The tech gentrification of San Francisco

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Feb 25, 2016 10:27 AM GMT
    A good docu but I feel a little disturbed

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    Feb 25, 2016 4:09 PM GMT
    thanks for the link.

    to some small tiny extent you see this happening in Denver. Denver as a city is land locked by other suburban cities. There are no physical boundaries tho. I mean the poor peeps can live in suburban Aurora. While San Francisco and NYC's situation is aggravated by limited space. There is just no more land to develop.

    a while back there was a realJock post to rent or own. Just think on how little you could buy a small duplex in San Francisco back in 2009 and how much it would be worth now? Maybe one should have bought a few units. Are you better off renting not owning only in say Kentucky? Are you the fool for even living there?

    i got a laugh:
    where does this put less affirming places like Kentucky. Bet the tech companies are thanking Kim Davis and her rock solid $90,000 yearly salary for telling them to keep away.

    there was a realJock post on how every small insignificant job requires a college education. Well the real bad is how can anyone afford said education.

    Technology is kinda flighty. Yes you have a software engineering degree but how long can you make it run for you? Most software practices and basic knowledge is not portable to the next job after 5 years. Lots of stress to learn the next thing.





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    Feb 25, 2016 7:52 PM GMT
    pellaz saidMost software practices and basic knowledge is not portable to the next job after 5 years. Lots of stress to learn the next thing.

    I had a coworker who would conflate the two sayings "this isn't rocket science" and "this isn't brain surgery" to "this isn't rocket surgery" when talking about what we did (web software developers). But he was wrong, it really is "rocket surgery" and that's why good programmers are highly paid; there's a lot to know and you have to work hard to keep up.
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    Feb 27, 2016 4:38 AM GMT
    pellaz saidthanks for the link.

    to some small tiny extent you see this happening in Denver. Denver as a city is land locked by other suburban cities. There are no physical boundaries tho. I mean the poor peeps can live in suburban Aurora. While San Francisco and NYC's situation is aggravated by limited space. There is just no more land to develop.

    a while back there was a realJock post to rent or own. Just think on how little you could buy a small duplex in San Francisco back in 2009 and how much it would be worth now? Maybe one should have bought a few units. Are you better off renting not owning only in say Kentucky? Are you the fool for even living there?

    i got a laugh:
    where does this put less affirming places like Kentucky. Bet the tech companies are thanking Kim Davis and her rock solid $90,000 yearly salary for telling them to keep away.

    there was a realJock post on how every small insignificant job requires a college education. Well the real bad is how can anyone afford said education.

    Technology is kinda flighty. Yes you have a software engineering degree but how long can you make it run for you? Most software practices and basic knowledge is not portable to the next job after 5 years. Lots of stress to learn the next thing.


    huh? "Most software practices and basic knowledge is not portable"

    The basics haven't really changed... ever:

    The von Neumann architecture, also known as the von Neumann model and Princeton architecture, is a computer architecture based on that described in 1945 by the mathematician and physicist John von Neumann and others in the First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC.

    Anything after this is just some detailed refinement....


  • metta

    Posts: 39130

    Feb 27, 2016 5:30 AM GMT
    Fuller House in the Real San Francisco


    https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish/videos/689864844488359/
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    Feb 27, 2016 6:57 AM GMT
    Horrible, at least now this is a well known problem here on the west coast, at least within the internet communities, sadly though, mainstream media continues to ignore this festering bee hive. Maybe another bubble bust?

    CA government could put a stop to it but when you remove the shit, the flies go somewhere else. icon_evil.gif

    Google stock today is trading in record territory @ 766.00 per share in Dec 2015, think about that for a minute icon_eek.gif
    Those who bought Google stock in 2006 @ 200.00 per share, your original investment of even $1,000 (5 shares) are now worth about $4,000, 10 years later.



