Creatine advice

  • lucozonic

    Posts: 14

    Mar 22, 2016 10:04 PM GMT
    Been loading creatine for 5 days now . Just weighed myself at the gym and haven't gone up in weight or lost any ... How long until I see results ?
  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Mar 23, 2016 1:45 AM GMT
    Well did you weigh yourself at the same time of day at the same level of hydration with the same amount of food in your stomach?

    Weight can vary as much as 2-5 lbs depending on above variables.


    You should see results in the first two weeks, the results being an increase in water retention that makes you appear a little bigger. You should also notice results such as more endurance pretty much right now.

    Creatine doesn't work on 20% of the population give or take as they already have naturally high levels of creatine in their blood stream. You could be in that category, you could have bought a shit product or you could just not be looking close enough for results and not be noticing them. It's not a miracle product, it really just adds a few pounds of water weight and increases endurance, and perhaps aids in recovery due to more water retention.



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    Mar 23, 2016 4:45 AM GMT
    lucozonic saidBeen loading creatine for 5 days now . Just weighed myself at the gym and haven't gone up in weight or lost any ... How long until I see results ?

    What results were you expecting? The stuff isn't going to make you into Mr O.
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    Mar 23, 2016 7:25 AM GMT
    remember to drink more water
  • jrc2005

    Posts: 74

    Mar 23, 2016 11:39 AM GMT
    lucozonic saidBeen loading creatine for 5 days now . Just weighed myself at the gym and haven't gone up in weight or lost any ... How long until I see results ?


    Not even a week? Patience.
  • PTNoge

    Posts: 58

    Mar 23, 2016 5:33 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThe loading phase has been debunked a while ago. So there is no need to do that.

    But as pellaz mentioned, be sure to drink plenty of water. You should be drinking about a gallon of water a day spread throughout the day.


    This is correct and if you are active, yeah, about a gallon (a little less) of water is perfect.

    Creatine isn't a miracle nor steroids. It's naturally found in meat, so a creatine supplement just helps keep you at your maximum levels. You still have to work out and you will get more efficient results, but it will be subtle and occur over weeks. Also, besides the loading phase being debunked (it's just a way to push more product by the supplement companies), the other debunked things are that your gains are just water weight (not true-it's actual increased muscle tissue), it's not bad for your liver or other organs, and you don't have to cycle on and off.

    Disclaimer: I got my PhD in muscle metabolism, so if you want I can show you the studies which support those claims. I used it in my research. It's one of the only supplements that actually works and proven to work.
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    Mar 23, 2016 11:58 PM GMT
    PTNoge said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThe loading phase has been debunked a while ago. So there is no need to do that.

    But as pellaz mentioned, be sure to drink plenty of water. You should be drinking about a gallon of water a day spread throughout the day.


    This is correct and if you are active, yeah, about a gallon (a little less) of water is perfect.

    Creatine isn't a miracle nor steroids. It's naturally found in meat, so a creatine supplement just helps keep you at your maximum levels. You still have to work out and you will get more efficient results, but it will be subtle and occur over weeks. Also, besides the loading phase being debunked (it's just a way to push more product by the supplement companies), the other debunked things are that your gains are just water weight (not true-it's actual increased muscle tissue), it's not bad for your liver or other organs, and you don't have to cycle on and off.

    Disclaimer: I got my PhD in muscle metabolism, so if you want I can show you the studies which support those claims. I used it in my research. It's one of the only supplements that actually works and proven to work.



    I'm one of those people that Creatine works amazingly for. I can lift so much more when I'm on it I feel like I'm on steroids or something. Problem is, last year when I was getting results of some routine blood work, my doctor asked me if I had been taking any creatine supplements because my creatine levels were very high. She was concerned about liver damage and told me to stop using it immediately. So I've been afraid to use it since. I stopped seeing this particular doctor because she gave me the wrong antibiotics for an infection and a couple of other things that made me doubt her knowledge. Since you seem to know a lot about this, how do you make sure you're not consuming too much Creatine? I never took more than the recommended daily dosage.
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    Mar 24, 2016 9:36 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Radd said
    PTNoge said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThe loading phase has been debunked a while ago. So there is no need to do that.

    But as pellaz mentioned, be sure to drink plenty of water. You should be drinking about a gallon of water a day spread throughout the day.


    This is correct and if you are active, yeah, about a gallon (a little less) of water is perfect.

