Trump and the American Identity - why he is resonating with so many

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    Feb 01, 2016 9:06 PM GMT
    A good essay on why Trump is connecting with so many disparate groups. He has touched on the idealistic what it means to be an American, and whatever his policies on specific issues, whether he changed his policies, whether is behavior is offensive to some, doesn't take away from the main point here.

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    The sine qua non of our country is in her people owning and treasuring their American identity.

    There exists a divide among people in America. It doesn’t have to do with gender, the color of one’s skin or one’s social status; it has to do with wanting to be an American. Wanting to be American is the main issue facing 146 million voters this election cycle. And it isn’t a coincidence that political correctness which takes away national identity has been causing our country to go bankrupt while reducing our status among other countries.
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    Only one of the candidates in the presidential race has his finger on the issue: Donald Trump. No matter what some may think of his personality, his hairstyle, his awkward attempts to speak about faith, he is indisputably right when it comes to knowing what will reboot our great country.

    Trump has diagnosed the cause of America’s decline. He has repeated many times that “If you don’t have borders, you don’t have a country.” Each issue with which he engages -- be it building a wall, replacing Obamacare, or eliminating Common Core -- is connected to American identity.

    No borders -- no country. No money or jobs -- no country. No unity -- no country. No sovereignty -- no country. Trump understands this, and he wants America to last for generations. He knows that this is a pivotal moment in American history. We are on the brink of implosion. If people fail to seize now the character which defines America, then communism, Marxism and socialism will have conquered the world.

    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2016/02/trump_and_the_american_identity.html
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    Feb 01, 2016 10:00 PM GMT
    Trump resonates all right - like the proverbial empty vessel.

    He promises to make America great again, without saying how.

    He's embraced universal healthcare for all, then said that it’s too expensive, then said that he was in favour of comprehensive health insurance for every American.

    He's promised to make Mexico pay for an impenetrable wall on the Rio Grande, only to say later that he was just kidding.

    He's made the utterly unenforceable promise to ban all Muslims from entering America.

    He believes his supporters are morons, which is about the only thing he is right about.




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    Feb 01, 2016 10:22 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidTrump resonates all right - like the proverbial empty vessel.

    He promises to make America great again, without saying how.

    He's embraced universal healthcare for all, then said that it’s too expensive, then said that he was in favour of comprehensive health insurance for every American.

    He's promised to make Mexico pay for an impenetrable wall on the Rio Grande, only to say later that he was just kidding.

    He's made the utterly unenforceable promise to ban all Muslims from entering America.

    He believes his supporters are morons, which is about the only thing he is right about.

    The only reason I interacted with you in the thread about emails is you raised questions without being snarky that I though others who were equally uninformed might ask, but now you are back to your normal self.
    1) His position on Obamacare is clear.
    2) When did he say he was kidding about Mexico paying for a wall? Never heard that. He did at one point elaborate and say there were various mechanisms, including a tariff.
    3) The only reason we can't stop Muslim immigration at present is our unsecured border. It can certainly be done legally, regardless of if it is the best thing to do without some exceptions. The Constitution does not provide equal rights to immigrate. In fact, current policy allows discrimination based on national origin.
    4) I haven't decided who I will ultimately vote for, but I do support Trump, so you're calling me a moron. Denigrating people from another country who don't support positions in their own country is totally classless. You're the moron, and totally obsessed with our politics. You have a mental problem driving your obsession.
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    Feb 01, 2016 10:41 PM GMT
    He's going to fire every American for slave cheap labor! Why don't we elect the Walton's as US president too! icon_rolleyes.gif


    tumblr_mofiyk7Rdm1suadn1o1_400.gif


    The Trump Organization
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trump_Organization

    The organization is owned and managed by the Trump family with Donald Trump as its CEO and three of his eldest children—Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump, and Eric Trump—serving as EVPs within the organization.





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    Feb 01, 2016 10:51 PM GMT
    socalfitness saidI haven't decided who I will ultimately vote for, but I do support Trump, so you're calling me a moron. Denigrating people from another country who don't support positions in their own country is totally classless. You're the moron, and totally obsessed with our politics. You have a mental problem driving your obsession.


    Sorry, Socal, I was under the impression Trump supporters enjoyed crass, knockabout political discourse. It seems that's only the case when it is being used by Trump, rather than against him (and his uncritical supporters).
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    Feb 02, 2016 1:27 AM GMT
    Right on!!

