Titanic II set to sail in 2018

  • onlyawhisper

    Posts: 61

    Feb 11, 2016 1:32 PM GMT
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/australasia/titanic-ii-fully-functioning-replica-of-original-ship-to-set-sail-in-20-a6862796.html

    A fully functioning replica of RMS Titanic is set to launch in 2018, 106 years after the original vessel sunk in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    This updated version, named Titanic II, is the brainchild of Australian billionaire Clive Palmer and his company, Blue Star Line.

    While it will look virtually identical to the 1912 cruise ship, it will be four metres wider, with its hull welded together rather than riveted due to modern maritime safety requirements.

    Unlike the original, the new ship will have enough lifeboats, along with marine evacuation systems - and a boat deck housing replicas of the original lifeboats.

    The replica ship wlll be 270 metres long, 53 metres high and weigh 40,000 tonnes, according to the Belfast Telegraph.

    Like the original, Titanic II will offer first, second and third class tickets.

    It will have nine floors and 840 cabins to accommodate 2,400 passengers and 900 crew members.

    The liner will have a swimming pool, Turkish baths and gyms.

    James McDonald, the marketing director of Blue Star Line said: "The new Titanic will of course have modern evacuation procedures, satellite controls, digital navigation and radar systems and all those things you'd expect on a 21st century ship.

    "We are not looking for investment from Dubai, as it is a project we are funding ourselves, but we have been in contact with a number of companies based in the Emirates who are looking at utilising opportunities that arises with the project

    "It is people looking to use the opportunity of the trademark and licensing potential of the project... We own the Titanic II name and trademark and people are lining up to be part of it."

    The maiden voyage will be from Jiangsu in Eastern China to Dubai and not like its namesake from Southampton to New York.

    The original Titanic sank on its maiden voyage in 1912 after colliding with an iceberg in the North Atlantic - killing more than 1,500 passengers and crew.


    I was just thinking about this and research it last week. So cool to see that it's actually happening! [
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    Feb 11, 2016 1:45 PM GMT
    I have to ask but why? There's something unsettling to me about this. It's akin to me starting a wilderness tour guide company and calling it Donner Party Back Country Tours LLC.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Feb 11, 2016 5:06 PM GMT
    I think it's fun. A bit unsettling, I agree. When it does the Southampton-New York run, I wonder if they'll take it over the spot where the original is resting. That would be eerie but kind of nice, too. Do the cruise in period clothes?
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Feb 11, 2016 5:20 PM GMT
    If it were really a replica it would use coal fired steam for propulsion, two 4-cylinder triple expansion reciprocating steam engines driving the outside propellers, and a steam turbine driving the center propeller. I bet it doesn't; probably it's Diesel.
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    Feb 11, 2016 5:40 PM GMT
    I WANT TO BE ON THAT SHIP
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Feb 11, 2016 6:13 PM GMT
    Titanic had 2 sister ships, one was called the Britannic which sank 4 years after, it was hit by a torpedo or mine in the Aegean sea, luckily not many people were on board because it was converted into a hospital ship and was on its way to pick up the wounded, it sank and is still there and is the property of the british government.
    The other ship called the Olympic had various mishaps but carried on sailing and was eventually decommissioned and dismantled, several people died after it collided with another ship before it was towed to a ship yard to her doom.

    So with the history of these ships, I won't be boarding the new one because I do not want to temp fate, I bet something will happen to it at some point, having said that I may out of curiosity have a look inside while docked but will not set sail on her, will be interesting to see the interior after watching the film called Titanic and see if there are any similarities between them.
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    Feb 11, 2016 6:20 PM GMT
    I hope God sinks it again and everyone on board dies of the plague v. 2.0.

    I'm gonna be so thrilled if that happens. the curse lives on!

    and I'm so bored with everyone continually making a remake of life.

    really they all deserve to die.

  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Feb 11, 2016 6:45 PM GMT
    patito saidI hope God sinks it again and everyone on board dies of the plague v. 2.0.

    I'm gonna be so thrilled if that happens. the curse lives on!

    and I'm so bored with everyone continually making a remake of life.

    really they all deserve to die.


    You can't enjoy the past while also loving the present? Getting excited about the future? Why be so limited?
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    Feb 11, 2016 7:10 PM GMT
    The new ship also plans to have the same class system as the Titanic
    I'd need to know if I'm in steerage will I be locked below deck?! lol
    I would hope to keep good karma that on its first voyage that it stop at the are the original sank and a moment of silence be observed and flowers placed over board for those lost.
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    Feb 11, 2016 7:13 PM GMT
    sigh

    no I don't really feel like wasting my life on responding to ubiquitous losers who have been on my shit list for a while now.

