Poland's homophobia prevalent in public news forums

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2016 8:46 AM GMT
    I was born in Poland where I grew up for most of my childhood and adolscence before immigrating to the United States. I really enjoyed when the Supreme court legalized gay marriage nationwide in the United States. With the exception of fox news lol, on pages like Yahoo and MSN, I found majority of the comments approving, at least half. In Polish equivalent news portal, the positive comments were minority and most were really really homophobic. The comments were so stupid and ridiculous that were saying because of that they lost respect for United States or sky will fall. 12 years after Poland joined European Union, there does not appear to be any significant improvement in acceptance of homosexuality in my native country. The standard of living may have gotten closer to Western Europe, but when it comes to homosexuality we are in the same league as Latvia, Bulgaria or Russia. Some homophobes have even ridiculous counter-campaigns against equality such as "Campaign against Heterophobia".
    Recently Poland elected the right wing party that is very anti-LGHT and anti-EU.
    I am kinda glad I became US Citizen and made the United States my permanent home. I live in California where politics are more progressive.


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    Feb 17, 2016 10:28 AM GMT
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    Feb 17, 2016 7:33 PM GMT
    Attitudes can change relatively quickly, as in 10-15 years. No, I'm not being sarcastic. When you think about it that's not a long time. Anyway, that's my sense of what happened in North America. It will eventually be so common in the rest of Europe that Eastern Europeans will fall into line, starting with younger generations.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Feb 17, 2016 7:54 PM GMT
    You probably have no idea how bad things were here in the U.S. until the 1970s.

    In 1975 I founded Integrity Twin Cities which was the local chapter of the national organization for gay men and women in the Episcopal Church; I lived in Minneapolis at the time. The national director had an article about it printed in the newsletter for the Episcopal Diocese of Minnesota. Following that, four hate-filled letters were printed in the newsletter. One woman wrote that she carried the newsletter between thumb and forefinger to the nearest garbage can! However, in the next newsletter there were five very supportive letters of us which objected to the previous hate-filled letters.

    At one time people claimed that gay people cannot reproduce and therefore they have to recruit. It was claimed that failure to exterminate gay men and women would cause earthquakes, floods, and all manner of disasters as God punished the U.S.

    That doesn't sound too different from the current situation in Poland, does it?
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1765

    Feb 17, 2016 9:43 PM GMT
    That's not too surprising, Poland is following the conservative and nationalistic movement that is surging through Europe. There have been groups of Polish neo-nazis here in Stockholm, Sweden, beating up refugees; so as with all conservative politics, it's not that surprising that other liberal ideals such as rights to homosexuals fall on deaf ears.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Feb 17, 2016 9:54 PM GMT
    YVRguy saidAttitudes can change relatively quickly, as in 10-15 years. No, I'm not being sarcastic. When you think about it that's not a long time. Anyway, that's my sense of what happened in North America. It will eventually be so common in the rest of Europe that Eastern Europeans will fall into line, starting with younger generations.

    You say it gets better but you still hide your face. Will it be finally be safe enough to show your face in another 15 years? Maybe when we're old they'll finally see us and think our sad faces are tolerable.icon_cry.gif
  • Tawrich

    Posts: 62

    Feb 18, 2016 6:59 AM GMT
    HottJoe said
    YVRguy saidAttitudes can change relatively quickly, as in 10-15 years. No, I'm not being sarcastic. When you think about it that's not a long time. Anyway, that's my sense of what happened in North America. It will eventually be so common in the rest of Europe that Eastern Europeans will fall into line, starting with younger generations.

    You say it gets better but you still hide your face. Will it be finally be safe enough to show your face in another 15 years? Maybe when we're old they'll finally see us and think our sad faces are tolerable.icon_cry.gif

    Lol dat burn
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 18, 2016 7:05 AM GMT
    Don't be a tool; whether or not I come out on this forum (of all places) does not change the fact that gays are treated vastly better now in North America than they were 20 years ago. That was the point I was making as you know perfectly well.

    icon_rolleyes.gif
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14297

    Feb 18, 2016 2:18 PM GMT
    Poland is under the strong influence of the highly hypocritical Roman Catholic Church so it is no surprise that modern Polish society is having a very rough time dealing with its homosexual citizens. Hopefully attitudes will start to change for the better but it is going to take a decade or two.
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    Feb 24, 2016 10:17 PM GMT
    Its 2016 and Poland is still under strong influence of Catholic Church as I knew it in 2004 when I emigrated?

