Hitler's Mein Kampf sells out instantly after being published

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    Jan 14, 2016 9:19 PM GMT
    Hitler's Mein Kampf sells out instantly after being published in Germany for first time in 70 years

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/12092029/Hitlers-Mein-Kampf-sells-out-instantly-after-being-published-in-Germany-for-first-time-in-70-years.html

    One copy of the edition, which costs £43 (64 dollars), was even reportedly put up for resale on Amazon.de for £7,521.43 (9,999.99 euros)
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    Jan 14, 2016 9:42 PM GMT
    From what I've read the Germans aren't very good about teaching their kids their history.

    Several years ago there was a poll in Germany asking if they thought that Hitler had been a good leader and a significant percentage said yes, that he had. I think it was close to 50%.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jan 14, 2016 10:58 PM GMT
    Hitler would love ISIS. We can thank terrorists for the comeback.icon_evil.gif

    I think the people who were once Christians need to look in their hearts and find Jesus.icon_cry.gif
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    Jan 14, 2016 11:58 PM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    Sam27 saidOld U.S. stamp during WWII
    image131.jpg


    Not a U.S. stamp such as a postal stamp though maybe sold in the U.S. That was a type of trinket possibly given away in exchange for donations to whatever cause. It would be more akin to today's stickers that a kid might collect, not described as a U.S. stamp.

    The first Jewish U.S. stamp was not issued until 1996

    Stamp_1996US_hanukkah.png

    The U.S. attitude towards the Jewish people during WWII was less so honored stamp, rather more so...

    index_St.Louis.jpg

    http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005267
    On May 13, 1939, the German transatlantic liner St. Louis sailed from Hamburg, Germany, for Havana, Cuba. On the voyage were 937 passengers. Almost all were Jews fleeing from the Third Reich....

    The majority of the Jewish passengers had applied for US visas, and had planned to stay in Cuba only until they could enter the United States. But by the time the St. Louis sailed, there were signs that political conditions in Cuba might keep the passengers from landing there. The US State Department in Washington, the US consulate in Havana, some Jewish organizations, and refugee agencies were all aware of the situation. The passengers themselves were not informed; most were compelled to return to Europe...

    After Cuba denied entry to the passengers on the St. Louis, the press throughout Europe and the Americas, including the United States, brought the story to millions of readers throughout the world. Though US newspapers generally portrayed the plight of the passengers with great sympathy, only a few journalists and editors suggested that the refugees be admitted into the United States....

    Sailing so close to Florida that they could see the lights of Miami, some passengers on the St. Louis cabled President Franklin D. Roosevelt asking for refuge. Roosevelt never responded. The State Department and the White House had decided not to take extraordinary measures to permit the refugees to enter the United States. A State Department telegram sent to a passenger stated that the passengers must "await their turns on the waiting list and qualify for and obtain immigration visas before they may be admissible into the United States."...
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    Jan 15, 2016 12:02 AM GMT
    meanwhile...
    http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/does-mein-kampf-remain-a-dangerous-book
    According to a 1990 Vanity Fair interview, Ivana Trump once told her lawyer Michael Kennedy that her husband, real-estate mogul Donald Trump, now a leading Republican presidential candidate, kkkept a book of Hitler's speeches near his bed.

    coincidence?
    Adolf-Hitler-and-Indian-elephant-salute-
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2016 4:58 AM GMT
    Has anyone here read it?
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    Jan 15, 2016 5:09 AM GMT
    Not for decades, and not entirely. One of the middle-school English teachers kept a translated copy on his book-shelf. I didn't like that guy at the time, but in hindsight, he had a number of what he probably thought were goofy tricks to provoke kids into reading. In fact, very Snape-like. Decades ahead of his time... Now I wish I could remember what other books were on that shelf.

    (RIP Alan Rickman... icon_sad.gif )
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    Jan 15, 2016 5:17 AM GMT
    I thought I'd wait for the movie...
  • psustud

    Posts: 111

    Jan 15, 2016 2:31 PM GMT
    Yikes!!
  • MarcelP

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    Jan 15, 2016 5:27 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidFrom what I've read the Germans aren't very good about teaching their kids their history.

