Love Your Enemies (AND take care of the Poor) Because Julius Caesar Did and Jesus Christ Reiterated This

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    Jan 30, 2016 8:44 PM GMT
    He certainly showed admirable self-restraint and mercy, both in his conduct of the civil war and in the hour of victory. While Pompeius announced that he would treat as enemies those who did not take up arms for the government, Caesar gave out that those who were neutral and of neither party should be numbered with his friends. He freely allowed all those whom he had made centurions on Pompeius’ recommendation to go over to his rival. When conditions of surrender were under discussion at Ilerda, and friendly intercourse between the two parties was constant, Afranius and Petreius, with a sudden change of purpose, put to death all of Caesar’s soldiers whom they found in their camp; but Caesar could not bring himself to retaliate in kind. At the Battle of Pharsalus [Note 1] he cried out, Spare your fellow citizens, and afterwards allowed each of his men to save any one man he pleased of the opposite party. And it will be found that no Pompeian lost his life except in battle, save only Afranius and Faustus, and the young Lucius Caesar; and it is believed that not even these men were slain by his wish, even though the two former had taken up arms again after being pardoned, while Caesar had not only cruelly put to death the dictator‘s slaves and freedmen with fire and sword, but had even butchered the wild beasts which he had procured for the entertainment of the people. At last, in his later years, he went so far as to allow all those whom he had not yet pardoned to return to Italy, and to hold magistracies and the command of armies: and he actually set up the statue of Lucius Sulla and the statue of Pompey, which had been broken to pieces by the populace. After this, if any dangerous plots were formed against him, or slanders uttered, he preferred to quash rather than to punish them. Accordingly, he took no further notice of the conspiracies which were detected, and of meetings by night, than to make known by proclamation that he was aware of them; and he thought it enough to give public warning to those who spoke ill of him, not to persist in their conduct, bearing with good nature the attacks on his reputation made by the scurrilous volume of Aulus Caecina and the abusive lampoons of Pitholaus.

    http://www.romansonline.com/Src_Frame.asp?DocID=Stn_JLCS_75
    Recorded by Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars, Julius Caesar, Chapter 75: Mercy to Enemies

    Love for Enemies

    27 “But to you who are listening I say: Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, 28 bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you. 29 If someone slaps you on one cheek, turn to them the other also. If someone takes your coat, do not withhold your shirt from them. 30 Give to everyone who asks you, and if anyone takes what belongs to you, do not demand it back. 31 Do to others as you would have them do to you.

    32 “If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners love those who love them. 33 And if you do good to those who are good to you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners do that. 34 And if you lend to those from whom you expect repayment, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, expecting to be repaid in full. 35 But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be children of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked. 36 Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful.

    Luke 6: 27-36
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    Feb 20, 2016 9:07 PM GMT
    Steefen

    Bisexual and gay teenagers should not commit suicide over Christianity because Christianity is more than 50% Roman Emperor Worship.

    Second, Christianity is designed for believers to fail spiritually. Here is the pernicious programming:

    Jesus is the son of the God of the Jews.
    Jesus believes in the god of the Jews.
    Moses was blessed to be in the presence of God.
    King David said, Lord, I will seek your face.
    The god of the Jews says at Leviticus 17:10, drink blood and I will turn my face away from you.
    Jesus: drink blood in remembrance of me.
    Jesus also told people through parable that the Jewish God was taking away the Promised Land and giving it to the Romans because the Jewish authorities, the wicked tenants gave the Jewish God's Son to the Romans first for capital punishment.
    This is part of the reason why Josephus and the Babylonian Talmud (see Jesus in the Talmud by Peter Schafer) consider declarations about Jesus calamitous.

    Therefore, Christianity is not worth your suicide. Either Jesus was better and did not lead people against the Torah and did not tell people the Jewish God was choosing another people or 1) Jesus was right to do this because the notion of the Jewish God was lost when there was no Exodus from the Romans but destruction of Temple Judaism and its notion of God or 2) the Roman overseers of new religions in the empire bugged Christianity to love and worship the Jewish God in quite dysfunctional ways.

