Cultural differences in travel habits

  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Jan 20, 2016 10:14 PM GMT
    Something I noticed on some of the travel threads.
    There seems to be cultural differences in travel habits with nationality.

    British people will travel anywhere and everywhere. We are not so daunted by risk. It is customary for young people to take a year off before university and travel the world.
    We are happy to go to countries that some people would find risky. A friend of mine went to Haiti. I have friends who've visited Iran, Afghanistan, Russia. (We do get some that will go to Spain and set up little Britain but these are a small minority). We like to go to countries people haven't heard of.
    The ISIS issue has had some dampening of this but we are still adventurous.

    With Australians and New Zealanders they are even more prone to travel. Travelling to Europe and beyond is almost a rite of passage for young people. Many come to London to work and visit.

    Continental Europeans seem quite happy to travel too.

    I've noticed the USA guys here seem to be a lot more cautious when it comes to travel. They won't go to places that have worse human rights than the USA, or that are too culturally different. I'm not sure if this is an age related issue or a cultural difference.

    What do you think? Are my observations correct?
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    Jan 21, 2016 4:52 AM GMT
    Fireworkz said
    What do you think? Are my observations correct?

    I cannot speak to British travel habits as you do. Perhaps it's a residual of the great age of British world exploration, when the UK was building an empire. As for US Americans, there may be some truth to your observations.

    But it varies by income & educational level. More true of the NASCAR/NFL crowd than the Harvard/Yale set. But just as well, since it does the US image no good to have that "ugly American" group going overseas, anyway.

    They're the ones who get mad when everyone else doesn't speak their own rather poor version of English, and think that shouting louder and angrier makes themselves better understood. Well, in a way it does, but not in delivering the message they think they are.

    No, I'd rather have the rebel flag wavers stay right here at home, and take trips exploring nothing more exotic than out of town football games and the Grand Ole Opry.

    Odd, because earlier in US history there was a tradition of young people taking a "Grand Tour" of Europe. Which began around the 1850s as routine Atlantic passenger travel began to become more feasible.

    I once studied hundreds of letters to home, and photographs from the 1890s through 1910s, in which young adults from Minnesota and North Dakota, of all places, documented their European travels. And perhaps you've heard of Mark Twain's book "The Innocents Abroad" from decades earlier, which may have inspired a few generations in exploring outside our borders.

    But today our country's Imperialist mistakes have made us one of the most hated nations on Earth. Though many refuse to accept that reality, except to recognize that it's dangerous for US citizens to travel in many parts of the world. Some people rationalize it to be because others are jealous of us, but the truth is we're simply despised & hated, something most Americans could never admit or accept. So it's better if we only travel to where it's safe, where they have McDonalds and things we recognize as friendly territory.
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    Jan 21, 2016 5:27 AM GMT
    Well just for one factor, it takes, like, what, fifteen minutes walk to get out of UK? It takes a very expensive plane ticket to get out of US. Unless you live close to Canadia or Mexico and can drive.

    Then, the US has a long history of xenophobic death cults. Around half the population, going by voting records. The only reason they're going to visit the rest of the world is to wage war on it. Maybe you should be content with the status quo.

    demotivation-posters-auto-297923.jpeg
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Jan 21, 2016 12:10 PM GMT
    QUOTE AUTHOR GOES HEREBut today our country's Imperialist mistakes have made us one of the most hated nations on Earth. Though many refuse to accept that reality, except to recognize that it's dangerous for US citizens to travel in many parts of the US. Some people rationalize it to be because others are jealous of us, but the truth is we're simply despised & hated, something most Americans could never admit or accept. So it's better if we only travel to where it's safe, where they have McDonalds and things we recognize as friendly territory.


    I think there are very few places where you won't find a McDonald's. There are 196 countries in the world probably only 10% despise Americans.
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Jan 21, 2016 12:19 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidWell just for one factor, it takes, like, what, fifteen minutes walk to get out of UK? It takes a very expensive plane ticket to get out of US. Unless you live close to Canadia or Mexico and can drive.

    Then, the US has a long history of xenophobic death cults. Around half the population, going by voting records. The only reason they're going to visit the rest of the world is to wage war on it. Maybe you should be content with the status quo.

    demotivation-posters-auto-297923.jpeg


    I think you are seeing only one side of your country. There are many good things that the US does for the rest of the world as well as the bad stuff.

    And it is pretty hard to walk off an island. Swim at best.
    Distance is not a issue except maybe a laziness to travel any distances.



    I've met many Europeans on both coasts of the US. We pay the same price to fly to the US as you do to Europe.
    Most flights to anywhere exotic cost $800 - $1,100. Latin America is pretty cheap for you.

