So is there some kind of guide for beginner sets and reps

  • NeweraLB

    Posts: 42

    Jan 24, 2016 6:02 PM GMT
    6'2 156 trying to gain 15-20 pounds of muscle. Maybe a diet plan too cause everyone has a different metabolism and even though I'm thin, I feel like mine is slow.
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    Jan 24, 2016 8:10 PM GMT
    There are all kinds of such guides. As an example, look up to the top of this page, where it says "workout plans." Although this has not been updated in a very long time, the "strength foundation" plan was supposed to be for beginners. And once you click through to the workout menu, there are nutrition links on the left of the page.

    It was a good idea, left over from when this site was all about manufacturing more hot gay guys.
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    Jan 25, 2016 1:41 AM GMT
    Kid, start out by doing basic movements. Bench, deadlift and squat. Bicep curls and dips for chest/ tricep. Stick with the basics until you get some strength.

    And ask a bigger guy in the gym for advice. They might look intimidating but almost every guy I have ever met in a gym, 35 years now, would be flattered and happy to help you. Guys love that you acknowledge them and I bet anyone would be happy to help you.

    Best of luck!
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jan 25, 2016 4:49 AM GMT
    The standard is 3 sets of 8 reps, working out 3 or 4 days per week.
    Diet ?
    It's best to stay away from cake, cookies, etc., as much as possible. Same for the entire potato chip and soda aisles at the supermarket. Stay away from all vending machines and fast food establishments (like McDonalds).
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    Jan 26, 2016 8:45 PM GMT
    The way I learned it, it's 3 sets and 8 to 11 reps per set. In theory, if you can't do 8, you need to ratchet down on the weight. Conversely, if you can do more than 11, you need to ratchet up on the weight.

    I do the lightest set first. It gets the muscles firing in the proper split-second sequence to accomplish the particular movement. Basically, you are reestablishing a mind-body connection that you haven't used since the last time you did the exercise. Just in case the initial firing sequence is slightly off, the fact that you are on the lightest set can help avoid injury.

    I do the heaviest set next and then ratchet back a bit for a final set to move the muscles further toward exhaustion--that's the set that actually builds muscle bulk. In theory, you couldn't complete that all-important last set at the heaviest weight because the muscles are already too close to exhaustion, but you can still complete it by ratcheting back a bit on the weight.
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    Jan 29, 2016 12:16 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidThere are all kinds of such guides. As an example, look up to the top of this page, where it says "workout plans." Although this has not been updated in a very long time, the "strength foundation" plan was supposed to be for beginners. And once you click through to the workout menu, there are nutrition links on the left of the page.

    It was a good idea, left over from when this site was all about manufacturing more hot gay guys.


    Since that aspect of RJ has stagnated, do you think it may be better for beginners to go on a 5x5 or another program? The workout plans here were designed by professionals, and I read in posts-past they are effective, but no one is still doing them.

    There's a lack of ongoing support, and beginners have questions that tend to come up in the middle of a program. RJ is no longer in the business of "manufacturing more hot gay guys", so I doubt the forum will be responsive enough to provide feedback. On the other hand, plenty of beginners are still doing Starting Strength, or a variation of a 5x5 or Wendler's 5/3/1. Any one of those will give a beginner a great strength foundation and increased proficiency in basic movement patterns. The added bonus is up-to-date resources and feedback from others currently working the programs.