    Anyway I heard a lot of bed news recently with development in Poland not just LGBT rights issues.

    For example, last year they elected nationalistic, xenophobic and anti-EU party PiS (Right and Justice Party) . Which also is antigay in its stance.

    They re-introduced "Polish Passport trap". For those who don't know what it is it's very well discussed online. You could be dual citizen having never be born, stepped your foot in Poland and find yourself unable to leave the country without Polish passport or driving/flying over to another Schengen member country.



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    Feb 25, 2016 1:42 AM GMT
    Sam27 said^ I agree! Eastern European countries are very strong connection to their religions (Catholic and Orthodox).


    Its so bad that Polish youth forced to go to church on Sunday morning by their parents, just simply stand at very end with arms crossed or just outside the entrance to church under tree. That's how it's been in small vilages.

    Priests did not like that but did not object strongly to this attitude either since they probably liked the illusion of having more "believers"

  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Feb 26, 2016 12:56 AM GMT
    Wasn't there an uproar about the state nationalizing the media?
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    Feb 27, 2016 12:23 AM GMT
    willowcrow231 said
    Sam27 said^ I agree! Eastern European countries are very strong connection to their religions (Catholic and Orthodox).


    Its so bad that Polish youth forced to go to church on Sunday morning by their parents, just simply stand at very end with arms crossed or just outside the entrance to church under tree. That's how it's been in small vilages.

    Priests did not like that but did not object strongly to this attitude either since they probably liked the illusion of having more "believers"




    Or the priest is smart to know that his dissent will shun kids out of the little faith they have. I have seen most children who hate religious places as kids come around to embrace it in adulthood. The opposite is also true.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2926

    Feb 27, 2016 12:58 AM GMT
    Poland has always been phobic. You can put it down to catholicism or geography-induced paranoia (repeated invasions and folk movement). But you only have to look at Poland's long and flourishing anti-Jewish tradition to feel the country, while beautiful and with a long cultural history, is also pretty violent.
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    Feb 28, 2016 10:06 PM GMT
    tazzari saidPoland has always been phobic. You can put it down to catholicism or geography-induced paranoia (repeated invasions and folk movement). But you only have to look at Poland's long and flourishing anti-Jewish tradition to feel the country, while beautiful and with a long cultural history, is also pretty violent.


    Yes it has history of invasions, Deluge (Swedish), Teutonic Order (Knights of the Cross) to Partitions of Poland and later WW1, WW2 and Soviet occupation.

    Actually Poland has history as a place for Jewish immigration during its Golden Days before it was partitioned. I learned that anti-Semitism was not strong in Poland until it was brought by 18th century invaders and later accelerated by Nazis.

    It also suffered the loss of upper class citizens (read on Katyn) since the last thing Soviets wanted were influential enlightened citizens who had access to capital and resources to fight them.
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    Mar 01, 2016 9:24 AM GMT

    In the United States is the same problem, some kids were forced to go to church on Sunday morning.

    My parents were raised in Orthodox Christian school, my grandparents were forced them everyday go to Church in Palestine. So you guys should be lucky only Sunday. That is nothing.


    Well we also had mandatory religion in class 2 or 3 times a week. Some were absurd. We had priest speaking against Harry Potter or Pokemon.
    Perhaps he was against Harry Potter due to witchcraft story but Pokemon? Did Pikachu electroshocked him?

    Did he even know parents read at bedtime story to children about Hansel and Gretel or Fox killing rooster. He probably lived under rock.
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    Mar 01, 2016 1:18 PM GMT
    Sam27 said
    willowcrow231 said
    Sam27 said^ I agree! Eastern European countries are very strong connection to their religions (Catholic and Orthodox).


    Its so bad that Polish youth forced to go to church on Sunday morning by their parents, just simply stand at very end with arms crossed or just outside the entrance to church under tree. That's how it's been in small vilages.

    Priests did not like that but did not object strongly to this attitude either since they probably liked the illusion of having more "believers"



    In the United States is the same problem, some kids were forced to go to church on Sunday morning.

    My parents were raised in Orthodox Christian school, my grandparents were forced them everyday go to Church in Palestine. So you guys should be lucky only Sunday. That is nothing.
    I was raised Church Of Christ, forced to go to church every Sunday morning, Sunday night, Wednesday night, and every church function. My mom was the church secretary (retired now), and my dad was an Elder.

    And people wonder why I'm a fucking atheist.