    Many Brits (and the french and probably most Europeans) will have an annual holiday reasonably far away say the Caribbean, Thailand etc, and they'll have a short trip of 1-2 hours. (less affluent will do the short trips to Southern Europe) I guess we do get more vacation days so that may be an influence.
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    Jan 21, 2016 5:05 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]Art_Deco said[/cite]
    Fireworkz said
    What do you think? Are my observations correct?

    [Artless disinformational diatribe deleted.]

    Give it a rest, Art. Or, as the Brits would say, "Stuff a sock in it!"
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    Jan 21, 2016 8:34 PM GMT
    I recognize the truth of the "Ugly American" phenomenon abroad, but I disagree with Art's statement that it is just as well that the rebel flag folks stay home. Part of the Republican hold on the South and midwest is exactly because these people have never traveled. Even educated southerners and midwesterners who have never traveled have very misguided views of American exceptionalism and a "Friday night football" competitive attitude that changes if they travel. I've actually had some of my southern friends remark on how much their world view changed once they actually saw the world, or at least Europe. The Rah-rah-we're-number-1 childish attitude towards the world at least softens. At least for a while.
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Jan 22, 2016 12:33 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Fireworkz said
    What do you think? Are my observations correct?

    I cannot speak to British travel habits as you do. Perhaps it's a residual of the great age of British world exploration, when the UK was building an empire. As for US Americans, there may be some truth to your observations.

    But it varies by income & educational level. More true of the NASCAR/NFL crowd than the Harvard/Yale set. But just as well, since it does the US image no good to have that "ugly American" group going overseas, anyway.

    They're the ones who get mad when everyone else doesn't speak their own rather poor version of English, and think that shouting louder and angrier makes themselves better understood. Well, in a way it does, but not in delivering the message they think they are.

    No, I'd rather have the rebel flag wavers stay right here at home, and take trips exploring nothing more exotic than out of town football games and the Grand Ole Opry.

    Odd, because earlier in US history there was a tradition of young people taking a "Grand Tour" of Europe. Which began around the 1850s as routine Atlantic passenger travel began to become more feasible.

    I once studied hundreds of letters to home, and photographs from the 1890s through 1910s, in which young adults from Minnesota and North Dakota, of all places, documented their European travels. And perhaps you've heard of Mark Twain's book "The Innocents Abroad" from decades earlier, which may have inspired a few generations in exploring outside our borders.

    But today our country's Imperialist mistakes have made us one of the most hated nations on Earth. Though many refuse to accept that reality, except to recognize that it's dangerous for US citizens to travel in many parts of the US. Some people rationalize it to be because others are jealous of us, but the truth is we're simply despised & hated, something most Americans could never admit or accept. So it's better if we only travel to where it's safe, where they have McDonalds and things we recognize as friendly territory.


    You are a smart guy, I wouldn't say people are jealous of the US, I think its more the fact that a lot of countries think that politically the US is a bully, the government is horrendously corrupt, the military is immoral, the legal system isn't fair, the British military never accidentally kill anyone that is an ally, the people aren't open to other cultures like most other nations and think that everywhere should be like the US, it isn't. A lot of people respect money more than integrity which has nothing to do with class. To be honest, I had a great time in the US, have some great friends there but I wouldn't ever live there because it is messed up beyond belief and I think we have more freedom in the commonwealth than you guys do.
    That isn't meant to offend, the UK is far from perfect, believe me on that, as regards travelling, yeh, I think we are more adventurous than you guys but maybe because of the crime and gun culture in the US, people have in built paranoia because of that and think its like that all over the world which it isn't, my sister for example went to South America and met some yanks in the airport, they wanted to know where she was staying in which she replied that she would get a local bus on her own and walk around and find a room in one of the hostels, they thought she was mad because they thought she would get shot if she didn't have a hotel and taxi to get to it, CRAZY,
    Personally, I take each person as I find them and don't care where anyone is from, everybody has a different story or outlook on life which I find fascinating, love you all, except bonaparts of course but he's not a yank LOL
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Jan 22, 2016 12:41 AM GMT
    I am from a reasonably wealthy family and when I travel, I like to either stay in a hostel or use my tent, I don't like hotels, went on a family holiday to NYC recently and stayed in a 5* hotel overlooking the Chrysler building, the only person we spoke to in there was the girl on reception and the concierge service, it was soulless and I much prefer a hostel because you meet people from all over the world, everyone socialises no matter who you are and what you have got, I really like the types of people you meet in the hostels, if you haven't tried it then do, it may change the way you view the world because of the people you meet
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    Jan 22, 2016 2:24 AM GMT
    The USA is a HUGE country. We have beaches, mountains, glaciers, deserts, dunes, plaines, islands, farmland, urban areas, rural areas. If one wants urban sophistication one can go to NYC, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington DC for the cultural events, world-class museums, etc. If one wants old world charm one can go to New Orleans or Charleston. If one wants a bit o' Latin spice they can go to Miami. Want an island vacation? Go to Hawaii or the US Virgin Islands. Want to see glaciers and expansive natural beauty? Go to Alaska. The American Southwest is breathtakingly beautiful as are the Rockies and the Grand Tetons. We have many, many, many National Parks, monuments, battlefields, and historical sites to see. And let's not forget the close proximity of Mexico, Canada and the Caribean.

