Zsa Zsa Gabor’s Lung Surgery Postponed As Family Prepares For Her Death

  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    Feb 19, 2016 7:20 AM GMT
    Zsa Zsa Gabor’s Lung Surgery Postponed As Family Prepares For Her Death

    http://radaronline.com/celebrity-news/zsa-zsa-gabor-death-surgery-postponed/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 19, 2016 7:27 AM GMT


    I have to give this lady a lot of credit, she's been hanging in there for several years, with some horrific medical issues. Tenacious is an understatement, I wish her and her family well, hope she makes it to 100
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 19, 2016 7:39 AM GMT


    Awww, she reminds me of my granny Emma, who died at 95


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-3453827/Zsa-Zsa-Gabor-s-husbandFr-d-ric-Prinz-von-Anhalt-insists-hospitalized-99-year-old-determined-reach-100th-birthday.html


    0CA744D400000578-0-image-a-3_14558401886

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 19, 2016 7:48 AM GMT
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Feb 19, 2016 4:06 PM GMT
    she is a wonderfull DIVA
  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    Feb 19, 2016 4:12 PM GMT
  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    Feb 19, 2016 4:16 PM GMT
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 19, 2016 11:18 PM GMT
    Always loved her accent.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 20, 2016 1:09 AM GMT
    An incredible beauty in her day.May Christ have mercy on her.I hope her passing is peaceful.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 20, 2016 3:47 AM GMT
    I didn't know she was even still alive. What a fighter.

    These are tough decisions to make. A "semi-vegetative state" doesn't sound like something you'd want to have prolonged. And at 99? It may indeed be time to throw in the proverbial towel, poor lady.

    I sorta faced this with my Father, though younger at 85. I came down here to Florida to be with him after his first heart attack. I already knew he had terminal cancer, the only question was whether his heart or the cancer would kill him first. But the doctors didn't want him told, a practice not often followed today. And caused me to panic when I contracted cancer myself 5 years ago, not sure if I could trust what I was being told.

    But he was as alert & sharp as ever, still able to walk, and he wanted to live. When he had 4 more heart attacks over the next weeks, right in front of me, I did what I could to keep him alive. At one point even giving him CPR.

    Do you have any idea what it's like to give your own father CPR? To try to keep him from dying in front of you, while the ambulance is coming? One of the most traumatizing events in my life, or I wouldn't still be talking about it.

    And when I got my Dad to the hospital in the ambulance, the doctor actually said to me one time: "Why do you keep bringing him in here? Just let him die. He'll be dead in a few weeks no matter what we do."

    I wanted to punch him out. Did he really think I could stand by doing nothing, and watch my Father die? When Dad still wanted to live? Even just one more day of life was a gift, that I knew he wanted. He finally did die of a 6th heart attack at night in his sleep, which I didn't hear, even though I had a bedroom next to his.

    So I can understand the dilemma Zsa Zsa's husband and family feel. With the added issue that she's reported as being semi-vegetative, that my Dad wasn't. What would YOU do in that case, if you had to make a decision?
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Feb 20, 2016 5:11 PM GMT
    metta saidZsa Zsa Gabor’s Lung Surgery Postponed As Family Prepares For Her Death

    http://radaronline.com/celebrity-news/zsa-zsa-gabor-death-surgery-postponed/


    She is STILL living???
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Feb 20, 2016 5:24 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said...when I got my Dad to the hospital in the ambulance, the doctor actually said to me one time: "Why do you keep bringing him in here? Just let him die. He'll be dead in a few weeks no matter what we do."

    I wanted to punch him out. Did he really think I could stand by doing nothing, and watch my Father die? When Dad still wanted to live? Even just one more day of life was a gift, that I knew he wanted. He finally did die of a 6th heart attack at night in his sleep, which I didn't hear, even though I had a bedroom next to his.

    So I can understand the dilemma Zsa Zsa's husband and family feel. With the added issue that she's reported as being semi-vegetative, that my Dad wasn't. What would YOU do in that case, if you had to make a decision?


    Perhaps there will come a moment when you will look back on how you handled things with your father--and see it all differently.

    A body that was broken and full of disease...essentially a pain-filled prison of suffering holding what was vital captive. WHY do humans so adamantly see maintaining THAT as "living"? I see a massive heart attack...a major stroke as the body in the act of loosening the bonds. If other humans, thinking to "save a life" did not interfere, that which is vital in the body would be free--which, perhaps, is what happened during the night when you were not available to stop it.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Feb 21, 2016 12:53 AM GMT
    FitBlackCuddler said
    Art_Deco said...when I got my Dad to the hospital in the ambulance, the doctor actually said to me one time: "Why do you keep bringing him in here? Just let him die. He'll be dead in a few weeks no matter what we do."

    I wanted to punch him out. Did he really think I could stand by doing nothing, and watch my Father die? When Dad still wanted to live? Even just one more day of life was a gift, that I knew he wanted. He finally did die of a 6th heart attack at night in his sleep, which I didn't hear, even though I had a bedroom next to his.

    So I can understand the dilemma Zsa Zsa's husband and family feel. With the added issue that she's reported as being semi-vegetative, that my Dad wasn't. What would YOU do in that case, if you had to make a decision?


    Perhaps there will come a moment when you will look back on how you handled things with your father--and see it all differently.

    A body that was broken and full of disease...essentially a pain-filled prison of suffering holding what was vital captive. WHY do humans so adamantly see maintaining THAT as "living"? I see a massive heart attack...a major stroke as the body in the act of loosening the bonds. If other humans, thinking to "save a life" did not interfere, that which is vital in the body would be free--which, perhaps, is what happened during the night when you were not available to stop it.


