You May Not Survive Cardiac Arrest Living on High Floors

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    Jan 22, 2016 5:57 AM GMT
    NYT: The higher the floor you live on, the lower your chance of surviving a cardiac arrest, according to a new study.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/01/21/high-rise-living-linked-to-lower-survival-after-cardiac-arrest/?ref=health
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    Jan 22, 2016 9:18 PM GMT
    woodsmen said
    NYT: The higher the floor you live on, the lower your chance of surviving a cardiac arrest, according to a new study.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/01/21/high-rise-living-linked-to-lower-survival-after-cardiac-arrest/?ref=health

    This would tract with studies that already prove a rapid response to cardiac arrest is vital. Anything that delays that response decreases survival chances. Including obstacles in gaining building entrance by first responders, and even the speed of elevators to higher floors.

    It's because a cardiac arrest studied here is not the same as many other forms of "heart attack". It's sudden, the classic image of the person who suddenly clutches their chest and falls to the ground helpless.

    There are also types of "slow" heart attack (I won't attempt all the medical terminology), where some victims even drive themselves to the ER. Our best friend had one of those, while he was out horseback riding almost 2 years ago, And after arriving conscious at the ER in his own car and was stabilized, he was given a quadruple heart bypass. He's alive today.

    So this is good information to keep in mind, if one is at a higher risk for heart disease. Whether yourself or someone close to you.
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    Jan 22, 2016 9:39 PM GMT
    If you regularly take the stairs instead of the elevator, you may not suffer a cardiac arrest in the first place.

    Climbing stairs can prolong life
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7591311.stm
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    Jan 22, 2016 10:17 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidIf you regularly take the stairs instead of the elevator, you may not suffer a cardiac arrest in the first place.

    Climbing stairs can prolong life
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7591311.stm

    True, and I take the stairs when I'm able, rather than the elevator. But what do you do when you live on the 20th floor? That could GIVE you a heart attack.
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    Jan 22, 2016 11:12 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    True, and I take the stairs when I'm able, rather than the elevator. But what do you do when you live on the 20th floor? That could GIVE you a heart attack.


    That's probably the way I'll end up going when my time comes. If I see a long flight of steps, I can't resist running up it.

    I ran up these steps in just over 20 sec recently.

    60547_1342089654442_PF.jpg

    And ran up this flight of stairs on the London Underground in about the same time.

    22london13.jpg

    If I lived in a high rise apartment, I'd probably settle for alternating between stairs and elevator every 10 floors.
  • FRE0

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    Jan 23, 2016 1:03 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Ex_Mil8 saidIf you regularly take the stairs instead of the elevator, you may not suffer a cardiac arrest in the first place.

    Climbing stairs can prolong life
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7591311.stm

    True, and I take the stairs when I'm able, rather than the elevator. But what do you do when you live on the 20th floor? That could GIVE you a heart attack.


    When my house was in the design phase, I had two stacked closets included which could be converted to an elevator shaft in case I had trouble with stairs after reaching the age of 95.
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    Jan 23, 2016 2:24 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidNYT: The higher the floor you live on, the lower your chance of surviving a cardiac arrest, according to a new study.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/01/21/high-rise-living-linked-to-lower-survival-after-cardiac-arrest/?ref=health


    Slow news day at NYT.

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    Jan 26, 2016 4:54 AM GMT
    Genetics are the primary component in heart disease. If you experience unstable angina, the most important thing to do is to CHEW aspirin IMMEDIATELY. Then, call for help.

    The immediate administration of a blood thinner can make ALL the difference.

    Know the signs.

    http://www.heart.org.