    I could go on and on but my point is is that there is sooooooo much to do and see in our own country first, it's hard to justify the time and the thousands of dollars to go overseas just to have to beg for more ice in your drink. Is ice really that scarce of a commodity in Europe? Everywhere I went they doled out the ice like it was gold. And God forbid if you had the audacity to ask for more. Mind you not being rude but simply politely asking for it. You'd swear you asked for the country's Crown Jewels. (All that was a bit light-hearted as the lack of ice was a minor inconvenience and everything else about the trip was great. It was just odd to an American that ice would be so precious. Even my foreign-born husband is stingy with the ice cubes here at home and they're free! Lol) I did get a small pebble in a sandwich in France which I can't believe was an accident.

    I'm not knocking international travel. I'd love to get back to Europe. I'd love to see Peru. I'd love to see St. Petersburg and Moscow. I'd love to see Italy. Sorry, no desire to see Iran and Afganistan; although, Turkey isn't out of the question. It's just that there is so much to do and see in our own hemisphere first it's hard to find the time and $$$. We can spend a lifetime just exploring our own backyard.

    I'd also like to have a travel companion or friend from the country or area I'm visiting in order to truly experience the culture. I once spent a week showing a young Mexican college student around New Orleans and plantation country just up river. He really appreciated the personal touch of having a local show him around. This year I'll have the good fortune of having my husband show me around his native Mexico.
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    Jan 22, 2016 2:36 AM GMT
    MGINSD said[quote][cite]Art_Deco said[/cite]
    Fireworkz said
    What do you think? Are my observations correct?

    [Artless disinformational diatribe deleted.]

    Give it a rest, Art. Or, as the Brits would say, "Stuff a sock in it!"


    Art is such a better-than-thou snob and sadly enough doesn't realize he's just as odious a character (caricature) as the people he berates.
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Jan 22, 2016 12:40 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidThe USA is a HUGE country. We have beaches, mountains, glaciers, deserts, dunes, plaines, islands, farmland, urban areas, rural areas. If one wants urban sophistication one can go to NYC, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington DC for the cultural events, world-class museums, etc. If one wants old world charm one can go to New Orleans or Charleston. If one wants a bit o' Latin spice they can go to Miami. Want an island vacation? Go to Hawaii or the US Virgin Islands. Want to see glaciers and expansive natural beauty? Go to Alaska. The American Southwest is breathtakingly beautiful as are the Rockies and the Grand Tetons. We have many, many, many National Parks, monuments, battlefields, and historical sites to see. And let's not forget the close proximity of Mexico, Canada and the Caribean.

    I could go on and on but my point is is that there is sooooooo much to do and see in our own country first, it's hard to justify the time and the thousands of dollars to go overseas just to have to beg for more ice in your drink. Is ice really that scarce of a commodity in Europe? Everywhere I went they doled out the ice like it was gold. And God forbid if you had the audacity to ask for more. Mind you not being rude but simply politely asking for it. You'd swear you asked for the country's Crown Jewels. (All that was a bit light-hearted as the lack of ice was a minor inconvenience and everything else about the trip was great. It was just odd to an American that ice would be so precious. Even my foreign-born husband is stingy with the ice cubes here at home and they're free! Lol) I did get a small pebble in a sandwich in France which I can't believe was an accident.

    I'm not knocking international travel. I'd love to get back to Europe. I'd love to see Peru. I'd love to see St. Petersburg and Moscow. I'd love to see Italy. Sorry, no desire to see Iran and Afganistan; although, Turkey isn't out of the question. It's just that there is so much to do and see in our own hemisphere first it's hard to find the time and $$$. We can spend a lifetime just exploring our own backyard.

    I'd also like to have a travel companion or friend from the country or area I'm visiting in order to truly experience the culture. I once spent a week showing a young Mexican college student around New Orleans and plantation country just up river. He really appreciated the personal touch of having a local show him around. This year I'll have the good fortune of having my husband show me around his native Mexico.



    The ice is a cultural thing. We don't really use ice to the same degree you do. When I get a drink I always tell them to put half of the ice they want to put in it.

    I've been to most of the major cities in the US and they all seem pretty similar to me. I do love the landscapes though and when I go to the US these days it is more for the landscapes than the cities. I quite like small town America too.

