Is Your Athletic Wearable Technology Still on Your Wrist?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 21, 2016 4:52 AM GMT
    NYT: Smartwatches, fitness trackers and other devices are supposed to better our lives, but the gadgets often sit idle and collect dust.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/21/style/where-wearable-technology-ends-up-hint-not-your-wrist.html?
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jan 21, 2016 4:06 PM GMT
    Well said, I've had 2 e-mails regarding "Fitbits" from listeners to my weekly fitness show.... one who was considering buying her overweight sister a Fitbit as a way to "help her" improve her health and wellness.

    My response was that the sister needed to want to improve her own health, that the writer needed to get her sister a gift that the sister really wants, not one that the writer feels her sister can benefit from... otherwise, it won't be used and a waste of money.

    I have the Charge HR Fitbit and really enjoy it, but I'm into it.
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    Jan 21, 2016 8:05 PM GMT
    The article includes the Apple Watch. We each got one in October, and still wear them everyday. Except when we wear an evening watch to some dressy function. We love the connection to our calendar, text, email and incoming calls. Plus we've always got the outside temperature displayed, and the hourly forecast at a screen touch.

    Despite what the article says, ours run about 2 days on a charge. But if you take your watch off at night you've gotta put it down anyway. So affixing the magnetic, inductive charging disk on the back of the case is no big effort. And if it does run down it keeps all the stored data until charged. For one thing, most of it's in the iPhone, anyway. The Watch is really just a paired extension of the phone.

    So we like ours, and wear them all the time as our daily wear watches.
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    Jan 21, 2016 10:01 PM GMT
    No. I wore my Apple Watch for approximately one month before using it as a dust magnet. It was probably a stupid decision on my part in the first place, knowing I hate jewelry or anything touching my body other than material.
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    Jan 22, 2016 2:12 AM GMT
    Radd saidNo. I wore my Apple Watch for approximately one month before using it as a dust magnet. It was probably a stupid decision on my part in the first place, knowing I hate jewelry or anything touching my body other than material.

    I wear no jewelry, either. I hate rings, necklaces and bracelets. But a wristwatch is practical, gives me the time, and with a smartwatch, lots of other useful info.

    I know some argue that a smartphone serves the time purpose. But constantly pulling it out of your pants pocket is even more clumsy than having a pocket watch in your vest, as was the style over 100 years ago.

    Seems to me using your smartphone to tell time is a step backwards in technology. The big breakthrough with the wrist watch was its convenience, what made it an essential for the next century. Especially as personal time management became obligatory for modern living.
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    Jan 22, 2016 4:32 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Radd saidNo. I wore my Apple Watch for approximately one month before using it as a dust magnet. It was probably a stupid decision on my part in the first place, knowing I hate jewelry or anything touching my body other than material.

    I wear no jewelry, either. I hate rings, necklaces and bracelets. But a wristwatch is practical, gives me the time, and with a smartwatch, lots of other useful info.

    I know some argue that a smartphone serves the time purpose. But constantly pulling it out of your pants pocket is even more clumsy than having a pocket watch in your vest, as was the style over 100 years ago.

    Seems to me using your smartphone to tell time is a step backwards in technology. The big breakthrough with the wrist watch was its convenience, what made it an essential for the next century. Especially as personal time management became obligatory for modern living.



    Yeah but suddenly I had TWO devices to charge and they don't use the same cord. Not to mention the display is microscopic.
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    Jan 22, 2016 10:00 AM GMT
    My partner got me one of the small Fitbits last year. I used it daily for almost a year. But, when a began spending more on busted replacement straps than the actual Fitbit it was placed in the drawer of misfit gadgets. The fact that it fell off daily and I found it every time was a miracle! I know that I walk a lot daily. No need for a piece of electronics to tell me what I already knew. =)
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jan 22, 2016 3:49 PM GMT
    I have the Jawbone Up. It's a little tracker you can clip on or wear on a strap on your wrist. I got it for $25 on Amazon (normally $50). All it does is track motion and send the data to your phone via Bluetooth. That's all I need. It has a little disc battery that is supposed to last 6 months, we'll see. I hate wearing a watch and I play volleyball. I didn't want a clunky tracker strapped to my wrist. It's pretty sturdy, its already been accidentally put through the washer and dryer with no ill effects.
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    Jan 23, 2016 2:26 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidNYT: Smartwatches, fitness trackers and other devices are supposed to better our lives, but the gadgets often sit idle and collect dust.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/21/style/where-wearable-technology-ends-up-hint-not-your-wrist.html?


    Flaky tech that doesn't work well. Save the money.