    Response from a Person Who Believes It Is Right for Bisexual and Gay Teenagers to Commit Suicide over LDS Anti-Bisexual and Anti-Gay Policies (example: a married gay couple cannot baptize their child into LDS)

    I question your knowledge of the Lord. You focus more on Roman rulers than you do the words of Yeshua.

    Steefen

    Response is actually above. Original comment was only the ways Julius Caesar could be used in the creation of Christianity.
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    Feb 22, 2016 2:49 AM GMT
    Another Homophobic Christian

    Quit making excuses for living a sinful lifestyle. Repent and ask Jesus to come into your life as Lord and saviour and you can be saved too. God loves you.

    Stephenoabc/Steefen, author of the Greatest Bible Study in Historical Accuracy

    This isn't about me.
    It is about the worth of Christianity.

    Do you like taking Communion when you know from Leviticus 17:10 that the God of Moses turns His face from you and separates you from his people? It is about Christianity paying worship royalties to Julius Caesar, Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian. How saved are you when enemies of the Jews put a virus in your religion such that your search for God's face only turns God's face away from you? The Jewish Revolt was defeated by Rome and Roman propaganda called for the gospels to be written. That's why the seat of Christianity was Rome, and to some extent is still Rome. The Roman propaganda virus infected Jesus in the gospels having Jesus himself declare cannibalism and drinking of His blood to turn his Father's face away from you. You are in NO position to judge.
  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Feb 22, 2016 11:30 AM GMT

    I am confused.

    Knowing all this, knowing how religion is easily perverted and changed within a few years much less within a few hundred or thousand, you are still very religious in nature?

    Imagining all you know to be true why would it be any less suspect? Why would other aspects of Jesus' teaching not also be affected or mishaped by other events and situations? Why would his understanding of Judaism not of also come from a place where it was manipulated and altered to suit the needs of a previous time?

    Why would the Judaism that Jesus based his ideas and teachings off of not have been another trick of history? And why not the religions that Judaism was based off of? Such as Zoroastrianism? And did Zoroastrianism not come from somewhere?

    Why does it all begin with Jesus for you? And not Zoroaster? What sense would it make to think that the teachings of Zoroaster didn't suffer the same fate that the teachings of Jesus did?


    Why choose any spot in this chain to begin and act as if it is more important or more valid than any other spot?
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    Feb 22, 2016 2:28 PM GMT
    It was typical of ancient Romans to be generous with fellow citizens in defeat, but ruthless when dealing with non-Romans. Just 2 other examples from Julius Caesar's life:

    When a young man Caesar was captured and held hostage by Mediterranean pirates, who were disrupting Roman commercial shipping. Caesar himself indicates he was treated well, the pirates just wanting the ransom money, which was paid and Caesar released unharmed.

    Caesar then returned from Rome with an armed force, defeated those same pirates, and crucified them. Which helped establish Caesar as a successful, tough & ruthless protector of the Roman people and their interests.

    Years later during the Gallic wars the tribes opposing Caesar became united under Vercingetorix. Caesar eventually won and Vercingetorix voluntarily presented himself for surrender, reportedly in a noble manner and respectful to his conqueror, to stop the fighting and spare his people further death & suffering.

    Caesar returned to Rome with Vercingetorix as his captive, and had him imprisoned for 5 years. Until Caesar was granted formal Triumph honors & celebrations by the Senate, at which time Vercingetorix was executed to mark the occasion. Legend has it that he was ritually strangled, it being unclear whether it was performed in public as part of the celebration, or out of view in the prison.

