'After I Lived in Norway, America Felt Backward. Here’s Why. A crash course in social democracy.'

  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Feb 25, 2016 5:58 AM GMT
     After I Lived in Norway, America Felt Backward. Here’s Why.
    A crash course in social democracy.


    http://www.thenation.com/article/after-i-lived-in-norway-america-felt-backward-heres-why/
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Feb 25, 2016 9:03 PM GMT
    Sounds glorious!
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Feb 26, 2016 2:03 AM GMT
    ^
    sounds like you were in a tourist area. Go to Disneyland and you can probably spend a lot there. And then there is the exchange rate to consider as well.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Feb 26, 2016 3:24 AM GMT
    Norway is preparing to close it's borders to the now completely fucked-up nation of Sweden due to the "refugees" and the probable total collapse of the EU.

    At least Norway is keeping it's integrity
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    Feb 26, 2016 1:14 PM GMT
    Thanks for the contributions.
    https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100426210744AAV6zlE
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    Feb 26, 2016 2:59 PM GMT
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    http://www.heritage.org/index/about
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    Feb 26, 2016 3:21 PM GMT
    metta said After I Lived in Norway, America Felt Backward. Here’s Why.
    A crash course in social democracy.


    http://www.thenation.com/article/after-i-lived-in-norway-america-felt-backward-heres-why/


    The 2009 United Nations Human Development report claims that Norwegians enjoy the highest life expectancy, literacy and income potential in the world. That apparently doesn’t mean they’re happy.

    Depression and anxiety are the new folkesykdom , or national illnesses, say researchers at the state public health institute Folkehelseinstituttet . In a report issued this week, the institute claims that mental health problems are also costing society dearly because they can crop up early in life, often lead to long-term sick leave and expensive treatment programs. Patients also can suffer relapses, because of the chronic nature of their illness.

    The study notes how alarmingly common diagnoses of depression and anxiety ( angst ) have become in Norway: They are the main cause of around a third of all sick leaves, affecting at least 100,000 persons at any given time.
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    Feb 26, 2016 3:23 PM GMT
    metta said^
    sounds like you were in a tourist area. Go to Disneyland and you can probably spend a lot there. And then there is the exchange rate to consider as well.


    But then again you are in Disneyland. Anaheim is closer.

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    Feb 26, 2016 3:45 PM GMT
    Lol Liberals: The Norwegian economy, once one of Europe's brightest, ground to a halt in late 2015, leaving full-year growth at its lowest in six years and consumer confidence at its lowest in 24 years.

    As western Europe's top oil and gas producer, Norway has been hit by the 70 percent fall in crude prices since mid-2014. Unemployment has reached a 10-year high of 4.6 percent, low by global standards but far above the 3.2 percent seen in mid-2014.

    US Liberals: you really want to pay a 39% personal income rate like they do in Norway?
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    Feb 26, 2016 3:57 PM GMT
    Excellent article; it was deja vu for me all over again. The "culture" in the united states (if you can call it that) is more like a condition, or an ailment brought on by centuries of state-sponsored genocide, death, and mayhem.

    The u.s really is one of the most violent, criminal, terrorist organizations whose ideology is based on skin tone/color rather than religious beliefs; a place where owning a gun is nearly a necessity. It's a terrorist organization that has thrived through extreme violence, genocidal exploitation and a complete lack of morality and an embracing of outright apathy.

    Greatest country in the world? Get the fuck outta here. Save that shit for some motherfucker that doesn't know anything and hasn't been anywhere.
  • dumbbell

    Posts: 32

    Feb 26, 2016 5:49 PM GMT
    An excellent article that presents a pretty accurate picture, in my opinion. There may be a couple of factors that figure into the success of the nordic model that the article doesn't go into.

    A) The nordic peoples believe first and foremost in maximizing the quality of THIS life, and would not buy into a belief system whereby the reward (or punishment) comes in the NEXT one. This doesn't mean they have no religion -- rather, their religion is folk-based rather than bible-based or koran-based.

    B) The above is facilitated by the overwhelmingly homogeneous constitution of the nordic peoples -- it's not a mosaic or a melting-pot or a collage or any of that bullshit; pretty much everyone is on the same team, of similar stock, pulling in the same direction -- you don't have countervailing forces at play. And the lack of "diversity" hasn't hurt them at all -- on the contrary.

    Recently, Sweden has gone in the direction of fucking up their nordic success by trying to solve the fake problem of "insufficient diversity". But it won't be long before they admit their error and correct course to realign with Norway and Denmark. (Sweden can't continue to be Sweden if it's largely populated by Eritreans.)

    C) Norway doesn't give a fuck what everybody else is doing -- they know they have it right.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14345

    Feb 26, 2016 7:17 PM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    metta said After I Lived in Norway, America Felt Backward. Here’s Why.
    A crash course in social democracy.


    http://www.thenation.com/article/after-i-lived-in-norway-america-felt-backward-heres-why/


    The 2009 United Nations Human Development report claims that Norwegians enjoy the highest life expectancy, literacy and income potential in the world. That apparently doesn’t mean they’re happy.