    Several years ago there was a poll in Germany asking if they thought that Hitler had been a good leader and a significant percentage said yes, that he had. I think it was close to 50%.


    Please consider reading more than just a story about a drive-by poll in Germany. In fact Post-war Germany is notable for the many ways in which it has faced its own dark, Nazi past. If only our own country could admit to its own past failings with similar courage.
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    Jan 15, 2016 5:50 PM GMT
    You can't keep a good Mann down! icon_lol.gif

    No, that's NOT an endorsement for Hitler or anything he believed in ... except maybe the Autobahn. He was as evil and destructive as his erstwhile ally Stalin, and together they were responsible for heaping the most misery upon the most number of people during the XX Century.
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    Jan 15, 2016 10:39 PM GMT
    I don't understand why people are mad about that. Banning books doesn't have a good history as well. The Church would do it when they believed the book was evil and promoted either violence, obscenity, promiscuity, etc., or even if it was scientific works that would disagree with their religious beliefs.
    In fact the Nazi party did ban and burn books by Jewish writers and stuff.
    So, why exactly can't people read Hitler's Mein Kampf? Isn't that idea as authoritarian as nazis'?
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14295

    Jan 15, 2016 10:46 PM GMT
    MGINSD saidYou can't keep a good Mann down! icon_lol.gif

    No, that's NOT an endorsement for Hitler or anything he believed in ... except maybe the Autobahn. He was as evil and destructive as his erstwhile ally Stalin, and together they were responsible for heaping the most misery upon the most number of people during the XX Century.
    I think Josef Stalin was much worse than Hitler, that man was really sick minded especially regarding the rapid expansion of the Gulag prison camps and the horrible slave labor and endless suffering inside those camps. This is what the Kim regime's dictatorship in North Korea is based on, prison slave labor combined with starvation and suffering.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jan 15, 2016 10:47 PM GMT
    eipoika saidI don't understand why people are mad about that. Banning books doesn't have a good history as well. The Church would do it when they believed the book was evil and promoted either violence, obscenity, promiscuity, etc., or even if it was scientific works that would disagree with their religious beliefs.
    In fact the Nazi party did ban and burned books by Jewish writers and stuff.
    So, why exactly can't people read Hitler's Mein Kampf? Isn't that idea as authoritarian as nazis'?

    Yes, the article mentioned that the new annotated version hopes to demystify the hate speech in the book, so that it can be properly understood as the manifesto of a deranged megalomaniac murderer.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jan 15, 2016 10:51 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    MGINSD saidYou can't keep a good Mann down! icon_lol.gif

    No, that's NOT an endorsement for Hitler or anything he believed in ... except maybe the Autobahn. He was as evil and destructive as his erstwhile ally Stalin, and together they were responsible for heaping the most misery upon the most number of people during the XX Century.
    I think Josef Stalin was much worse than Hitler, that man was really sick minded especially regarding the rapid expansion of the Gulag prison camps and the horrible slave labor and endless suffering inside those camps. This is what the Kim regime's dictatorship in North Korea is based on, prison slave labor combined with starvation and suffering.

    I wish the West could liberate the N. Koreans.icon_sad.gif
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    Jan 16, 2016 12:34 AM GMT
    Sam27 saidOld U.S. stamp during WWII
    image131.jpg


    Nations were in more of a state of total war, where the efforts of everyone abroad and home were geared towards supporting combat. They understood that goods and services from a country supported that country's economy and thus their war machine. I think the stamp was part of a Jewish boycott of German goods across allied nations, and I remember GB did ban German and Italian goods for a time. Though the US's stance was more conservation of resources and buying American to sustain production and jobs.

    But could you imagine if that was tried today? International courts allow corporations to sue entire countries if government policies damage business prospects. Then other nations own so much US debt, or control dependent resources, we have to worry about disputes backfiring and crippling our economy.
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    Jan 16, 2016 12:36 AM GMT
    Yes I also hope they could liberated. By anyone.

    But a less ambitious wish, (and within hands!) is to increase awareness of the human, and increasingly environmental, tragedy that the DPRK means.
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    Jan 16, 2016 8:27 PM GMT
    MarcelP said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidFrom what I've read the Germans aren't very good about teaching their kids their history.