    Right on!!!

    RIGHT ON!!!!!


    Trump is not owned by anybody....and when was the last time we had a major party candidate who could say that? But more than that, is Trump gets it. We are losing our country to out of control debt, political correctness from pressure groups and criminals posing as DC policy wonks.

    We are in the midst of something very new and very big.

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    Feb 02, 2016 7:23 PM GMT
    daily%20news%20donald%20trump%20clown.jp
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Feb 02, 2016 7:31 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidTrump resonates all right - like the proverbial empty vessel.

    He promises to make America great again, without saying how.

    He's embraced universal healthcare for all, then said that it’s too expensive, then said that he was in favour of comprehensive health insurance for every American.

    He's promised to make Mexico pay for an impenetrable wall on the Rio Grande, only to say later that he was just kidding.

    He's made the utterly unenforceable promise to ban all Muslims from entering America.

    He believes his supporters are morons, which is about the only thing he is right about.








    Quoted for it's "Real World" truth.



    icon_idea.gif
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    Feb 02, 2016 7:33 PM GMT
    It should be interesting to see how Trump does in California, after all we're the morons who've twice now elected actors for governor.
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    Feb 02, 2016 7:37 PM GMT
    rnch said
    Ex_Mil8 saidTrump resonates all right - like the proverbial empty vessel.

    He promises to make America great again, without saying how.

    He's embraced universal healthcare for all, then said that it’s too expensive, then said that he was in favour of comprehensive health insurance for every American.

    He's promised to make Mexico pay for an impenetrable wall on the Rio Grande, only to say later that he was just kidding.

    He's made the utterly unenforceable promise to ban all Muslims from entering America.

    He believes his supporters are morons, which is about the only thing he is right about.


    Quoted for it's "Real World" truth.
    icon_idea.gif

    Totally false as I pointed out later. Expected from TheVillageIdiot.
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    Feb 02, 2016 7:48 PM GMT
    Early days, but I think Rubio will end up as the nominee, which (assuming she's nominated) will be Clinton's biggest headache. I think Cruz will go quietly, but I can easily see Trump's ego being unable to resist running as an independent - which could be Rubio's biggest headache: 1992 all over again?

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    Feb 02, 2016 8:04 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidEarly days, but I think Rubio will end up as the nominee, which (assuming she's nominated) will be Clinton's biggest headache. I think Cruz will go quietly, but I can easily see Trump's ego being unable to resist running as an independent - which could be Rubio's biggest headache: 1992 all over again?


    Clinton's biggest headache is Bernie Sanders.

    Bernie is taking this all the way to the convention. Unlike typical party line Democrats, Bernie will never fall in line behind the corrupt Clinton machine. He'd rather morph his supporters into a political movement.
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    Feb 02, 2016 8:18 PM GMT
    S2Ki said

    Clinton's biggest headache is Bernie Sanders.

    Bernie is taking this all the way to the convention. Unlike typical party line Democrats, Bernie will never fall in line behind the corrupt Clinton machine. He'd rather morph his supporters into a political movement.


    I did say "assuming she's nominated". There's still the possibility the email thing could go pear-shaped and, of course, Sanders might pull off an upset. But O'Malley is currently polling at 4% and it's a pretty safe bet his support will end up going to Clinton. Also, as the race progresses, I think realpolitik will kick in with many pro-Sanders Dems (as it already appears to have done with many pro-Trump Republicans).
  • carew28

    Posts: 661

    Feb 02, 2016 8:49 PM GMT
    An awful lot of working-people are now depending upon the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) for their health-insurance. And even the middle-class, who get their health-insurance through their employer, and don't depend upon it, have relatives (parents, sons/daighters, siblings, etc.) who are now depending upon it. A lot of adults are now working at lower-paying jobs, even minimum-wage jobs. The call for getting rid of the Affordable Care Act doesn't seem to be resonating as much as it did a few years ago. Times have changed.

    I think a lot of the public has caught on to the empty rhetoric of creating better-paying jobs, which all politicians talk about, but which isn't likely to happen for most people. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. People don't want to give up their health-insurance, as minimal as it may be, for empty platitudes about better jobs coming in the future. They no longer put any faith in political promises.