    Caesar could indeed be merciful to some enemies, evidently when it was judged to be the most politically advantageous tactic. But other enemies were deemed expendable, especially when there were also political gains to be realized. In this regard I don't think Caesar was particularly merciful nor a model that Christ "reiterated" as you word it.
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    Feb 23, 2016 2:56 AM GMT
    badbug

    You are still very religious in nature?

    stephenoabc

    That is not true. I make an effort to avoid what I've learned to avoid. Above, I mentioned the virus that was put in Christianity to make it dysfunction, spiritually. That virus being Communion which causes God to turn Its Face from believers. I'm not big on Communion. Second, there are some lyrics in favorite hymns I will go silent on when there is congregational singing.

    There's also the social functionalism of religion.
    There's certainly the psychological functionalism of religion.

    I could go on.

    badbug
    Imagining all you know to be true why would it be any less suspect?

    stephenoabc

    Why would it not be more suspect? It is more suspect.

    badbug
    Why would other aspects of Jesus' teaching not also be affected or misshaped by other events and situations?

    stephenoabc

    The emperors only that factor into the creation of the Jesus character had great resources whose wisdom have withstood the test of time. One emperor, Octavius had a poet, Virgil who wrote the Aeneid borrowing from the great Homer.

    Some of what Jesus taught is classic, withstanding the test of time; and, therefore, is valuable.

    badbug

    Why would his understanding of Judaism not have also come from a place where it was manipulated and altered to suit the needs of a previous time?

    stephenoabc

    It certainly was.

    badbug

    Why does it all begin with Jesus for you?

    stephenoabc

    It does not all begin with Jesus for me.

    It sort of begins with Gilgamesh / Sumer.

    In my book, The Greatest Bible Study in Historical Accuracy by Steefen (my pen name), I start with the Hyksos, make my way to the 18th Dynasty then to the time of King David.

    These parts of my book, first edition, did not need rewriting. What I wrote about Jesus in 2010-2011 has changed. I didn't know it would be 2016 and I have not yet got my second edition out so I could try making the rounds with publishers and trying to do some PR.

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    Feb 23, 2016 3:16 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidIt was typical of ancient Romans to be generous with fellow citizens in defeat, but ruthless when dealing with non-Romans. Just 2 other examples from Julius Caesar's life:

    When a young man Caesar was captured and held hostage by Mediterranean pirates, who were disrupting Roman commercial shipping. Caesar himself indicates he was treated well, the pirates just wanting the ransom money, which was paid and Caesar released unharmed.

    Caesar then returned from Rome with an armed force, defeated those same pirates, and crucified them. Which helped establish Caesar as a successful, tough & ruthless protector of the Roman people and their interests.

    Years later during the Gallic wars the tribes opposing Caesar became united under Vercingetorix. Caesar eventually won and Vercingetorix voluntarily presented himself for surrender, reportedly in a noble manner and respectful to his conqueror, to stop the fighting and spare his people further death & suffering.

    Caesar returned to Rome with Vercingetorix as his captive, and had him imprisoned for 5 years. Until Caesar was granted formal Triumph honors & celebrations by the Senate, at which time Vercingetorix was executed to mark the occasion. Legend has it that he was ritually strangled, it being unclear whether it was performed in public as part of the celebration, or out of view in the prison.

    Caesar could indeed be merciful to some enemies, evidently when it was judged to be the most politically advantageous tactic. But other enemies were deemed expendable, especially when there were also political gains to be realized. In this regard I don't think Caesar was particularly merciful

    Stephenoabc
    but in regards to what history tells us about Julius Caesar as I quoted above, he was--and was known for Clementia

    ArtDeco
    nor a model that Christ "reiterated" as you word it.


    Stephenoabc
    You do not think Caesar was particularly merciful nor a model that Christ "reiterated," as I word it.

    Here's your Jesus Christ, [in another regard] on loving enemies:

    But those enemies of mine who did not want me to be king over them–bring them here and kill them in front of me.’
    Luke 19:27

    There is another passage: how did Jesus behave towards his enemies, the Pharisees? He called his enemies vipers and hypocrites. He turned over tables in the Temple.