    But you are having a laugh about history though 500 years? Really? I went to Malta recently and they had sites from Phoenecians, the Ottomans, The Greeks, Rome and pre-history all on one small island. Your closest neighbour Mexico has much better history with the Mayan ruins.

    I guess it depends on why you like to travel. For me I like different cultures, different languages (I like to learn at least a few phrases) and a new perspective on life. I also love landscapes. I'll go anywhere that isn't too cold.



  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Jan 22, 2016 12:42 PM GMT
    interestingchap saidI am from a reasonably wealthy family and when I travel, I like to either stay in a hostel or use my tent, I don't like hotels, went on a family holiday to NYC recently and stayed in a 5* hotel overlooking the Chrysler building, the only person we spoke to in there was the girl on reception and the concierge service, it was soulless and I much prefer a hostel because you meet people from all over the world, everyone socialises no matter who you are and what you have got, I really like the types of people you meet in the hostels, if you haven't tried it then do, it may change the way you view the world because of the people you meet


    I haven't back packed for awhile but I agree with you although you tend to meet more tourists.
    I like to use airbnb these days or small hotels close to the locals. Usually I want to know what it is like to live in a country.

    If I go to a luxury hotel I feel like I need to spend more time in the hotel to get value for money.
  • eM_Jay

    Posts: 90

    Jan 22, 2016 3:53 PM GMT
    Fireworkz saidSomething I noticed on some of the travel threads.
    There seems to be cultural differences in travel habits with nationality.

    British people will travel anywhere and everywhere. We are not so daunted by risk. It is customary for young people to take a year off before university and travel the world.
    We are happy to go to countries that some people would find risky. A friend of mine went to Haiti. I have friends who've visited Iran, Afghanistan, Russia. (We do get some that will go to Spain and set up little Britain but these are a small minority). We like to go to countries people haven't heard of.
    The ISIS issue has had some dampening of this but we are still adventurous.

    With Australians and New Zealanders they are even more prone to travel. Travelling to Europe and beyond is almost a rite of passage for young people. Many come to London to work and visit.

    Continental Europeans seem quite happy to travel too.

    I've noticed the USA guys here seem to be a lot more cautious when it comes to travel. They won't go to places that have worse human rights than the USA, or that are too culturally different. I'm not sure if this is an age related issue or a cultural difference.

    What do you think? Are my observations correct?


    I agree. Fortunately enough even at my age i've done Africa, Australia, North+South America, Asia and now Europe and in my little experiences most travelers are either Brits, Europeans, Aussies or New Zealanders. Outside of the US i've only met about four Americans and only two of them were really travelling (the other was on a business trip and one was just on a short vacation). Anyway, i dunno about the American side so much, maybe their recent political exploits make international travel seem too dangerous. But when i look at all the people like me who were backpacking or doing some kind of work-away/volunteer program then Europeans definitely win in numbers. A few people i asked once told me going out to see the world is really encouraged (mostly at school) and as a result most young people take some time to travel abroad and experience other cultures. Maybe Eu just has more facility (the long history of colonization means they have fewer struggles with visa's) which makes it easier. Plus even little things like Eu having many different cultures and languages make travelling appealing to most curious young people. Just my OP though.
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    Jan 22, 2016 4:41 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidThe USA is a HUGE country. We have beaches, mountains, glaciers, deserts, dunes, plaines, islands, farmland, urban areas, rural areas. If one wants urban sophistication one can go to NYC, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington DC for the cultural events, world-class museums, etc. If one wants old world charm one can go to New Orleans or Charleston. If one wants a bit o' Latin spice they can go to Miami. Want an island vacation? Go to Hawaii or the US Virgin Islands. Want to see glaciers and expansive natural beauty? Go to Alaska. The American Southwest is breathtakingly beautiful as are the Rockies and the Grand Tetons. We have many, many, many National Parks, monuments, battlefields, and historical sites to see. And let's not forget the close proximity of Mexico, Canada and the Caribean.

    I could go on and on but my point is is that there is sooooooo much to do and see in our own country first, it's hard to justify the time and the thousands of dollars to go overseas just to have to beg for more ice in your drink. Is ice really that scarce of a commodity in Europe? Everywhere I went they doled out the ice like it was gold. And God forbid if you had the audacity to ask for more. Mind you not being rude but simply politely asking for it. You'd swear you asked for the country's Crown Jewels. (All that was a bit light-hearted as the lack of ice was a minor inconvenience and everything else about the trip was great. It was just odd to an American that ice would be so precious. Even my foreign-born husband is stingy with the ice cubes here at home and they're free! Lol) I did get a small pebble in a sandwich in France which I can't believe was an accident.