    Depression and anxiety are the new folkesykdom , or national illnesses, say researchers at the state public health institute Folkehelseinstituttet . In a report issued this week, the institute claims that mental health problems are also costing society dearly because they can crop up early in life, often lead to long-term sick leave and expensive treatment programs. Patients also can suffer relapses, because of the chronic nature of their illness.

    The study notes how alarmingly common diagnoses of depression and anxiety ( angst ) have become in Norway: They are the main cause of around a third of all sick leaves, affecting at least 100,000 persons at any given time.
    Isnt that depression caused by their mostly chilly, cloudy climateicon_question.gif
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Feb 26, 2016 8:39 PM GMT
    ^
    You can say the same thing about almost any world-class city: San Francisco, New York, etc.
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    Feb 27, 2016 4:05 AM GMT
    Norway:
    These are five major taxes that apply to the average citizen of Norway

    Income tax is charged at a flat rate of 28% on net income.

    Value Added Tax (or VAT) is charged on the sale of most goods and services in the country.

    Norwegians must pay an annual "wealth tax" on their net "worldwide assets". There is an exemption (up to the equivalent of $78,483 USD), with any amount over that being subjected to a 1.1% "wealth tax".

    Norwegian municipalities can choose to impose a property tax of between 0.2-0.7% on the total "fiscal value of the property". Not all Norwegian municipalities choose to levy this tax.

    Children, foster children and parents of the deceased pay a progressive rate for an inheritance or death tax. Here are the USD equivalents:

    Compare this to the ridiculous western systems of taxation. Their money goes through one set of hands not the ten it does in North America.

    source KPMG.
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    Feb 27, 2016 4:21 AM GMT
    PrinceSam saidI never find a 1 pair of jean (Levis 501) $94.00 in New York City or San Francisco.

    Maybe in Scottsdale? lol


    or Amazon.

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    Feb 27, 2016 4:23 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    desertmuscl said
    metta said After I Lived in Norway, America Felt Backward. Here’s Why.
    A crash course in social democracy.


    http://www.thenation.com/article/after-i-lived-in-norway-america-felt-backward-heres-why/


    The 2009 United Nations Human Development report claims that Norwegians enjoy the highest life expectancy, literacy and income potential in the world. That apparently doesn’t mean they’re happy.

    Depression and anxiety are the new folkesykdom , or national illnesses, say researchers at the state public health institute Folkehelseinstituttet . In a report issued this week, the institute claims that mental health problems are also costing society dearly because they can crop up early in life, often lead to long-term sick leave and expensive treatment programs. Patients also can suffer relapses, because of the chronic nature of their illness.

    The study notes how alarmingly common diagnoses of depression and anxiety ( angst ) have become in Norway: They are the main cause of around a third of all sick leaves, affecting at least 100,000 persons at any given time.
    Isnt that depression caused by their mostly chilly, cloudy climateicon_question.gif

    Yes basically correct. There are a lot of Scandinavians in high-taxed Minnesota too where the weather totally sucks most of the time. Must be a form of masochism.



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2016 4:27 AM GMT
    The real estate taxes in NJ are so low?
    not
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    Feb 28, 2016 6:32 AM GMT
    I'll admit that Norway was great until oil took a hit. When one-fifth of your economic output falls in value by 70%, well it better not last for long otherwise you in big trouble, not difficult math to do...hint: 1/7th of your economy has disappeared. However, they have $800 Billion in reserves to make that $50 billion annual shortfall up, just don't make it a habit or you can bet your citizens will be asked to pay a hefty portion of it in the future. Revisit the country in 10 years if oil stays low, tell me how it's going.
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    Feb 28, 2016 8:08 PM GMT
    Norway is a constitutional monarchy, originally adopted in 1814. It will be around in 100 years because it has a sound tax, capital generating economy.
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    Feb 28, 2016 8:38 PM GMT


    "It’s not perfect, of course. It has always been a carefully considered work in progress. Governance by consensus takes time and effort. You might think of it as slow democracy. Even so, it’s light-years ahead of us"


    You have to wonder, who exactly "wants" to migrate to the US, we have such a bad reputation around the globe.

    Is it because, "you can buy stuff" here, more lies about the "American dream"? Other globalist that are anti socialists/pro capitalists? That is who wants to move here?

    Here is the George Carlin clip, the man was knowledgeable beyond his years, I am sure some here would call this man, "anti American or a socialist", he was just telling the truth when no one was listening icon_rolleyes.gif







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    Feb 29, 2016 2:38 AM GMT
    sunjbill saidI'll admit that Norway was great until oil took a hit. When one-fifth of your economic output falls in value by 70%, well it better not last for long otherwise you in big trouble, not difficult math to do...hint: 1/7th of your economy has disappeared. However, they have $800 Billion in reserves to make that $50 billion annual shortfall up, just don't make it a habit or you can bet your citizens will be asked to pay a hefty portion of it in the future. Revisit the country in 10 years if oil stays low, tell me how it's going.


    Sort of puts a dent in things huh?