CPU monitor, SpeedFan?

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    Feb 13, 2016 1:02 AM GMT


    Does anyone have experience with the computer CPU temp and fan monitor called SpeedFan? My CPU temps were constantly too high for my processor, a Intel dual core quad, max temp spec runs about 75C, I was getting just about over 100C. I just did a dust cleaning and moved my desktop case into a new position. Seems to be helping already, SpeedFan gives real time CPU temps during heavy usage and resting.





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    Feb 13, 2016 8:51 AM GMT
    I had an extra power supply from a previous computer job, I just replaced the old one with this one

    Wow, made a difference big time, esp in how the fan was acting during usage!

    SpeedFan is now monitoring temp(s) at normal range 55C, computer is super quiet now icon_biggrin.gif

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    Feb 13, 2016 9:16 AM GMT
    Holy carp! 100C is pretty crazy. icon_eek.gif

    I wonder if the old power supply's fan had failed or was blowing in the wrong direction (or was nonexistent). It's possible for the actual power itself to cause this problem, but highly unlikely.

    Depending on your mainboard you may be able to find a utility to monitor voltage levels, though it's kind of a moot point now. Glad you got that fixed! icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 13, 2016 6:26 PM GMT
    anotherphil saidHoly carp! 100C is pretty crazy. icon_eek.gif

    I wonder if the old power supply's fan had failed or was blowing in the wrong direction (or was nonexistent). It's possible for the actual power itself to cause this problem, but highly unlikely.

    Depending on your mainboard you may be able to find a utility to monitor voltage levels, though it's kind of a moot point now. Glad you got that fixed! icon_smile.gif




    Yeah, the old, Asus factory power supply could have had a voltage problem. The way the computer sounded like it was 'laboring' at certain times, especially using IE and or certain websites. Very strange, I could hear the power supply fan working and turning on but it seem to labor as far as power, affecting my entire system, so yes, it could have been a voltage leak. This would probably be caused by a sudden power outage or a electrical storm. I do have everything plugged into surge protectors for grounding, so not sure of the premature failure of the 5 year old power supply (SpeedFan checks the voltage as well)


    Will have to check the electric bill in 2 months to see if this made a difference icon_razz.gif
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    Feb 14, 2016 1:09 AM GMT
    Did you clean the fins on the CPU itself?

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    Feb 14, 2016 1:21 AM GMT
    desertmuscl saidDid you clean the fins on the CPU itself?




    Yeah, the CPU fan itself and the heat sink is actually pretty large, relative to the size of the motherboard

    I used an old small hair brush (that came with an older beard trimmer kit) to remove all the dust from behind the blades and on top of the heat sink fins



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    Feb 14, 2016 5:39 AM GMT
    Have you made sure your motherboard has the latest BIOS?

    Also, you might want to consider upgrading your CPU fan. Maybe something made of copper. Zalman makes some really nice ones.
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    Feb 14, 2016 5:21 PM GMT
    xrichx saidHave you made sure your motherboard has the latest BIOS?

    Also, you might want to consider upgrading your CPU fan. Maybe something made of copper. Zalman makes some really nice ones.


    Related to that is the thermal goop that is sandwiched between the CPU and the heat sink fins. If it was not applied evenly and liberally the thermal conduction will suffer and the CPU will run hot.

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    Feb 15, 2016 2:10 AM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    xrichx saidHave you made sure your motherboard has the latest BIOS?

    Also, you might want to consider upgrading your CPU fan. Maybe something made of copper. Zalman makes some really nice ones.


    Related to that is the thermal goop that is sandwiched between the CPU and the heat sink fins. If it was not applied evenly and liberally the thermal conduction will suffer and the CPU will run hot.





    For this reason, I don't want to replace the factory CPU cooler & fan, from what I've read, there is a certain thermal paste to use and the application of it that I am just not comfortable doing, myself. I guess I could wing it watching a video. I don't have a specific static free 'work bench' for this kind of work, but do have a static wrist band

    My system issue was probably complicated by the amount of dust build up on top of the factory Intel heat sink fins, behind the fan. I just cleaned the cooler fins and fan, no paste replacement.