    Several years ago there was a poll in Germany asking if they thought that Hitler had been a good leader and a significant percentage said yes, that he had. I think it was close to 50%.


    Please consider reading more than just a story about a drive-by poll in Germany. In fact Post-war Germany is notable for the many ways in which it has faced its own dark, Nazi past. If only our own country could admit to its own past failings with similar courage.

    So true. Same can be said about other European nations like England, France, Belgium, Spain, Netherlands etc. I doubt kids in those counties even know 1% of the atrocities committed by their country around the world.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3515

    Jan 17, 2016 4:47 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidFrom what I've read the Germans aren't very good about teaching their kids their history.

    Several years ago there was a poll in Germany asking if they thought that Hitler had been a good leader and a significant percentage said yes, that he had. I think it was close to 50%.


    Technically, he was an AWESOME leader. Even if you don't like where he lead. As far as tactics, he made some blunders, that if he hadn't made them, Germany would have BEEN Europe in the fifties. (He should have stopped on the continent, and befriended Russia. He should also have USED the jewish physicists instead of killing them, and got nukes first, at that point he would have been invincible militarily and owned the continent)

    As much as it was bad for humanity, a guy that can take a wartorn broken country out of the depression, and conquer most of the useful world in 3 years, had to have SOME sort of leadership skills. I mean the USA can't even make afghanistan behave after two decades, and lost to vietnam. THEY have no leadership.

    ---------

    Again. not a fan, as hitler bad for humanity, but pretty good at admin.
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    Jan 17, 2016 4:40 PM GMT
    I must differ w/ you, apparition. Hitler's generals and OKW were pretty awesome - to use that word in its current and traditional military sense - but the apparatus of the Nazi state was quite inefficient, from Goering's Gestapo to Himmlers SS and all along and in between. Coordination was lacking, petty jealousies got in the way of good management, and duplication of effort was rampant. Only those bureaus which were answerable to one man, such as the SS, were the most efficient, as most terribly evidenced by the dispatch with which Jews and other Untermensch were liquidated in their camps. Hitler himself was a classic example of Bayernische Schlamperei, Bavarian sloppiness, which revealed itself in his lazy work schedule and late-night hours, usually spent lecturing interminably to those obliged to listen.

    The German Army was quite efficient and well-run, but not always so, as the Russians first, and the rest of the Allies, eventually proved in WW2. Like the Japanese Army, which it trained as Japan emerged from isolation in the late XIX Century, it was quite capable of conceiving intricate, long-range plans, but much less capable of dealing with emergent events that got in those plans' way.
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    Jan 19, 2016 2:16 AM GMT
    theantijock saidmeanwhile...
    http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/does-mein-kampf-remain-a-dangerous-book
    According to a 1990 Vanity Fair interview, Ivana Trump once told her lawyer Michael Kennedy that her husband, real-estate mogul Donald Trump, now a leading Republican presidential candidate, kkkept a book of Hitler's speeches near his bed.

    coincidence?
    Adolf-Hitler-and-Indian-elephant-salute-


    It illustrates how little you understand about Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. There really is no comparison.

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    Jan 19, 2016 3:24 AM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    theantijock saidmeanwhile...
    http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/does-mein-kampf-remain-a-dangerous-book
    According to a 1990 Vanity Fair interview, Ivana Trump once told her lawyer Michael Kennedy that her husband, real-estate mogul Donald Trump, now a leading Republican presidential candidate, kkkept a book of Hitler's speeches near his bed.

    coincidence?
    Adolf-Hitler-and-Indian-elephant-salute-


    It illustrates how little you understand about Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. There really is no comparison.


    How fascinating. And just what comparison or confusion between the 30s and 40s did you hallucinate that I made? Or is that just your convoluted syntax? Just what are you trying to say, that there's no comparison between the decades then--I ask as if I could give a flying fuck--or the decades then and current times that would signify a Republican elephant doing a nazi trunk salute out of goosestep with the fascist direction your political party seems hell-bent on taking this country?

    Regardless, I'll just bump the Ye Grande Olde American Fascism thread with ready reference for your easy perusal.