  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Feb 11, 2016 7:57 PM GMT
    Sounds interesting. I like the idea of period crusing, with all the paraphenalia like clothes, even customs, etc.
    Although not the worse maritme shipping disaster in terms of loss of life by any means, there is something highly evocative and romantic about the Titanic and it`s fate.
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    Feb 11, 2016 8:30 PM GMT
    interestingchap saidTitanic had 2 sister ships, one was called the Britannic which sank 4 years after, it was hit by a torpedo or mine in the Aegean sea, luckily not many people were on board because it was converted into a hospital ship and was on its way to pick up the wounded, it sank and is still there and is the property of the british government.
    The other ship called the Olympic had various mishaps but carried on sailing and was eventually decommissioned and dismantled, several people died after it collided with another ship before it was towed to a ship yard to her doom.

    So with the history of these ships, I won't be boarding the new one because I do not want to temp fate, I bet something will happen to it at some point, having said that I may out of curiosity have a look inside while docked but will not set sail on her, will be interesting to see the interior after watching the film called Titanic and see if there are any similarities between them.


    Olympic was called "old reliable". The early mishap with the Hawk was due to the wake of the large ship.

    What about bathrooms? Will they be shared? It's being welded. Not riveted. And is wider. There will have to be many changes. By today's standards the ship itself is small. It's like recreating a 1912 Renault.

    There have been many attempts to recreate Titanic. I doubt this will pan out either. It's another stunt to raise money.
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    Feb 11, 2016 9:28 PM GMT
    Lincsbear saidSounds interesting. I like the idea of period crusing, with all the paraphenalia like clothes, even customs, etc.
    Although not the worse maritme shipping disaster in terms of loss of life by any means, there is something highly evocative and romantic about the Titanic and it`s fate.

    Some of these disaster lists exclude wartime. The greatest US peacetime loss of life was actually on the Mississippi River, not the ocean. Happened in 1865 near Memphis, Tennessee. An estimated 1800 people (passenger records were not precise) were killed when the boilers of the side-wheeler "Sultana" exploded and the wooden ship burned completely.

    River boats never carried that many passengers. But the Civil War had just ended, President Lincoln assassinated a few days earlier. Released Northern prisoners of war were packed on board to take them to New Orleans. When the Sultana sank, the Mississippi was in Spring flood. Most freed prisoners were emaciated and weakened from Confederate prison camps. They quickly drowned, within sight of the river banks. Steamboats of that era carried no life rafts.

    As for a faux Titanic, a friend of mine in the travel industry says this is not a new ship, but a refitted existing one. I dunno. But a ship that "small" by today's standards will likely not be as comfortable at sea as larger vessels, with modern trim devices. Other than taking a trip back into history, I can't see the actual sailing appeal.
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    Feb 11, 2016 10:04 PM GMT
    I think they should bring back dirigibles. What was that movie where there was one that had a swanky passenger area? One of the Raiders of the Lost Ark movies? I wonder how long a transatlantic trip would take in one; sort of the inverse of the Concorde in speed.
  • onlyawhisper

    Posts: 61

    Feb 11, 2016 10:50 PM GMT
    I'm hoping they don't go too far with making this ship as close to the original as possible. What I'm saying is, I hope it has the same layout/dimensions as the original ship, except with modern technology (TVs, WiFi, etc). It should give passengers the feel and experience of a modern day cruise ship while still trying to preserve the look and feel of the original Titanic aesthetically (have the grand staircase!).

    I think I read somewhere that passengers will be offered clothes from that time period...just...no.
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    Feb 11, 2016 11:07 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI think they should bring back dirigibles. What was that movie where there was one that had a swanky passenger area? One of the Raiders of the Lost Ark movies? I wonder how long a transatlantic trip would take in one; sort of the inverse of the Concorde in speed.

    That was the "Holy Grail" entry in the Raiders series. And the zeppelin interior was recreated fairly accurately to the original. All the furniture was aluminum, to save weight, in a simplified art deco style.

    The Hindenburg originally had an aluminum grand piano, as well, instead of one with a cast iron frame and heavy wood case, the construction method that exists to this day (my own Steinway grand weighed nearly 1000 pounds, my full upright model 550). But its sound on the airship was sub-standard and it was soon removed.

