Any kosher guys on RealJock?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2016 3:33 AM GMT
    I'm Jewish and keep kosher. Would love to meet guys with similar interests.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2016 3:44 AM GMT
    No way. I love my cheeseburgers! icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2016 3:49 AM GMT
    Yeah, I love my meat with cheese too!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2016 3:54 AM GMT
    xrichx saidNo way. I love my cheeseburgers! icon_lol.gif

    Don't forget the bacon.   icon_lol.gif
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    Mar 02, 2016 3:57 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    xrichx saidNo way. I love my cheeseburgers! icon_lol.gif

    Don't forget the bacon.   icon_lol.gif

    YES!!! icon_lol.gif
  • mystery905

    Posts: 745

    Mar 02, 2016 5:42 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidYeah, I love my meat with cheese too!


    LOL that was really a great response (or am I giving you too much credit?) icon_lol.gif
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Mar 02, 2016 8:32 AM GMT
    I have Kosher meals when I take a flight. That's the only way I can have meat without dairy.
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    Mar 02, 2016 10:21 AM GMT
    Thanks, guys. Appreciate the respect.
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    Mar 02, 2016 10:38 AM GMT
    I have never had Kosher food before (that makes me more curious to try). Honesty, real jock should allow others to each profiles based on lifestyle (including diet).
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    Mar 02, 2016 11:18 AM GMT
    DavidB1967 saidI'm Jewish and keep kosher. Would love to meet guys with similar interests.


    Jewish and lacto-ovo-pesco-vegetarian and the pesco only includes fish with fins and scales --- but I don't care where the dishes have been.... (So, close enough for you?)
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    Mar 02, 2016 2:17 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidYeah, I love my meat with cheese too!

    Are you saying eating kosher limits me to cut cocks?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2016 5:55 PM GMT
    ^If you're an observant Jew. A cut cock is a sign of the Lords covenant with his Chosen People.
  • IgnatiusReill...

    Posts: 159

    Mar 03, 2016 3:16 PM GMT
    DavidB1967 saidI'm Jewish and keep kosher. Would love to meet guys with similar interests.


    I appreciate men and women who stay in touch with their spiritual roots. I hope you find your soulmate.
  • browardmuscle

    Posts: 2

    Mar 03, 2016 9:07 PM GMT
    Keeping kosher is alot of work, but helps to promote a relationship between you and G-d.
  • Wendigo9

    Posts: 426

    Mar 03, 2016 10:05 PM GMT
    If you mean 100% real, then consider me the rare kind.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2016 1:44 AM GMT
    ricky1987 saidI have never had Kosher food before (that makes me more curious to try). Honesty, real jock should allow others to each profiles based on lifestyle (including diet).

    Kosher food isn't really a cuisine. It's pretty similar to halal in regards to types of animals/meats you can eat and how it's prepared.

    So a few oversimplified examples of Kosher is you can't eat meats with dairy, can't eat pork, seafood must have scales (so no squid or tentacle things). icon_lol.gif
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3534

    Mar 04, 2016 4:24 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidYeah, I love my meat with cheese too!



    lol. no.
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    Mar 04, 2016 5:34 AM GMT
    DavidB1967 saidThanks, guys. Appreciate the respect.


    Respect has to be earned.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3386

    Mar 04, 2016 1:55 PM GMT
    Jewish/Israeli, but I don't keep Kosher.
    Not having grown up on them, I don't eat things like bacon, though.

    Safer For Your Soul, But Is Kosher Healthier, Too?
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129649433

    || Kosher rules help shoppers with food allergies, too. If you’re lactose intolerant, anything marked "pareve" is for you. That means there's no trace of meat or dairy. If there's a capital D on the package, it's a dairy product that has never been near meat. Many "Kosher-for-Passover" foods are made without wheat — perfect for those who need to avoid gluten.

    || Sales of certified kosher foods skyrocketed 64 percent between 2003 and 2008.

    || And it's gone far beyond borscht and matzo. Coke, Heinz ketchup, Cap'n Crunch, Budweiser — all kosher. One of the biggest moments in the koshering of America came in 1997 when the Oreo — originally made with lard — became kosher.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3386

    Mar 04, 2016 1:56 PM GMT
    More People Choosing Kosher for Health
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/13/more-people-choosing-kosher-for-health

    || According to the market research survey, 62 percent of people who buy kosher foods do so for quality reasons, while 51 percent say they buy kosher for its “general healthfulness.” About one-third say they buy kosher because they think food safety standards are better than with traditional supermarket foods. Only 15 percent of respondents say they buy kosher food because of religious rules.

    || But the strict rules for producing and certifying kosher food products may result in closer scrutiny of food safety issues. For instance, independent organizations such as the Orthodox Union are paid by food companies to send trained personnel to factories to ensure that all of the restrictions of kosher laws are met. The extra monitoring typically means that kosher products are produced more slowly than other foods.

    || In general, kosher food has to be carefully watched throughout its processing and preparation. Grains, packaged vegetables, fruits and similar products are thoroughly inspected for any trace of non-kosher substances like insects*.

    || “The extra eyes and slower speeds probably allow the government inspectors to do a better job,” Dr. Regenstein said. “The fact that a kosher company is meeting a lot of rules and subjected to random inspections is something of real value. Although most consumers don’t really understand it in that detail.”

