early death is worth it. After seeing all the complications that smoking has caused my father (who, ironically, is an oncologist) it was very easy for me to crush out my last cigarette. 10 years now without one.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 3:03 PM GMT
    I really quit smoking in August 1996. For a few years, I used to have occasional dreams in which I was smoking, but they eventually stopped. I'll never smoke again. I'll never drink again, either.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 3:31 PM GMT
    those pics looks like they came right off of the cigarette cartons from canada...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 3:35 PM GMT
    I quit 8 years ago on Feb 1. I still get a craving every now and then but the craving isn't strong and it only lasts for a couple of seconds. The cravings are lighter and come less often the more time goes by, at least for me.

    If i get the craving when someone is smoking close to me I usually just have to smell their clothes to remember what it is that i'm missing......which is absolutely nothing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 3:42 PM GMT
    It definitely gets easier. Hang in there, you will be alright!
  • cowboyupnorth

    Posts: 264

    Feb 05, 2009 3:52 PM GMT
    I started smoking at 14 and always smoked at least a pack a day.

    In my twenties I was able to quite 4 times each for a bout a yr. I would re-start because I would convince myself that I could smoke one a day, or only while drinking. That might work for others but it only lasted 4 days for me.

    During most of my thirties I smoked 2 or 3 packs a day. I finally quite Aug 15th 2005. I sometimes think about smoking but, I hate the way smoking controlled my life.

    Friends who have not smoked for 20 yrs tell me they sometimes still crave them. Just remember this two shall pass.

    Things that help me not return is remembering

    Smoking controlled my life, I had to spend my breaks out smoking instead of doing other things, I would have to always work around smoking, now even at airports, large conferences etc smoking has really become a hassle.

    I looked up the health benefits to quitting and feel encouraged, next yr for example my chances of having a heart attack returns to that of someone who has never smoked.

    It cost so much to smoke, use that money for gym equipment, or other toys

    Good luck, you can stay a non smoker, if I did anyone can
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 4:04 PM GMT
    omg those pictures are disgusting. I quit for 6 months then started again. I wanna stop again so i can properly workout without loosing my breath after 5 mins.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 4:16 PM GMT
    I quit 90 days ago. I used the nicotine patch and accupuncture. Getting as much sleep as possible has helped too.

    Good luck !
  • cowboyupnorth

    Posts: 264

    Feb 05, 2009 4:36 PM GMT
    jlly_rnchr said
    Non-smokers have no instant stress relief that matches a cigarette.

    And I'm certain that no matter how many months or years I have been quit, I will always want one when I'm drinking.


    Their are several easy technique to instantly engage the relaxation response

    I think RJ had an article on breathing recently. http://realjock.com/article/1335/

    Also here is a tutorial on the Alternate Nostril Breath (also known as U-Breath), which can help you turn off an overactive fight-or-flight response and instead activate your body's relaxation response. It's really easy and often works in as little as 1 to 3 minutes.

    http://www.practicalyoga.tv/shownewsletteredh.asp?newsletterID=59348109

    http://www.practicalyoga.tv/playworkout.asp?yqID=1925123&target=2
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2009 5:16 AM GMT
    Matterych said
    But really, do you ever get over that? That calm that washes over you when the nicotene kicks in? Those five minutes of smoke break that you just block the world out? Oh I know all the health problems from it, but god damnit, sometimes, I think an early death is worth it.


    No, as far as I can tell, you never get over it. I was a smoker for only about 6 years, and smoked 2 packs a day in my 'prime'. I haven't had one for 2 years. There are times when I'd like to stab and kill a smoker to scrape the nicotine out from under their fingernails (or just bum a smoke, one of the two), but you just have to be persistent. But so far, the cravings have not fully gone away, they're just subsided. The first 2 months were hell. Good luck man, and hang out with people who don't smoke, and won't let you smoke around them. Hanging out with smokers is one of the easiest ways to get back into smoking.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2009 3:10 PM GMT
    Don't feel so guilty if you light up on occasion... We're only human and you are fighting a very strong addiction. Good luck