Bike or climber for supplemental cardio at home?

  • HPgeek934

    Posts: 970

    Jan 28, 2016 2:48 AM GMT
    Hey RealJockers, I'm trying to find a small piece of equiptment that I could use at home doing the cold weather to get some cardio/fat loss in with my workouts. I am looking at these two for the price and the foldability, but not such which would be better. The climber Im afraid might be more of a gimmick, but before I decide I figured I'd ask for opinions. These are what I'm looking at...

    Bike:
    http://www.amazon.com/Marcy-NS652-Foldable-Excercise-Bike/dp/B0090OKG38/ref=sr_1_10?s=exercise-and-fitness&ie=UTF8&qid=1453948873&sr=1-10&keywords=stationary+bike

    Climber:
    http://www.amazon.com/Conquer-Vertical-Climber-Fitness-Climbing/dp/B00T6RTHFC/ref=sr_1_3?s=exercise-and-fitness&ie=UTF8&qid=1453948778&sr=1-3&keywords=maxi+climber

    Thoughts? Thanks all!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 28, 2016 5:04 AM GMT
    Well, having had both, I'd ordinarily say "climber," but that looks like a flimsy POS that wouldn't last a day. The one I had cost about ten times that (in the 1990s) and was far more sophisticated. But the bearings wore out regularly, and eventually I couldn't get parts for it. I liked it because it took up relatively little floor space, and you could just jump onto it.

    Only one, overpriced brand (Versaclimber) appears to be available these days, possibly due to patent suits?

    Riding a road bike on rollers in front of the TV is a good workout, but it ends up taking half an hour to set it up and then put it away. Might as well just go outside and ride.

    That "bike" also looks like a flimsy POS that won't last a week. Better to spend that money buying a cheap bike on Craigslist and go put some miles on it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 28, 2016 5:47 AM GMT
    I bought this for a road bike I already had. It's in a spare bedroom so I don't need to dismantle it, which only involves taking the rear wheel of the bycle out of the trainer. I bought it in March 2011 and it's still going strong. What wears out are the tires on the bicycle. The clamping mechanism that clamps the bicycle's rear axle can chew up the quick release lever so I have a piece of cloth over each end.

    I have it dialed up for maximum resistance and my bicycle is set to its most difficult gear. I have some neodymium super magnets that I'm wondering if I could put on it to increase the resistance, but I haven't tried it.

    I listen to music with a fast beat and pedal to that, each leg is going around about 72 times a minute. My heart rate gets up in to the mid 130s to 150s. Takes a bit longer for it to get up there compared to running.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000AAYC72
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 28, 2016 6:20 AM GMT
    You also need a good fan for trainers or rollers. And put down some towels. All the sweat that just evaporates out on the road will be rolling off you.

    I used to ride them while watching "Star Trek" reruns. Spin during the action, sprint during the commercials.

    I used to use the climber for "circuit training." Climb for a minute between sets to keep the heart rate up.
  • HPgeek934

    Posts: 970

    Jan 28, 2016 12:42 PM GMT
    Unfortunately because I live in an apartment, space is an issue so I would need/want something that takes up little space and can be stored away.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 28, 2016 7:26 PM GMT
    Assuming that you already have a bicycle (and if not, get one) a set of rollers, or a rear-wheel trainer, such as the link above, will fold flat and slide under your bed, or the back of a closet.

    I used to keep two bicycles in a small apartment, using a freestanding wall rack, just inside the entry. (No drilling holes in the walls). I built it myself, for about $10, but there lots of similar ones that you can buy for $100.
  • HPgeek934

    Posts: 970

    Jan 28, 2016 7:38 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidAssuming that you already have a bicycle (and if not, get one) a set of rollers, or a rear-wheel trainer, such as the link above, will fold flat and slide under your bed, or the back of a closet.

    I used to keep two bicycles in a small apartment, using a freestanding wall rack, just inside the entry. (No drilling holes in the walls). I built it myself, for about $10, but there lots of similar ones that you can buy for $100.


    I do have a bike, but I don't want to store it in my living room or bedroom, in plain sight. That's not my style. Besides, that's not what I'm asking in this thread. Thank you for your input.
  • dumbbell

    Posts: 32

    Jan 29, 2016 3:53 PM GMT
    Have to suggest a third option -- Have you considered skipping these machines and using freeweights to do Escalating Density Training? It's not for everyone, but you might like it. I think it's a better choice for conditioning than any machine, and it's perfect for apartment-dwellers for whom space is an issue. I do it with PowerBlocks, which take up two square feet.

    If I had to choose between your two options, for the price, I'd try the climber.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 29, 2016 8:45 PM GMT
    Once I had a roller device so I could use my bicycle for stationary exercise. It used a magnetic flux brake which worked well. The problem was that I had knobby tires on the (mountain) bike which made it very noisy. With smooth tires probably it would have been acceptably quiet. A fan is essential for keeping cool.

    Some guys mistakenly think that overdressing to maximize sweating will make a workout more effective. Actually, the opposite is true; the objective is not sweating but rather expending energy. Overdressing causes fatigue to occur much more quickly thereby reducing the amount of exercise it is possible to get.

    Riding outside is nicer, but it isn't always possible.