    Given the biography of Julius Caesar and the lack of an equivalent level biography of Jesus, the evidence is strong that Julius Caesar had more instances of forgiveness and loving enemies than Jesus did. The evidence has more weight on Julius Caesar than on Jesus, making Jesus a secondary source to Julius Caesar’s example-setting primacy. Julius Caesar became god-man of an empire, Jesus became god-man under that empire.


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    Feb 23, 2016 4:12 AM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    Julius Caesar became god-man of an empire, Jesus became god-man under that empire.

    Julius Caesar was only declared divine after his death. That custom continued until the mentally deranged Caligula (the nickname by which we know him) became Emperor in AD 37.

    After his assassination the next Emperor, Claudius, declined to be a living god. It's unclear whether his successor Nero really thought he was devine. As late as AD 79, when Emperor Vespasian feared he was terminally ill, he said: "Woe is me. I think I am becoming a god."

    In order words, soon to be dead and deified. But not while he lived. To be alive was to remain a human. Death meant he would likely be made a god. Vespasian evidently preferred to remain a living human.
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    Feb 24, 2016 2:27 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC said
    Julius Caesar became god-man of an empire, Jesus became god-man under that empire.


    Julius Caesar was only declared divine after his death. That custom continued until the mentally deranged Caligula (the nickname by which we know him) became Emperor in AD 37.

    After his assassination the next Emperor, Claudius, declined to be a living god. It's unclear whether his successor Nero really thought he was devine. As late as AD 79, when Emperor Vespasian feared he was terminally ill, he said: "Woe is me. I think I am becoming a god."

    In order words, soon to be dead and deified. But not while he lived. To be alive was to remain a human. Death meant he would likely be made a god. Vespasian evidently preferred to remain a living human.


    Art Deco, you are in error.

    "The inclusion of Caius Julius Caesar's statue in the procession of those of the gods at the opening ceremonies of the games, and the placing of more statues in and around the temples on the Capitol suggested a status that was somewhat more than human."

    "When news had reached Rome of the victory at Thapsus, a statue of Caesar had been set up showing him standing on a globe with an inscrption on the pedestal reading 'To the Unconquered God,' but Caesar odered this erased after his return."

    "After Pharsalus, Caesar had already been formally referred to as a god in the honors and decrees of Hellenistic communities in the provinces."

    Second, Domitian deified himself while alive. He was a living god. This was necessary because he was so at odds with the Senate. A god does not wait to be recognized as such by humans, especially, senators. Either you are a god-man or you are not.

    Jesus was a living god? Is that your point? What Senate or Sanhedrin declared him a living god? Jesus was a living god and Julius Caesar was not? Is that your point?

    Moses did miracles. Jesus did miracles. Doing miracles does not make one more than a prophet who can do miracles.
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    Feb 24, 2016 2:28 AM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC said
    Julius Caesar became god-man of an empire, Jesus became god-man under that empire.


    Julius Caesar was only declared divine after his death. That custom continued until the mentally deranged Caligula (the nickname by which we know him) became Emperor in AD 37.

    After his assassination the next Emperor, Claudius, declined to be a living god. It's unclear whether his successor Nero really thought he was devine. As late as AD 79, when Emperor Vespasian feared he was terminally ill, he said: "Woe is me. I think I am becoming a god."

    In order words, soon to be dead and deified. But not while he lived. To be alive was to remain a human. Death meant he would likely be made a god. Vespasian evidently preferred to remain a living human.


    Art Deco, you are in error.

    "The inclusion of Caius Julius Caesar's statue in the procession of those of the gods at the opening ceremonies of the games, and the placing of more statues in and around the temples on the Capitol suggested a status that was somewhat more than human."

    "When news had reached Rome of the victory at Thapsus, a statue of Caesar had been set up showing him standing on a globe with an inscrption on the pedestal reading 'To the Unconquered God,' but Caesar odered this erased after his return."

    "After Pharsalus, Caesar had already been formally referred to as a god in the honors and decrees of Hellenistic communities in the provinces."