    Creatine isn't a miracle nor steroids. It's naturally found in meat, so a creatine supplement just helps keep you at your maximum levels. You still have to work out and you will get more efficient results, but it will be subtle and occur over weeks. Also, besides the loading phase being debunked (it's just a way to push more product by the supplement companies), the other debunked things are that your gains are just water weight (not true-it's actual increased muscle tissue), it's not bad for your liver or other organs, and you don't have to cycle on and off.

    Disclaimer: I got my PhD in muscle metabolism, so if you want I can show you the studies which support those claims. I used it in my research. It's one of the only supplements that actually works and proven to work.



    I'm one of those people that Creatine works amazingly for. I can lift so much more when I'm on it I feel like I'm on steroids or something. Problem is, last year when I was getting results of some routine blood work, my doctor asked me if I had been taking any creatine supplements because my creatine levels were very high. She was concerned about liver damage and told me to stop using it immediately. So I've been afraid to use it since. I stopped seeing this particular doctor because she gave me the wrong antibiotics for an infection and a couple of other things that made me doubt her knowledge. Since you seem to know a lot about this, how do you make sure you're not consuming too much Creatine? I never took more than the recommended daily dosage.


    For the umpteenth time, Scruffie. It's not creatine that is measured in a metabolic blood and urine panel. It's "creatinine." Creatinine is the byproduct of creatine. A metabolic test does not measure creatine. How many times are we going to get it through your hollow skull? And it's not the liver that is affected by high creatinine levels. High creatinine levels can be a sign of kidney damage.

    Take some initiative for once. Take control of your health and start reading up online:

    http://www.medicinenet.com/creatinine_blood_test/article.htm





    I don't need nutrition advice from a bitchy hair dresser but thanks for the attitude.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Mar 24, 2016 10:33 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThe loading phase has been debunked a while ago. So there is no need to do that.

    But as pellaz mentioned, be sure to drink plenty of water. You should be drinking about a gallon of water a day spread throughout the day.


    A gallon a day?!?! That would be 16 glasses! It would be almost impossible to pass a public convenience without stopping.
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    Mar 24, 2016 11:32 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Radd said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Radd said
    PTNoge said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThe loading phase has been debunked a while ago. So there is no need to do that.

    But as pellaz mentioned, be sure to drink plenty of water. You should be drinking about a gallon of water a day spread throughout the day.


    This is correct and if you are active, yeah, about a gallon (a little less) of water is perfect.

    Creatine isn't a miracle nor steroids. It's naturally found in meat, so a creatine supplement just helps keep you at your maximum levels. You still have to work out and you will get more efficient results, but it will be subtle and occur over weeks. Also, besides the loading phase being debunked (it's just a way to push more product by the supplement companies), the other debunked things are that your gains are just water weight (not true-it's actual increased muscle tissue), it's not bad for your liver or other organs, and you don't have to cycle on and off.

    Disclaimer: I got my PhD in muscle metabolism, so if you want I can show you the studies which support those claims. I used it in my research. It's one of the only supplements that actually works and proven to work.



    I'm one of those people that Creatine works amazingly for. I can lift so much more when I'm on it I feel like I'm on steroids or something. Problem is, last year when I was getting results of some routine blood work, my doctor asked me if I had been taking any creatine supplements because my creatine levels were very high. She was concerned about liver damage and told me to stop using it immediately. So I've been afraid to use it since. I stopped seeing this particular doctor because she gave me the wrong antibiotics for an infection and a couple of other things that made me doubt her knowledge. Since you seem to know a lot about this, how do you make sure you're not consuming too much Creatine? I never took more than the recommended daily dosage.


    For the umpteenth time, Scruffie. It's not creatine that is measured in a metabolic blood and urine panel. It's "creatinine." Creatinine is the byproduct of creatine. A metabolic test does not measure creatine. How many times are we going to get it through your hollow skull? And it's not the liver that is affected by high creatinine levels. High creatinine levels can be a sign of kidney damage.

    Take some initiative for once. Take control of your health and start reading up online:

    http://www.medicinenet.com/creatinine_blood_test/article.htm



    I don't need nutrition advice from a bitchy hair dresser but thanks for the attitude.


    Well, that's a typical cunty response from an unstable, affected "boutique" gallery shop owner. Pink and and the word "boutique" go well together, don't you think? icon_lol.gif

    But in any event, you're welcome. Since you want to spread lies about me and call me the "RJ racist" when clearly you wear that crown so well, it's the least I can do.