    Dot-com bubble
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dot-com_bubble

    The dot-com bubble (also referred to as the dot-com boom, the Internet bubble, the dot-com collapse, and the information technology bubble)[1] was a historic speculative bubble covering roughly 1997–2000 (with a climax on March 10, 2000, with the NASDAQ peaking at 5,132.52[2] in intraday trading before closing at 5,048.62) during which stock markets in industrialized nations saw their equity value rise rapidly from growth in the Internet sector and related fields. While the latter part was a boom and bust cycle, the Internet boom is sometimes meant to refer to the steady commercial growth of the Internet with the advent of the World Wide Web, as exemplified by the first release of the Mosaic web browser in 1993, and continuing through the 1990s.

    The period was marked by the founding (and, in many cases, spectacular failure) of several new Internet-based companies commonly referred to as dot-coms. Companies could cause their stock prices to increase by simply adding an "e-" prefix to their name or a ".com" to the end, which one author called "prefix investing."[3]

    A combination of rapidly increasing stock prices, market confidence that the companies would turn future profits, individual speculation in stocks, and widely available venture capital created an environment in which many investors were willing to overlook traditional metrics, such as P/E ratio, in favor of basing confidence on technological advancements.

    The collapse of the bubble took place during 1999–2001. Some companies, such as pets.com and Webvan failed completely. Others lost a large portion of their market capitalization but remained stable and profitable, e.g., Cisco, whose stock declined by 86%. Some later recovered and surpassed their dot-com-bubble peaks, e.g., eBay.com, and Amazon.com whose stock went from 107 to 7 dollars per share, but a decade later exceeded 500

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    Feb 27, 2016 9:41 AM GMT
    Great documentary! Thanks for sharing. Vancouver, BC is very much going through this, but not at the same scale and speed as SF.
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    Feb 27, 2016 8:46 PM GMT
    Growing up, my dad worked at a tech firm a mile away and was always home at 5:15 to have dinner with the whole family. My director went home at 5PM yesterday because his wife was freaking out about their 4 year old running a temp. Usually he works 10am to 8PM to avoid traffic.

    If your product is hardware, all the real talent and resources is in California, which explains why Microsoft MountainView created the XBox and mice and keyboards are designed in Redmond. TSMC for wafer fabrication has a huge office here, your packaging firms like KLA Tencore is nearby for chip packaging. Other part manufacturers are nearby, if not across the street from Analog Devices or Broadcom. We visit our customers face to face at any time without arranging a flight.


    I visited vendors in Vancouver BC who were angry over the glut of Asians buying up every piece of property available to the point their kids were going to have to live elsewhere or live with mum and dad till they're 40. Similar situation in San Diego during the cellphone boon (which is now arguably a bust.)

    Seattle growth is driven by it isn't San Francisco. But, the real talent wasn't there. Seattle companies there love, love, love contractors. The only people making money on that transaction are the contractor firms. There's a glut of engineering talent pushing wages down (H-1B?)

    Employees hope their spouses/partners find a job as easily as they can. Its just easier in the Bay area. The Bay Area situation is driven by companies who save tons of time by being surrounded by best-in-class talent.


    I live in San Jose now. I could buy a car with my relocation bonus if the IRS didn't take half of it. They interviewed dozens of people and chose me. I'm intimidated by that. To stay focused, I'm surrounded by free food, free dry cleaning, and they detail my car in the parking lot, twice a month.


    Did I displace any culture? I think this area was fruit trees a decade ago.

    I've been to San Francisco a time or two. Not the gay paradise I thought it was. SOMA ends up being the poster child against marijuana legalization. In fact, I'd say LA had a better gay community than SF. More free time?

    Its unfortunate I can't find a good job there.
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    Feb 28, 2016 3:44 AM GMT
    Kinda funny. I was looking at real estate in Oakland, and prices are already on a rapid rise. If you want a surefire investment opportunity, buy a crack house in Richmond and sit on it. In about 4 years, it will probably be worth a $1 million. icon_lol.gif