    I'm not knocking international travel. I'd love to get back to Europe. I'd love to see Peru. I'd love to see St. Petersburg and Moscow. I'd love to see Italy. Sorry, no desire to see Iran and Afganistan; although, Turkey isn't out of the question. It's just that there is so much to do and see in our own hemisphere first it's hard to find the time and $$$. We can spend a lifetime just exploring our own backyard.

    I'd also like to have a travel companion or friend from the country or area I'm visiting in order to truly experience the culture. I once spent a week showing a young Mexican college student around New Orleans and plantation country just up river. He really appreciated the personal touch of having a local show him around. This year I'll have the good fortune of having my husband show me around his native Mexico.

    Good post, and points. I saw a LOT of Europe and those parts of Africa bordering the Mediterranean while in the USN, and will be returning there this Summer, and have spent time in MEX, PR, CAN, and Hawaii, too, but I agree: there is just SO MUCH in CONUS! And, it's been my experience that actually talking with people of the kind usually reviled by supposed "liberals" here - you know, those ignorant folks living in "flyover country who cling to their guns and religion"* - reveals some pretty interesting, intelligent, and enjoyable characters whom I've always been glad to meet. My current focus is on the Pacific NW, including BC and AB, but I also have gotten into the habit of spending a good portion of the Fall in the SE, especially VA, the Carolinas, GA, TN, and KY. Same for Summers in the Upper Midwest, where I grew up, but am only now really fully discovering. Closer home, I'm looking forward to more road trips throughout CA and the SW, as well as TX. There IS heaps here at home, and people are missing out on the chance to really learn their country and its people when they pass it up in favor of more exotic or supposed "sophisticated" climes.
    _____
    *Nice commentary on the people you'd serve, Mr. President.
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Jan 22, 2016 6:31 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidThe USA is a HUGE country. We have beaches, mountains, glaciers, deserts, dunes, plaines, islands, farmland, urban areas, rural areas. If one wants urban sophistication one can go to NYC, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington DC for the cultural events, world-class museums, etc. If one wants old world charm one can go to New Orleans or Charleston. If one wants a bit o' Latin spice they can go to Miami. Want an island vacation? Go to Hawaii or the US Virgin Islands. Want to see glaciers and expansive natural beauty? Go to Alaska. The American Southwest is breathtakingly beautiful as are the Rockies and the Grand Tetons. We have many, many, many National Parks, monuments, battlefields, and historical sites to see. And let's not forget the close proximity of Mexico, Canada and the Caribean.

    I could go on and on but my point is is that there is sooooooo much to do and see in our own country first, it's hard to justify the time and the thousands of dollars to go overseas just to have to beg for more ice in your drink. Is ice really that scarce of a commodity in Europe? Everywhere I went they doled out the ice like it was gold. And God forbid if you had the audacity to ask for more. Mind you not being rude but simply politely asking for it. You'd swear you asked for the country's Crown Jewels. (All that was a bit light-hearted as the lack of ice was a minor inconvenience and everything else about the trip was great. It was just odd to an American that ice would be so precious. Even my foreign-born husband is stingy with the ice cubes here at home and they're free! Lol) I did get a small pebble in a sandwich in France which I can't believe was an accident.

    I'm not knocking international travel. I'd love to get back to Europe. I'd love to see Peru. I'd love to see St. Petersburg and Moscow. I'd love to see Italy. Sorry, no desire to see Iran and Afganistan; although, Turkey isn't out of the question. It's just that there is so much to do and see in our own hemisphere first it's hard to find the time and $$$. We can spend a lifetime just exploring our own backyard.

    I'd also like to have a travel companion or friend from the country or area I'm visiting in order to truly experience the culture. I once spent a week showing a young Mexican college student around New Orleans and plantation country just up river. He really appreciated the personal touch of having a local show him around. This year I'll have the good fortune of having my husband show me around his native Mexico.


    What about history and culture, Miami being majority hispanic isn't anything like going to Cuba or Guatemala, I met Americans who said they wouldn't go to Egypt to see the pyramids because you can see one in Las Vegas, I wanted to laugh very hard at their ignorance, that is the kind of view that most people see when they look at Americans, they miss the point completely, yes there is some amazing scenery in North America but there is equally amazing scenery elsewhere in the world and different things, Rome is by far my favourite city on the planet for history, food, architecture etc, its like walking around a living breathing museum that people live in, unless you have been you can never understand what its like, Paris is amazing and London for shopping and nightlife and in Europe you can drink in public and won't get arrested, the list goes on and on, Lisbon is the oldest city in Europe and one of the oldest in the world, the Portuguese are amazing people even the airport security who were very concerned if we had had a great time in their country, you don't get that in the US.
    My house is 600 years old and older than the US.
    Iran is demonised by the west but one of the oldest cultures in the world with some of the oldest buildings in the world and I would go there and do a tour, time and money permitting, there are plenty of places around the world that I have yet been to, but I have seen quite a lot so far, I have a list of places to go which seems to grow faster than I can tick off the places I have been.
    I hope what we have been talking about makes anyone reading this adjust their look on the world and maybe makes people want to travel in a different way, having an open mind is an asset, its also cheaper to do if you know how, I spent a month cycling in France and spent £500 because I slept in my tent and didn't pay for campsites, I slept on beaches and in fields, I paid for 2 nights accommodation in a hostel in Rennes and that was all I paid, had a great time and met lots of great people who were interested in what I was doing and where I was going.
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    Jan 22, 2016 8:38 PM GMT
    Fireworkz said
    UndercoverMan said