    The biggest problem with super-derigibles is that they are fragile in rough weather, and difficult to handle. That is what destroyed the USS Akron, with a greater loss of life than the Hindenburg. Likewise its sister ship the USS Macon was destroyed in a storm, due to frame failure.

    Hindenburg passenger floor plan. Not shown are the 16 gas cells that filled the space within the aluminum framework. Nor the steel bracing cables (that some speculate caused the disaster when one snapped and ruptured a gas cell), and the crew catwalk that ran the length of the ship.The hydrogen wasn't "free" inside like the helium in a blimp:

    1280px-Diagram_of_Hindenburg_interior_19

    h16_96119948.jpg

    7b772610c3ae1e8ff213dcf596af7cb6.jpg

    Reading & writing room:

    17756137bdf44f42531525a7e4202c6b.jpg

    Here's a view of the Hindenburg on the ground, with people to give some scale (those tiny dark dots). These airships were almost inconceivably gigantic, even by modern standards. In the 1930s they must have been mind boggling. Note the Olympic rings on the side. It flew over the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games, to demonstrate German might and technical prowess.

    IMG_4309_zpsxoxv8ppd.jpg
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    Feb 12, 2016 12:20 AM GMT
    In comparison, here's a flying boat or "Clipper Ship" built by Boeing for transatlantic service during the same era. Indiana Jones flies in something like this in the first movie. If this image is too large for your browser's window, try dragging it out onto the desktop. Like the Zepplins, there's a degree of opulence & space here we don't have nowadays, with some few exceptions. Instead, we fly in packed sardine cans.

    BTW, I find the crew member servicing the engine kinda comical. Looks like he's cranking the damn thing. Musta been fun crawling through the wing to get there, and damn deafening.

    Life-37-08-03-Clipper-Ship-Cross-Section


    314-Diagram_zpsj8zujssm.jpg
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Feb 12, 2016 1:01 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Lincsbear saidSounds interesting. I like the idea of period crusing, with all the paraphenalia like clothes, even customs, etc.
    Although not the worse maritme shipping disaster in terms of loss of life by any means, there is something highly evocative and romantic about the Titanic and it`s fate.

    Some of these disaster lists exclude wartime. The greatest US peacetime loss of life was actually on the Mississippi River, not the ocean. Happened in 1865 near Memphis, Tennessee. An estimated 1800 people (passenger records were not precise) were killed when the boilers of the side-wheeler "Sultana" exploded and the wooden ship burned completely.

    River boats never carried that many passengers. But the Civil War had just ended, President Lincoln assassinated a few days earlier. Released Northern prisoners of war were packed on board to take them to New Orleans. When the Sultana sank, the Mississippi was in Spring flood. Most freed prisoners were emaciated and weakened from Confederate prison camps. They quickly drowned, within site of the river banks. Steamboats of that era carried no life rafts.

    As for a faux Titanic, a friend of mine in the travel industry says this is not a new ship, but a refitted existing one. I dunno. But a ship that "small" by today's standards will likely not be a comfortable at sea as larger vessels, with modern trim devices. Other than taking a trip back into history, I can't see the actual sailing appeal.


    "The greatest US peacetime loss of life was actually on the Mississippi River, not the ocean. Happened in 1865 near Memphis, Tennessee. An estimated 1800 people (passenger records were not precise) were killed when the boilers of the side-wheeler "Sultana" exploded and the wooden ship burned completely."

    I learned about that when I visited Memphis while on a motorcycle trip. Although the cause of the explosion is not known for sure, it is speculated that it may have been caused by a coal bomb, i.e., a bomb disguised as a piece of coal, that exploded when fed into the boiler. On the other hand, boiler explosions on river boats were not exactly rare. The boat was very overloaded when the explosion occurred.
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    Feb 12, 2016 2:05 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    "The greatest US peacetime loss of life was actually on the Mississippi River, not the ocean. Happened in 1865 near Memphis, Tennessee. An estimated 1800 people (passenger records were not precise) were killed when the boilers of the side-wheeler "Sultana" exploded and the wooden ship burned completely."

    I learned about that when I visited Memphis while on a motorcycle trip. Although the cause of the explosion is not known for sure, it is speculated that it may have been caused by a coal bomb, i.e., a bomb disguised as a piece of coal, that exploded when fed into the boiler. On the other hand, boiler explosions on river boats were not exactly rare. The boat was very overloaded when the explosion occurred.

    That's based, I believe, on a questionable death-bed confession some 20 years later by a former Confederate saboteur, who damaged other Union river shipping.