    After the cleaning of the Intel cooler, fan and the replacement of the power supply w fan, temps are now normal and are being monitored with SpeedFan software. There was definitely something wrong with the power supply voltage.

    Just doing this, SpeedFan CPU cooler fan speed is 1950 RPM @ 55C



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    Feb 15, 2016 2:28 AM GMT

    aftermarket cooler is crazy! looks like for a Mini car engine! icon_lol.gif


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    Feb 15, 2016 2:53 AM GMT
    ^^ I don't much care for the sealed coolant tubes for several reasons including the fact that *if* they worked, they would only work in specific orientations; i.e., in a this-side-up configuration. Turn it 90 degrees and it may not do anything at all.

    DM's comment about thermal paste isn't incorrect, but you have to *really* screw it up to take your CPU to 100C and even then it has sufficient thermal protection built in (since about 2003-2004) to shut down before it causes itself any harm.

    Overall you've got it right; if replacing your power supply fixed most of the problem, then the power supply *was* most of the problem. I still rather suspect the fan was pointed in the wrong direction too.

    Note that the guy in your video is doing a TERRIBLE job with his thermal paste. What he's really doing is proving that it doesn't make much difference most of the time. If you want to be a perfectionist (not that it will matter) you should be sure to remove *all* residue, apply just enough to spread out over the whole CPU cover and no more, and avoid any "loops" that could result in air bubbles.

    But again, it doesn't matter. What you've done is verify that:

    1. Your power is correct, sufficient, and clean
    2. Air flow through the chassis follows a single unified constant stream (speed matters less than direction)
    3. You have enough thermal paste to eliminate air between the CPU and heatsink (that's the only thing that makes more than a couple degrees difference)
    4. Your heatsink has enough mass and surface area to collect and dissipate as much energy as is generated by your typical worst-case sustained load without taking your fan out of quiet range.

    Now as you get bigger and better heatsinks with bigger and quieter fans, you'll reap the benefits of a quieter PC. Well done. icon_cool.gif
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    Feb 15, 2016 3:15 AM GMT
    anotherphil said^^ I don't much care for the sealed coolant tubes for several reasons including the fact that *if* they worked, they would only work in specific orientations; i.e., in a this-side-up configuration. Turn it 90 degrees and it may not do anything at all.

    DM's comment about thermal paste isn't incorrect, but you have to *really* screw it up to take your CPU to 100C and even then it has sufficient thermal protection built in (since about 2003-2004) to shut down before it causes itself any harm.

    Overall you've got it right; if replacing your power supply fixed most of the problem, then the power supply *was* most of the problem. I still rather suspect the fan was pointed in the wrong direction too.

    Note that the guy in your video is doing a TERRIBLE job with his thermal paste. What he's really doing is proving that it doesn't make much difference most of the time. If you want to be a perfectionist (not that it will matter) you should be sure to remove *all* residue, apply just enough to spread out over the whole CPU cover and no more, and avoid any "loops" that could result in air bubbles.

    But again, it doesn't matter. What you've done is verify that:

    1. Your power is correct, sufficient, and clean
    2. Air flow through the chassis follows a single unified constant stream (speed matters less than direction)
    3. You have enough thermal paste to eliminate air between the CPU and heatsink (that's the only thing that makes more than a couple degrees difference)
    4. Your heatsink has enough mass and surface area to collect and dissipate as much energy as is generated by your typical worst-case sustained load without taking your fan out of quiet range.

    Now as you get bigger and better heatsinks with bigger and quieter fans, you'll reap the benefits of a quieter PC. Well done. icon_cool.gif



    Yeah, the general fan airflow direction, within the box, seems to be an issue, much like these types of window fans for a room size, if you ever used this type, you know they are reversible, in fan reverse, the stale air is sucked out from the room space and if there is another window open in the same room, the fresh outside air is pulled in from that window due to the fans airflow direction.