    Second, Domitian deified himself while alive. He was a living god. This was necessary because he was so at odds with the Senate. A god does not wait to be recognized as such by humans, especially, senators. Either you are a god-man or you are not.

    Jesus was a living god? Is that your point? What Senate or Sanhedrin declared him a living god? Jesus was a living god and Julius Caesar was not? Is that your point?

    Moses did miracles. Jesus did miracles. Doing miracles does not make one more than a prophet who can do miracles.


    I'm quoting a Yale University Press 2006 book, Caesar: Life of a Colossus.
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    Feb 24, 2016 2:30 AM GMT
    Caesar: Life of a Colossus has, today, 171 amazon reviews averaging more than 4 stars.

    As for Domitian self-declaring himself deified, he was in good company: Augustus self-declared himself son of god. A figure of the empire had that title before Jesus, a figure in a territory of the Roman empire, had it.
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    Feb 24, 2016 5:16 PM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    Art Deco, you are in error.

    I am not in error. In ancient Rome only the Senate could declare someone a god. In Julius Caesar's case this was not done until after his death. The referral to him in god-like terms in the provinces, or during celebrations, was hyperbole.

    Although the adoration Caesar supposedly received during his lifetime was used as a cause for personal envy that resulted in his assassination, as fictionally related in Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar". Where Caesar is also referred to as a god (but inaccurately in the context of this thread). Because the conspirator Cassius is trying to win over Brutus, by slandering Caesar in every way he can.

    Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus; and we petty men
    Walk under his huge legs and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonorable graves.


    But that was Shakespeare, not actual history.
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    Feb 25, 2016 2:08 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC said
    Art Deco, you are in error.

    I am not in error. In ancient Rome only the Senate could declare someone a god. In Julius Caesar's case this was not done until after his death. The referral to him in god-like terms in the provinces, or during celebrations, was hyperbole.

    Although the adoration Caesar supposedly received during his lifetime was used as a cause for personal envy that resulted in his assassination, as fictionally related in Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar". Where Caesar is also referred to as a god (but inaccurately in the context of this thread). Because the conspirator Cassius is trying to win over Brutus, by slandering Caesar in every way he can.

    Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus; and we petty men
    Walk under his huge legs and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonorable graves.


    But that was Shakespeare, not actual history.


    You don't have the goods to prove you're not in error. You are right: Shakespeare is not actual history and is not a good for proving you're not in error.

    Quote some historians who would write Julius Caesar's life, while he was living, say, in the last 2 years of his life, was not exceptional enough for the highest praise--with the highest praise including being called a god. When they ran out of accolades, they started calling him a god which made the Senate's deification of him after death a non-brainer.

    The People's deification before death, the life on its own merit, and self-declaration by an emperor carry weight. And, as for the intent of the emperor carrying weight on who is deified or not, self or brother, or father, there is no doubt the Flavians were deified partly due to their own weight on the Senate.

    Now, returning to what you would like to say:

    Jesus was a living god? Is that your point? What Senate or Sanhedrin declared him a living god?

    Jesus was a living god and Julius Caesar was not?
    Jesus was a living god and Domitian was not?
    Jesus was a son of god and Octavian Augustus was not?



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    Feb 25, 2016 2:10 AM GMT
    The praise Julius Caesar received was not hyperbole.
    His hero status and "father of our country" status were not hyperbole.
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    Feb 25, 2016 2:38 AM GMT
    StephenOABC saidThe praise Julius Caesar received was not hyperbole.
    His hero status and "father of our country" status were not hyperbole.

    "pater patriae" (father of his country) is not a term of divinity. Nor is "pater familias" (father of his family), which every male head of a Roman family carried. (A term also applied to a landowner). I was taught in classical Latin, read Caesar in the original Latin, as well as Cicero and other authors.

    I really think you're out of your depth here. But then your previous attempts at theology have been notable for their eccentricity, with little adherence to historical accuracy.
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    Feb 26, 2016 3:03 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC saidThe praise Julius Caesar received was not hyperbole.
    His hero status and "father of our country" status were not hyperbole.