    I see it about the way you do. I have a living will which specifies that I am not to be resuscitated if there is little hope for recovery. I certainly would not want to be kept alive by artificial means if life had become completely devoid of quality and had become a burden.

    My mother's oldest sister made it almost to 101. Once, when her heart stopped they resuscitated her which made her very angry. She pointed out that she was already past 100 and obviously didn't have much longer to live anyway so they should have let her go. The next time they did as she wished.

    A male cousin died on his 99th birthday in a hospital. The night before his son had said to him, "I'll see you tomorrow.". The reply was, "No you won't.". His son thinks that he chose when to die; perhaps he did.

    My mother died a few months before her 96 birthday. She had been declining fast so my brother, sister, and I rushed from various cities to be with her. As she became weaker she removed her oxygen cannula; it was obvious that she knew exactly what she was doing even though she was not talking. She died peacefully and quietly in our arms. We were fortunate to be with her as she died. That's the way to go! No drama, no hysterics, no emergency procedures, just a perfectly natural death and accepting it as a natural part of life.

    It's unfortunate that some people hang onto every minute of life they can even when it is obvious that they have little time left; I think that the real problem is fear of death rather than the desire to live. It's also unfortunate that some people are forced to keep living, by extraordinary measures, when they clearly don't want to. And the extreme amount of resources used to keep terminal people alive as long as possible could be better utilized to help people who could actually benefit from more medical care.

    I am reminded of a line in "Ole man river" from the broadway musical "Showboat". It's, "I'm tired of living and scared of dying.". Here is a link to it, sung by the well-known black singer and actor, Paul Robeson:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyJtGNk9iEU
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 21, 2016 1:15 AM GMT
    Its ashame that Zsa Zsa's husband is parading her around with no makeup. Zsa Zsa was always concerned about looking just right and it disrespects her way of life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 21, 2016 3:38 AM GMT
    FitBlackCuddler said
    Perhaps there will come a moment when you will look back on how you handled things with your father--and see it all differently.

    A body that was broken and full of disease...essentially a pain-filled prison of suffering holding what was vital captive. WHY do humans so adamantly see maintaining THAT as "living"? I see a massive heart attack...a major stroke as the body in the act of loosening the bonds. If other humans, thinking to "save a life" did not interfere, that which is vital in the body would be free--which, perhaps, is what happened during the night when you were not available to stop it.

    FRE0 said
    I am reminded of a line in "Ole man river" from the broadway musical "Showboat". It's, "I'm tired of living and scared of dying."

    These are valid points to consider, guys. Which I did, because I knew my Dad. He did have a "No Heroic Acts" written provision, that I didn't violate.

    But that was intended if he had gone into a vegetative or comatose state, and/or had to be kept on life support. He was fully conscious with each of his heart attacks, apparently even his 6th & final, when the evidence suggests he tried to make it to my bedroom for help, before he collapsed and died on the floor, about 4 AM, unheard by me.

    No, Dad wanted to live. And he wasn't in a lot of pain. And **I** wanted him to live. Those last 6 weeks I had with him were our best ever, for both of us. We had never been so close together. Cooked for him, contracted with a private meal delivery service, went to restaurants with him that he always loved, right up until the day he died. Also took him to bars, especially the club the local American Legion Post ran, where he usually had a beer with his WWII buddies and swapped old stories or discussed the news.

    But I never drank in front of him once in my entire life, nor my Mother for that matter, who'd already died 4 years earlier. I'd have Cokes. Funny, right? I was always a kid again with them. And he'd introduce me all around the Legion hall, as "my son the Colonel".

    That would be difficult for me, to hold back my tears in front of his friends, because he had never expressed any real pride in me my whole life. Except, nearly 30 years earlier, when he'd dropped me off at the Army induction center after I enlisted as a Private. He stood on the sidewalk before I went inside and shook my hand, wished me luck. First time he'd ever done that in my life. And then he hardly ever discussed my military career with me again.

    But my Dad wasn't like the photos here of Zsa Zsa. Weakened and thinner, yes, but not in pain, despite the cancer. His only real pain was when he had the heart attacks, which were slow and actually hard to diagnose as something less serious, no more than indigestion.

    Only once did he start to fade away on me, and I could see his panic. And during those other times I wanted to relieve his pain & distress, and called 911. Each time he thanked me afterwards. And said once after returning from the hospital: "Bob, I overheard you on the phone with 911. Thank you very much. You were so calm and professional, not panicked, and knew exactly what to say. Where did you learn to do that?"

    "Well, Dad, I was in the Army for 25 years and a Colonel, after all. You sorta pick that stuff up." Another one of our moments when I had to make an excuse to step away briefly and cry quietly in the hallway outside his room. Yeah, some brave Colonel I was.

    I'm glad I handled his final days as I did, and I truly believe he was glad, too. We had good times and memories together those last weeks, things he would have been denied if he'd died sooner while I just stayed retired back in Seattle. I loved my Father, and this was my last gift to him.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 21, 2016 6:23 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said<

    ... Another one of our moments when I had to make an excuse to step away briefly and cry quietly in the hallway outside his room. Yeah, some brave Colonel I was.

    ...I loved my Father, and this was my last gift to him.


    I couldn't cry in front of my Mother, either. I don't know why. Maybe trying to pretend that things will get better? Maybe trying to let her know that I will carry on? Or maybe just wanting to not have her feel any worse than she already did.

    Strange sort of denial. I saved my tears for when I was not in her vicinity. And I cried like a/n SOB.

    When she was removed from the hospital to be taken to hospice, I waited until she was just out of range and then fell into the arms of a new friend of hers--the cleaning lady--and I cried my eyes out in her arms. And, bless her heart, she understood completely. I was so thankful to her. I don't even remember her name.