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    Feb 02, 2016 8:51 PM GMT
    carew28 saidAn awful lot of working-people are now depending upon the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) for their health-insurance. And even the middle-class, who get their health-insurance through their employer, and don't depend upon it, have relatives (parents, sons/daighters, siblings, etc.) who are now depending upon it. A lot of adults are now working at lower-paying jobs, even minimum-wage jobs. The call for getting rid of the Affordable Care Act doesn't seem to be resonating as much as it did a few years ago. Times have changed.

    I think a lot of the public has caught on to the empty rhetoric of creating better-paying jobs, which all politicians talk about, but which isn't likely to happen for most people. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. People don't want to give up their health-insurance, as minimal as it may be, for empty platitudes about better jobs coming in the future. They no longer put any faith in political promises.

    Obamacare helps those at the low income level, but those roughly in the middle class who don't qualify for subsidies are hit with high premiums and extremely high deductibles.
  • carew28

    Posts: 661

    Feb 02, 2016 9:37 PM GMT
    socalfitness said
    carew28 saidAn awful lot of working-people are now depending upon the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) for their health-insurance. And even the middle-class, who get their health-insurance through their employer, and don't depend upon it, have relatives (parents, sons/daighters, siblings, etc.) who are now depending upon it. A lot of adults are now working at lower-paying jobs, even minimum-wage jobs. The call for getting rid of the Affordable Care Act doesn't seem to be resonating as much as it did a few years ago. Times have changed.

    I think a lot of the public has caught on to the empty rhetoric of creating better-paying jobs, which all politicians talk about, but which isn't likely to happen for most people. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. People don't want to give up their health-insurance, as minimal as it may be, for empty platitudes about better jobs coming in the future. They no longer put any faith in political promises.

    Obamacare helps those at the low income level, but those roughly in the middle class who don't qualify for subsidies are hit with high premiums and extremely high deductibles.



    True enough. But the premiums have been going up steadily for the past 10 years, long before Obamacare. And insurance companies began putting high deductibles in place around 8 or 10 years ago. The premiums were reaching about 25 % of the gross pay of a minimum-wage employee, which was past the point of being sustainable. At least with Obamacare, the premiums are based upon income.

    I think a lot of middle-class people are thinking " there but for the grace of God, go I". They know they're lucky not to be down at the Obamacare income level. But for a lot of them, they have relatives and family-members at that level, and they're no longer so opposed to Obamacare, and are willing to bear with it, for the sake of their relatives. The more people you personally know who are depending upon Obamacare for their health-insurance, especially family and friends, the less likely you are to oppose it, even if you're not depending upon it yourself.
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    Feb 02, 2016 9:43 PM GMT
    carew28 said
    socalfitness said
    carew28 saidAn awful lot of working-people are now depending upon the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) for their health-insurance. And even the middle-class, who get their health-insurance through their employer, and don't depend upon it, have relatives (parents, sons/daighters, siblings, etc.) who are now depending upon it. A lot of adults are now working at lower-paying jobs, even minimum-wage jobs. The call for getting rid of the Affordable Care Act doesn't seem to be resonating as much as it did a few years ago. Times have changed.

    I think a lot of the public has caught on to the empty rhetoric of creating better-paying jobs, which all politicians talk about, but which isn't likely to happen for most people. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. People don't want to give up their health-insurance, as minimal as it may be, for empty platitudes about better jobs coming in the future. They no longer put any faith in political promises.

    Obamacare helps those at the low income level, but those roughly in the middle class who don't qualify for subsidies are hit with high premiums and extremely high deductibles.

    True enough. But the premiums have been going up steadily for the past 10 years, long before Obamacare. And insurance companies began putting high deductibles in place around 8 or 10 years ago. The premiums were reaching about 25 % of the gross pay of a minimum-wage employee, which was past the point of being sustainable. At least with Obamacare, the premiums are based upon income.

    I think a lot of middle-class people are thinking " there but for the grace of God, go I". They know they're lucky not to be down at the Obamacare income level. But for a lot of them, they have relatives and family-members at that level, and they're no longer so opposed to Obamacare, and are willing to bear with it, for the sake of their relatives.

    No question the system needed fixing. During the meeting at Blair House, Republicans suggested two things to improve Obamacare and reduce costs, tort reform and insurance portability across state lines. Both were rejected because the insurance companies and trial lawyers were special interests to the party in power.