    ..,
    But you are having a laugh about history though 500 years? Really? I went to Malta recently and they had sites from Phoenecians, the Ottomans, The Greeks, Rome and pre-history all on one small island. Your closest neighbour Mexico has much better history with the Mayan ruins.

    ..,


    Having a laugh? Not at all. Here in my own state of Louisiana we have a prehistoric World Heritage Site known as Poverty Point. There are other similar sites in the Mississippi Valley. History here goes back farther than 500 years. It's not well documented but archaeologists are piecing it together.

    Poverty Point (French: Pointe de Pauvreté) (16 WC 5) is a prehistoric earthworks of the Poverty Point culture, now a historic monument and World Heritage Site[2] located in the Southern United States. It is 15.5 miles (24.9 km) from the current Mississippi River,[3] and situated on the edge of Maçon Ridge, near the village of Epps in West Carroll Parish in northeastern Louisiana.

    Poverty Point comprises several earthworks and mounds built between 1650 and 700 BCE, during the Archaic period in the Americas by a group of Native Americans of the Poverty Point culture. The culture extended 100 miles (160 km) across the Mississippi Delta. The original purposes of Poverty Point have not been determined by archaeologists, although they have proposed various possibilities including that it was: a settlement, a trading center, and/or a ceremonial religious complex.

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    Jan 22, 2016 9:14 PM GMT
    interestingchap said
    UndercoverMan said


    What about history and culture, Miami being majority hispanic isn't anything like going to Cuba or Guatemala, I met Americans who said they wouldn't go to Egypt to see the pyramids because you can see one in Las Vegas, I wanted to laugh very hard at their ignorance, that is the kind of view that most people see when they look at Americans, they miss the point completely, yes there is some amazing scenery in North America but there is equally amazing scenery elsewhere in the world and different things, Rome is by far my favourite city on the planet for history, food, architecture etc, its like walking around a living breathing museum that people live in, unless you have been you can never understand what its like, Paris is amazing and London for shopping and nightlife and in Europe you can drink in public and won't get arrested, the list goes on and on, Lisbon is the oldest city in Europe and one of the oldest in the world, the Portuguese are amazing people even the airport security who were very concerned if we had had a great time in their country, you don't get that in the US.
    My house is 600 years old and older than the US.
    Iran is demonised by the west but one of the oldest cultures in the world with some of the oldest buildings in the world and I would go there and do a tour, time and money permitting, there are plenty of places around the world that I have yet been to, but I have seen quite a lot so far, I have a list of places to go which seems to grow faster than I can tick off the places I have been.
    I hope what we have been talking about makes anyone reading this adjust their look on the world and maybe makes people want to travel in a different way, having an open mind is an asset, its also cheaper to do if you know how, I spent a month cycling in France and spent £500 because I slept in my tent and didn't pay for campsites, I slept on beaches and in fields, I paid for 2 nights accommodation in a hostel in Rennes and that was all I paid, had a great time and met lots of great people who were interested in what I was doing and where I was going.


    History and culture? As for history I refer you to my previous post. As far as culture I'd venture to say the USA has the most diverse cultures of any in the world. Did you know there are more people of Irish decent than there are Irish in all of Ireland? Every group that came to this country has left its mark on the American culture. The Spanish, the French, the Irish, the Germans, the Scandinavians, the Italians and Sicilians, the Asians, the Africans, the Mexicans, the Central Americans, etc have all contributed in there own unique way to the US culture in the way of cuisine, music, dance, architecture, way of life, etc. The US isn't just what you see in Hollywood movies.

    Your house is 600 years old? Big whoop! I visited a pueblo on a mesa in either Arizona or New Mexico where Native Americans lived in adobe dwellings that were much older than that. Some of the homes still had mica panes windows.

    Oh, and btw, you can drink (alcohol) on the streets of my hometown without fear of arrest. Speaking of my hometown the Native Americans, the French, the Spanish, the African slaves, Irish, Germans, and Italians/Sicilians have contributed to one of the most unique cultures you will find in the USA if not the world. Our cuisine is different, our music is different, our architecture is different, our traditions are different than anywhere else in the US but can be traced to the Old World and the original indigenous people of the area. I could go on but I suspect you get the picture. Visit us sometime.