    "pater patriae" (father of his country) is not a term of divinity. Nor is "pater familias" (father of his family), which every male head of a Roman family carried. (A term also applied to a landowner). I was taught in classical Latin, read Caesar in the original Latin, as well as Cicero and other authors.

    I really think you're out of your depth here. But then your previous attempts at theology have been notable for their eccentricity, with little adherence to historical accuracy.


    Again, you are in error.

    I know father of his country is not a term of divinity. It is an accolade. It was made in the context that he was given so many accolades that one could only go to god-man.
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    Feb 26, 2016 4:17 AM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC saidThe praise Julius Caesar received was not hyperbole.
    His hero status and "father of our country" status were not hyperbole.

    "pater patriae" (father of his country) is not a term of divinity. Nor is "pater familias" (father of his family), which every male head of a Roman family carried. (A term also applied to a landowner). I was taught in classical Latin, read Caesar in the original Latin, as well as Cicero and other authors.

    I really think you're out of your depth here. But then your previous attempts at theology have been notable for their eccentricity, with little adherence to historical accuracy.

    Again, you are in error.

    I know father of his country is not a term of divinity. It is an accolade. It was made in the context that he was given so many accolades that one could only go to god-man.

    A Roman General afforded a Triumph by the Senate was treated as a demi-god, it wasn't just Caesar. But it was only for the period of the Triumph celebration. He was dressed in a painted "toga picta" that simulated the appearance of the chief Roman deity Jupiter, in his temple on Capitoline Hill, where the triumphal procession wound from the Campus Martius (Field of Mars, honoring the Roman god of war).

    And as the General rode in his triumphal chariot, a slave, either walking behind or even in the chariot itself, would say: "Remember thou art mortal". (Some more florid Victorian-era translations from Latin render it as "Remember thou art but mortal man". A more terse Latin formulation that was apparently also used was "Remember death")

    The object was to prevent the General, and that would include Caesar during his own Triumph, from letting these honors make him begin to believe he really was a god. Since gods don't die, but mortals do.

    Therefore, you are confusing passing ceremonial honors with formal deification. Julius Caesar was never considered an actual god during his lifetime
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    Feb 27, 2016 4:13 AM GMT
    Art-Deco

    Julius Caesar was never considered an actual god during his lifetime

    Stephenoabc

    1]
    Roman men, in private life were gods of their families.
    For someone of Julius Caesar's stature, his private godhood extended beyond his own home, empowering the families of others.

    2]
    Emperor worship was not only, or even primarily, directed to the dead emperor and their relatives as some of the literary resources would have us believe; but the living emperor was also worshiped.

    Those who spend time with the material evidence of temples, sacrifices, priesthoods, conclude that the emperors received worship as gods.

    For 2], see The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context. Also see The Divination of Caesar and August by Koortbojan.

    For 1] If need be, I have a book in my personal library that I can suggest.

    An 11th grade understanding of history and of mortals as gods is lacking in sophistication, understanding of Roman private life (lacking in an advanced understanding of Roman culture) and lacking in an understanding of emperor worship while the emperor was alive.

    A definitive position cannot be based solely on one aspect of the political context, what the Senate did. That would be, as I have judged your responses, an erroneous understanding of man-god status and man-god imperial worship.

    In a way, it would lead to a misunderstanding of the Roman context in which one finds Jesus as a god-man.

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    Apr 03, 2016 8:04 PM GMT
    Another reason for not getting your Ancient Roman History from Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar:

    By way of a New York Post book review--ugh, but, despite the messenger

    The real story behind the assassination of Julius Caesar
    By Larry Getlen March 1, 2015


    On Feb. 15, in the year 44 BC, Julius Caesar, the all-powerful ruler of Rome, visited a soothsayer named Spurinna, who “predicted the future by examining the internal organs of sacrificial animals,” among other omens.