    But what is known is that 1 of the 4 boilers was in need of urgent repair. The Sultana's Captain didn't want to delay the 4 days required, because he feared his former Union prisoners, for whom he was getting a transport bounty ($5 for every enlisted soldier, $10 for Officers) might be transferred to other ships.

    So he ordered slapdash patchwork repairs done in 1 day. The river was in early Spring flood, and the boilers and engines were straining. The boat, due to being top-heavy with overloading, was listing back and forth, possibly causing boiler water levels to become erratic and creating overheating issues with overpressure.

    Accounts of the explosion's location suggest the badly repaired boiler failed first, taking 2 other boilers with it in quick succession. This is the conclusion most investigators determined at the time.

    BTW, you're correct, riverboat boiler explosions were common. And the normal service life of a river steamer was only about 5 years. Mark Twain refers to this in some of his writings. He'd been a riverboat Pilot (handled the wheel, but the Captain commanded the entire vessel).
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    Feb 12, 2016 3:27 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Art_Deco saidBTW, I find the crew member servicing the engine kinda comical. Looks like he's cranking the damn thing. Musta been fun crawling through the wing to get there, and damn deafening.

    Life-37-08-03-Clipper-Ship-Cross-Section


    I don't think the crew had to service the engine while it was running Kolonel. They have mx shops for that kind of thing. icon_rolleyes.gif


    What kind of a Kolonel is he?

    He sounds like one of these....

    colonel_wilhelm_klink_by_inhonoredglory-
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    Feb 12, 2016 4:01 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidI have to ask but why? There's something unsettling to me about this. It's akin to me starting a wilderness tour guide company and calling it Donner Party Back Country Tours LLC.


    +1 - I agree, some things in life should be left as is…what next they will rebuild replica of the Luisitania that was sunk by a German U-Boat in 1915 and 1201 lives were lost and then propelled the US to get involved in WWI. Although, she could out maneuver any German UBoat or German Steam Liners... that morning passing the Irish coast there was fog and the captain could not determine its location precisely so he asked the head engineer to decrease speed which then a U-Boat saw her as prime target and fire its torpedo.
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    Feb 12, 2016 4:24 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    I don't think the crew had to service the engine while it was running Kolonel. They have mx shops for that kind of thing. icon_rolleyes.gif

    You don't THINK, Mr. Klown? Boeing produced a cut-away 80 years ago showing that guy up in the engine nacelle while the plane is in flight, not while it was having ground service, and called it a "Wing STATION". Guess you know better than them and Pan American Airways.

    Fact of the matter is the engine instrumentation of that era was minimal compared to today. A weakness of period engines was their fuel and oil lines. The only way to detect leaks before they could cause a fire or begin to lose oil pressure with resulting engine loss was by visual inspection.

    These planes were flying unprecedented non-stop distances for commercial service never attempted before, and over the ocean. That's why they were designed as flying "boats". (As well as because of the lack of adequate runways in some destinations)

    The engines required constant monitoring. If a problem was detected the pilot would have to determine if that engine needed to be shut down before a catastrophic condition developed.
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    Feb 12, 2016 7:47 AM GMT
    If he doesn't go bankrupt first? Have talked with the old man, about what an exciting experience this would be.
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    Feb 12, 2016 8:24 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    FRE0 saidIf it were really a replica it would use coal fired steam for propulsion, two 4-cylinder triple expansion reciprocating steam engines driving the outside propellers, and a steam turbine driving the center propeller. I bet it doesn't; probably it's Diesel.


    It's a romantic notion but not a feasible one since coal is quite unhealthy to mine, transport and actually burn compared to other fossil fuels.

    Here's an interesting read:

    http://www.economist.com/news/business/21600987-cheap-ubiquitous-and-flexible-fuel-just-one-problem-fuel-future


    I always recall what I learned in my sixth grade geography class: The United States has the largest coal reserves on the planet, the "Saudi Arabia" of coal, so to speak. Were overpopulation not the world's biggest and most treacherous problem, the whole global warming issue would be nowhere near as severe as it is.
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    Feb 12, 2016 8:28 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidI have to ask but why? There's something unsettling to me about this. It's akin to me starting a wilderness tour guide company and calling it Donner Party Back Country Tours LLC.



    Agree! But love your analogy!! A wonderful California jest! If I lived at Tahoe, I'd seriously consider the name!! (Incidentally, I met one of the Donner descendants once and had a delightful conservation with him.)