    The guy in the video, I didn't want to attempt his thermal paste job. icon_lol.gif
    I was able to clean the factory heat sink with a small brush and vacuum after and get most of the dust build up out, without having to remove the whole thing off the motherboard. Doing this and the power supply, brought the CPU temp down almost 50C, without new thermal paste

    I would recommend SpeedFan monitoring software (free)

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    Feb 15, 2016 3:25 AM GMT
    I don't do any overclocking. So the OEM CPU fan is fine for me. I use Arctic Silver thermal paste for better thermal transfer as well.
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    Feb 15, 2016 3:35 AM GMT
    xrichx saidI don't do any overclocking. So the OEM CPU fan is fine for me. I use Arctic Silver thermal paste for better thermal transfer as well.



    Did you remove your Intel OEM and re-paste?


    intelfan_full.jpg
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    Feb 15, 2016 3:42 AM GMT

    Dam, hes into it the fans........icon_eek.gif




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    Feb 15, 2016 5:47 PM GMT
    ELNathB said
    xrichx saidI don't do any overclocking. So the OEM CPU fan is fine for me. I use Arctic Silver thermal paste for better thermal transfer as well.



    Did you remove your Intel OEM and re-paste?


    < img src="http://i.cmpnet.com/infoweek/galleries/automated/33/intelfan_full.jpg">

    No, I build my own desktops. I've never removed an existing fan and repasted.
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    Feb 15, 2016 10:23 PM GMT
    xrichx saidI don't do any overclocking. So the OEM CPU fan is fine for me. I use Arctic Silver thermal paste for better thermal transfer as well.

    My current system which I put together in August '15 didn't come with a fan for the cpu (core i7-5820k haswell-e 6-core) which I luckily noticed from its product description so I ordered one. None of the previous systems were as obvious about cranking up the fan's speed when the cpu was busy. I've been playing with Blender 3D and you can really hear it when it starts rendering with the cpu (as opposed to rendering with the video card's gpu).
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    Feb 18, 2016 3:30 PM GMT
    the standard PC tower configuration has been around for a long time. Internal components (example mechanical hard drives) are made to work better faster at a above room temperature.

    for a standard design why worry about it? the CPU will reduce its clock speed if it gets too warm.

    If you feel compelled to remove dust with compressed air dont spray directly on the fan blades. Keep them from turning 90 miles an hour.


    was looking at A fan free quad core mini ITX box:
    http://www.amazon.com/pfSense-Firewall-1-83Ghz-Celeron-Pre-Loaded/dp/B00Y1FW06ME
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    Feb 19, 2016 12:51 AM GMT
    pellaz said


    was looking at A fan free quad core mini ITX box:
    http://www.amazon.com/pfSense-Firewall-1-83Ghz-Celeron-Pre-Loaded/dp/B00Y1FW06ME


    My current PC and the one before it are fanless systems from https://cooltechpc.com/. They probably can't render polygons worth a shit, but I'm not a gamer, so it's not an issue. I love the almost total silence (almost, because I use an external hard drive for data storage.)
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    Feb 19, 2016 1:53 AM GMT
    pellaz saidthe standard PC tower configuration has been around for a long time. Internal components (example mechanical hard drives) are made to work better faster at a above room temperature.

    for a standard design why worry about it? the CPU will reduce its clock speed if it gets too warm.

    If you feel compelled to remove dust with compressed air dont spray directly on the fan blades. Keep them from turning 90 miles an hour.


    was looking at A fan free quad core mini ITX box:
    http://www.amazon.com/pfSense-Firewall-1-83Ghz-Celeron-Pre-Loaded/dp/B00Y1FW06ME



    No, I was getting this BIOS CPU overtemp errors quite often, when rebooting (the power supply fan turns on), it forces you into the BIOS settings and affected the date/time in the BIOS, don't ask me why. There was at least one time it caused "the blue screen of death". There probably was a long time problem with my power supply and or its fan direction. The dust build up around the CPU fan, was more of a complication that added to the overtemp error in the BIOS

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