    As per the ritual, Caesar “sacrificed a bull,” and Spurinna “made the chilling announcement that the beast had no heart.”

    Brave Caesar was “unmoved,” but Spurinna said that he feared Caesar’s life “might come to a bad end,” and warned the dictator that “his life would be in danger for the next 30 days.”

    He did not say anything about the “Ides of March,” just one difference of many between the version of Caesar’s assassination presented by William Shakespeare and the likely truth, according to Cornell University history professor Barry Strauss’ new book, “The Death of Caesar.” Strauss pored through ancient texts to determine the truest possible version of the events surrounding the assassination of the legendary leader.

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    Apr 03, 2016 8:40 PM GMT
    Caesar understood how to nurture the love of his people. His soldiers were well-paid, and he passed laws (over the Senate’s objections) helping the poor, including protecting them from abusive government officials.

    NY Post Review of the book
    “The Death of Caesar:
    The Story of History’s Most Famous Assassination”
    by Barry Strauss
    (Simon & Schuster)
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    Apr 03, 2016 9:10 PM GMT
    Dictator perpetuo (English: "dictator in perpetuity"), also called dictator in perpetuum,[1] was the office held by Julius Caesar from 26 January or 15 February of the year 44 BCE until his death on 15 March.[2] By abandoning the time restrictions usually applied in the case of the Roman dictatura, it elevated Caesar's dictatorship into the monarchical sphere.


    49 BCE
    Julius Caesar held the dictator position for only eleven days in 49 BCE

    48/47 BCE
    and again for the year 48/47 BCE.

    46 BCE
    In 46 BCE, he was elected dictator for the next ten years.

    44 BCE
    At some point between January and February 44 BCE he was appointed dictator perpetuo, but was assassinated less than two months later (on the Ides of March).[3]

    Dictator perpetuo is often mistranslated as "dictator for life", but the title did not imply that Caesar would never resign it.

    Weinstock has argued that the perpetual dictatorship was part of the senatorial decrees regarding Caesar's divine honors, as well as his planned apotheosis as Divus Iulius, a complex of honors aimed at eternity and divinity.[4]
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    Apr 03, 2016 9:27 PM GMT
    Sort of interesting / don't agree with all of it

    http://www.carotta.de/subseite/texte/esumma.html

    book review mentioned above (could give computers older than 2 years a problem with loading)

    http://nypost.com/2015/03/01/the-real-story-behind-the-assassination-of-julius-caesar/
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    Apr 03, 2016 11:25 PM GMT
    Art_Deco
    The Senate's declaring Julius Caesar a god was not done until after his death.


    Stephenoabc/Steefen, author of
    the play, Water Bearing Fish
    author of the nonfiction work
    The Greatest Bible Study in Historical Accuracy
    YouTube Video Writer/Narrator/Producer


    I'm reading the New York Post book review mentioned above. The paraphrase of your position is in error according to the book reviewer because the Senate's declaring Julius Caesar a god happened before his death.

    "After the obsequious [obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree] Senate declared that upon his death, Caesar would become “an official god of the Roman state,” the perception became that Caesar was too power-mad for comfort."
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    Apr 03, 2016 11:43 PM GMT
    Caesar understood how to nurture the love of his people. ...he passed laws (over the Senate’s objections) helping the poor, including protecting them from abusive government officials.

    Now, Jesus on the Poor

    Not Jesus but Proverbs 19:17 ESV
    Whoever is generous to the poor lends to the Lord, and he will repay him for his deed.

    Luke 6:20-26 ESV
    “Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God. “Blessed are you who are hungry now, for you shall be satisfied.

    Matthew 11:5 ESV
    The blind receive their sight and the lame walk, lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, and the poor have good news preached to them.

    Matthew 25:40 ESV
    And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’

    Matthew 26:11 ESV
    For you always have the poor with you, but you will not always have me.

    Biblical Jesus quoted: Isaiah 61:1-2 ESV
    The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me, because the Lord has anointed me to bring good news to the poor...