    P.S. Lisbon is nowhere near the oldest city in Europe much less the world.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2016 10:30 PM GMT
    MGINSD said
    UndercoverMan said
    ...And, it's been my experience that actually talking with people of the kind usually reviled by supposed "liberals" here - you know, those ignorant folks living in "flyover country who cling to their guns and religion"* - reveals some pretty interesting, intelligent, and enjoyable characters whom I've always been glad to meet...


    Makes me think of our Cajun people here in Louisiana - unsophisticated country folk who would give you the shirt off their back even though they might need it themselves. They are the most generous, unpretentious, welcoming people I've ever had the pleasure of knowing. Their culture is unique with a cuisine, architecture and music named for them. Theirs is a living breathing vibrant culture the "sophisticates" would look down their nose at.
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Jan 22, 2016 10:55 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    interestingchap said
    UndercoverMan said


    What about history and culture, Miami being majority hispanic isn't anything like going to Cuba or Guatemala, I met Americans who said they wouldn't go to Egypt to see the pyramids because you can see one in Las Vegas, I wanted to laugh very hard at their ignorance, that is the kind of view that most people see when they look at Americans, they miss the point completely, yes there is some amazing scenery in North America but there is equally amazing scenery elsewhere in the world and different things, Rome is by far my favourite city on the planet for history, food, architecture etc, its like walking around a living breathing museum that people live in, unless you have been you can never understand what its like, Paris is amazing and London for shopping and nightlife and in Europe you can drink in public and won't get arrested, the list goes on and on, Lisbon is the oldest city in Europe and one of the oldest in the world, the Portuguese are amazing people even the airport security who were very concerned if we had had a great time in their country, you don't get that in the US.
    My house is 600 years old and older than the US.
    Iran is demonised by the west but one of the oldest cultures in the world with some of the oldest buildings in the world and I would go there and do a tour, time and money permitting, there are plenty of places around the world that I have yet been to, but I have seen quite a lot so far, I have a list of places to go which seems to grow faster than I can tick off the places I have been.
    I hope what we have been talking about makes anyone reading this adjust their look on the world and maybe makes people want to travel in a different way, having an open mind is an asset, its also cheaper to do if you know how, I spent a month cycling in France and spent £500 because I slept in my tent and didn't pay for campsites, I slept on beaches and in fields, I paid for 2 nights accommodation in a hostel in Rennes and that was all I paid, had a great time and met lots of great people who were interested in what I was doing and where I was going.


    History and culture? As for history I refer you to my previous post. As far as culture I'd venture to say the USA has the most diverse cultures of any in the world. Did you know there are more people of Irish decent than there are Irish in all of Ireland? Every group that came to this country has left its mark on the American culture. The Spanish, the French, the Irish, the Germans, the Scandinavians, the Italians and Sicilians, the Asians, the Africans, the Mexicans, the Central Americans, etc have all contributed in there own unique way to the US culture in the way of cuisine, music, dance, architecture, way of life, etc. The US isn't just what you see in Hollywood movies.

    Your house is 600 years old? Big whoop! I visited a pueblo on a Mesa in either Arizona or New Mexico where a Native Americans lived in adobe dwellings that were much older than that. Some of the homes still had mica panes windows.

    Oh, and btw, you can drink (alcohol) on the streets of my hometown without fear of arrest. Speaking of my hometown the Native Americans, the French, the Spanish, the African slaves, Irish, Germans, and Italians/Sicilians have contributed to one of the most unique cultures you will find in the USA if not the world. Our cuisine is different, our music is different, our architecture is different, our traditions are different than anywhere else in the US but can be traced to the Old World and the original indigenous people of the area. I could go on but I suspect you get the picture. Visit us sometime.


    I have been to the US a few times but the various cultures that have ended up there have been considerably diluted, also there are many customs that we have in the UK and Europe that you do not have in the US but I am open to seeing what the US has to offer but as you are aware it is a very large country and I have only been in a handful of states, as for the cajun people, I would consider it a pleasure to meet them even though I am a sophisticate as well.
    I don't have my views of the country based on hollywood but through experience mainly, you cannot have an opinion on somewhere that you haven't been, there are plenty of places that I haven't been.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2016 11:38 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    MGINSD said
    UndercoverMan said
    ...And, it's been my experience that actually talking with people of the kind usually reviled by supposed "liberals" here - you know, those ignorant folks living in "flyover country who cling to their guns and religion"* - reveals some pretty interesting, intelligent, and enjoyable characters whom I've always been glad to meet...