    || Certifying a meat as kosher is even more complicated. First, only certain animals are allowed to be eaten: no pigs, rodents or birds of prey, for example. Additionally, every cow, chicken or other animal that is certified as kosher has to be killed and butchered in a particular way.

    || During this process, called “shechting,” each animal is killed quickly by a trained individual. Some believe this form of butchering is more humane and less painful than traditional slaughterhouse practices. Every butchered animal is closely inspected for signs of disease, and any animal that may have been sick is not used.

    || because all kosher meats are thoroughly salted, they may be less likely to carry E. coli and salmonella, experts say, though no studies have been done to confirm this speculation.

    || A kosher symbol on a food can also be particularly helpful for those with strict dietary requirements or allergies to a certain food. Kosher foods are a good option for consumers with allergies to shellfish, for example. A vegetarian can buy a kosher product labeled “pareve” and be certain that it contains no trace of milk or meat. Muslims and Seventh Day Adventists, who also follow strict diets, also are regular buyers of kosher foods.

    || Ultimately, the best part of buying kosher products is that it may help you know what is — and more importantly, what’s not — in your food.

    * Locust, incidentally, unlike other insects, IS Kosher.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2016 2:18 PM GMT
    xrichx said
    ricky1987 saidI have never had Kosher food before (that makes me more curious to try). Honesty, real jock should allow others to each profiles based on lifestyle (including diet).

    Kosher food isn't really a cuisine. It's pretty similar to halal in regards to types of animals/meats you can eat and how it's prepared.

    So a few oversimplified examples of Kosher is you can't eat meats with dairy, can't eat pork, seafood must have scales (so no squid or tentacle things). icon_lol.gif


    I know what Kosher food is. I wasn't talking about cuisine, Though all Yiddish cuisine for instance is Kosher. I was saying that I have never had Kosher food (at least not knowingly).
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Mar 05, 2016 12:01 AM GMT
    OP, not kosher here but I am highly interested in food and food customs.

    I understand that eating away from the home can be a real obstacle course for kosher folks. How do you deal with it?

  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Mar 05, 2016 12:04 AM GMT
    My husband and I do "kosher lite" at our house, meaning we do not cook/eat red meat at home nor do we cook or eat any treif at home or elsewhere (unless we've been invited somewhere where the hosts didn't ask about our dietary preferences and there's something that can't be avoided, like a main course with pancetta in it or something like that).

    My husband is Reconstructionist and had a rabbi that taught that, since the Torah says not to boil a kid in its mother's milk, and since poultry do not produce milk, and since Rashi apparently said that the interpretation of the word "kid" couldn't include birds, we'll sometimes eat poultry with dairy.

    Shabbat shalom!
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Mar 05, 2016 12:11 AM GMT
    ricky1987 said
    I know what Kosher food is. I wasn't talking about cuisine, Though all Yiddish cuisine for instance is Kosher. I was saying that I have never had Kosher food (at least not knowingly).


    One would typically say Ashkenazic cuisine (as opposed to Sephardic cuisine), not "Yiddish cuisine." It's usually kosher, or at least made in a kosher style but not necessarily with strictly kosher ingredients (i.e. regular ol' chicken from the store instead of from the Jewish butcher), and there is delicious food in Israel, particularly Tel Aviv, that incorporates pork and shellfish since many Jews do not keep kosher whatsoever.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3386

    Mar 05, 2016 2:20 PM GMT
    The Torah also doesn't say that one has to use different dishes/utensils, or have different ovens/dishwashers/refrigerators.

    The struggle is real:

    May fish be consumed with dairy?
    Is lox and cream cheese kosher?

    http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/815625/jewish/Is-lox-and-cream-cheese-kosher.htm

    But here's what I find fascinating about this article from an ultra-orthodox site:

    || the Talmud1 warns us not to eat fish with meat, asserting that the combination is unhealthy. This is mentioned in the Code of Jewish Law2 with the admonition that health concerns are to be treated with even greater gravity than ritual laws.3

    But still they are stuck on tradition:

    || But Rabbi Yosef Karo (1488-1575)4 mentions a health restriction concerning eating fish and milk as well. The subsequent commentaries, including Rabbi Moshe Isserles (1520-1572),5 argue that this statement of Rabbi Yosef Karo must be an error, because there is neither Talmudic basis nor any other rabbinical precedent for prohibiting milk and fish.

    || Nevertheless, since Rabbi Yosef Karo wrote that milk and fish should not be mixed, there are those who do not mix them. The Chabad custom is that we do not eat fish together with milk, but we do eat fish with milk products. Even adding a touch of butter or cream to the milk is sufficient to permit mixing it with fish.6 Certainly then, lox and cream cheese can come together onto any Chabad table.

    So if you want to mix the Chabad perspective with your husband's Reconstructionism, I suppose Chicken is ok with milk products. (Though the Chabadniks would find that an abomination because foul, unlike fish, is categorized as fleishig (meat).

    As a secular/atheist Jew, my inclination would be to consult modern medical sources about health issues. icon_smile.gif

    Bunjamon saidMy husband is Reconstructionist and had a rabbi that taught that, since the Torah says not to boil a kid in its mother's milk, and since poultry do not produce milk, and since Rashi apparently said that the interpretation of the word "kid" couldn't include birds, we'll sometimes eat poultry with dairy.