    Makes me think of our Cajun people here in Louisiana - unsophisticated country folk who would give you the shirt off their back even though they might need it themselves. They are the most generous, unpretentious, welcoming people I've ever had the pleasure of knowing. Their culture is unique with a cuisine, architecture and music named for them. Theirs is a living breathing vibrant culture the "sophisticates" would look down their nose at.

    Good call! That's been my experience both times I visited The Pelican State. Some of the friendliest people - and great cooks! - in the US. Take a look at the film Louisiana Story if you want to know what I mean.
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    Jan 23, 2016 5:14 AM GMT
    interestingchap said
    UndercoverMan said
    interestingchap said
    UndercoverMan said


    I have been to the US a few times but the various cultures that have ended up there have been considerably diluted...


    That's a matter of perspective. You say diluted. I say transformed. Cross pollinated. Enriched. As I mentioned before, the culture of New Orleans is the result of the coming together of different European cultures, African cultures, and Native American cultures melded and transformed into a totally unique culture. This is not unique to only Louisians and the US; this is happens worldwide whenever different cultures come into contact with each other.
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    Jan 23, 2016 8:28 AM GMT
    When people visit a country it is because they want to visit the place not because they don't have a lot of good places to see in their own country. I find the argument about 'a lot of great things to do in one's country'not very appealing since there are tremendous activities to do in one's own domestic tourism everywhere and yet people travel abroad too.

    I think for once, countries like USA struggle with their own privilege. I don't say this with any mean seated judgement. I think privilege has a way of blinding perspectives. Because of USA's economic and cultural outreach, I was exposed to Hollywood films, I was exposed to American retailers and fast food chains, I read books by Toni Morrison, Kurt Vonnegut, Alice Walker Ernest Hemingway and many others. I grew up watching American sitcoms like Small Wonder and cartoons on Nickelodeon. I listened to American bands. My newspapers and magazines cover a lot of American issues and politics because they are owned by American media groups so I knew what causes worries, what people desire. In short, I was exposed to a whole new culture from a very young age. India being a former British colony meant that English has a socio-economic power and so learning a new language also add tremendously in furthering one's own understanding that there is a world beyond.

    If someone is to come today and tell me that Americans are psychopaths who will kill your children citing all the mass shooting in schools that comes in newspaper, I would probably laugh it off because I know it is not true. I have been exposed and engaged with many different American stories of struggle, the literary and cinematic endeavours on family and childhood, the debates on gun laws to fit all Americans into one sweeping generalisation. But also as a kid, I romanticised the landscapes of not only USA but also foreign lands far away from mine. I want to go to USA one day to experience all of it on my own. Of course given the massive size of the world's largest GDP, it won't possible to cover the entire nation in one trip.

    A lot of Americans don't get the opportunity to know a world beyond USA because there hasn't been a need out of their own privilege. It can confine people to their own world that is within a world. I think most American only watch Hollywood films and American TV, read American books and are monolingual like much of the predominantly English speaking world. Lack of exposure creates lack of imagination which creates a lack of desire to see the world.

    The second reason why many Americans do not travel abroad is security threat. There are places where American are legitimately more at risk of being a victim to a crime but those are more out of political reason. The growing resistance/anger against the imperialistic economics and militaristic practices of USA in many parts of the world has many innocent Americans paying the price for it.

  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Jan 23, 2016 11:53 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    interestingchap said
    UndercoverMan said


    Oh, and btw, you can drink (alcohol) on the streets of my hometown without fear of arrest. Speaking of my hometown the Native Americans, the French, the Spanish, the African slaves, Irish, Germans, and Italians/Sicilians have contributed to one of the most unique cultures you will find in the USA if not the world. Our cuisine is different, our music is different, our architecture is different, our traditions are different than anywhere else in the US but can be traced to the Old World and the original indigenous people of the area. I could go on but I suspect you get the picture. Visit us sometime.



    I've been to New Orleans. I loved it. I would go back. A great city but not really that unique. There are far more unique cultures in the world.
    There are many parts of the world with pre-historic cultures. It is not about comparing. Seeing one part doesn't preclude seeing somewhere else.

    Great there is a pueblo in Arizona i'll log that for my next trip I still want to see the pyramids in Egypt and the ancient temples in Asia.

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    Jan 23, 2016 7:54 PM GMT
    Part of it could be our lack of flexibility and being spoiled due to the accommodations: the hotels. Here in North America a budget hotel, e.g., Motel 6, Days Inn, etc. will have at minimum a queen size bed and an en suite bathroom with a decent size shower with lots of hot water. It'll probably also have a tv, and it may have a little coffee maker with packets of pre-measured coffee. In the old days before cell phones there was also a phone in the room. Elsewhere in the world that would be a very ritzy hotel.