    I don't own a fucking boutique of any kind, but thanks for playing. icon_lol.gif
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    Mar 25, 2016 1:20 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Radd said
    I don't own a fucking boutique of any kind, but thanks for playing. icon_lol.gif


    By definition, you do.

    It's ludicrous on your part to stereotype hair dressers and interior designers when you sell artwork in your little boutique. They all fit within the stereotype.

    Scruffie's boutique.

    Has a nice ring to it.

    icon_lol.gif




    That's about as true as me saying you own a lumber supply. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • PTNoge

    Posts: 58

    Mar 25, 2016 1:21 AM GMT
    Dynamo_spark saidCreatine is used for the replenshing of muscle fatigue. It helps also to repair muscle damage. Scientists however comment that it causes fluid retention, so if one weighs one-self you may weigh differently one day than the next.


    This has been disproven. It doesn't just add water weight.
  • PTNoge

    Posts: 58

    Mar 25, 2016 1:26 AM GMT
    [quote]I'm one of those people that Creatine works amazingly for. I can lift so much more when I'm on it I feel like I'm on steroids or something. Problem is, last year when I was getting results of some routine blood work, my doctor asked me if I had been taking any creatine supplements because my creatine levels were very high. She was concerned about liver damage and told me to stop using it immediately. So I've been afraid to use it since. I stopped seeing this particular doctor because she gave me the wrong antibiotics for an infection and a couple of other things that made me doubt her knowledge. Since you seem to know a lot about this, how do you make sure you're not consuming too much Creatine? I never took more than the recommended daily dosage. [/quote]

    I find general MD's not very knowledgeable in exercise science and nutrition. It's not really in their curriculum; unless you have an MD that has a specialty in it or a special interest and educates themselves. I train a few MD's and we discuss this all the time. The liver and kidney thing has been debunked, as well.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Mar 25, 2016 1:39 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    FRE0 said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidThe loading phase has been debunked a while ago. So there is no need to do that.

    But as pellaz mentioned, be sure to drink plenty of water. You should be drinking about a gallon of water a day spread throughout the day.


    A gallon a day?!?! That would be 16 glasses! It would be almost impossible to pass a public convenience without stopping.


    Hey! There you are! I haven't seen you online in a while. I thought you left the site. Glad you're still here.

    Basically I drink four of these a day. It's not all that hard. I drink a full water bottle in the morning and then try to space out the other three but not too late in the day. It's not wise to drink too much water three to four hours before bed as keeps me going to the bathroom throughout the night.

    A 32 ounce water bottle by Rubbermaid:

    14731989?wid=480&hei=480


    In hot summer weather I can drink that much if I am doing long distance bicycle riding with the temperature at 95F but not otherwise.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Mar 25, 2016 11:35 PM GMT
    Here's a letter to the editor about Creatine; the writer asserts that it is lethal:

    http://letters.fijitimes.com/LettersToTheEditor/346737/Creatine-is-lethal


    And here is the article that prompted the letter:

    http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=346401

  • PTNoge

    Posts: 58

    Mar 26, 2016 8:13 PM GMT
    Someone sent me direct messaged calling out my bullshit--just kidding--he was just asking if I had the references handy. I did and thought I'd share them for everyone else, as well! The Olsen et al article is super interesting because it shows a possible mechanism or alternative function than extra energy stores during exercise.

    Groeneveld, G. J., Beijer, C., Veldink, J. H., Kalmijn, S., Wokke, J. H., & van den Berg, L. H. (2005). Few adverse effects of long-term creatine supplementation in a placebo-controlled trial. International Journal of Sports Medicine , 26 (4), 307-313.

    Hultman, E., Soderland, K., Timmons, J. A., Cederblad, G., & Greenhaff, P. L. (1996). Muscle creatine loading in men. 81 (1), 232-237.

    Kley, R. A., Vorgerd, M., & Tarnopolsky, M. A. (2007). Creatine for treating muscle disorders. Cochrane Database System Review , 24 (1).

    Kreider, R. B., Ferreira, M., Wilson, M., Grindstaff, P., Plisk, S., Reinardy, J., et al. (199icon_cool.gif. Effects of creatine supplementation on body composition, strength, and sprint performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise , 30 (1), 73-82.

    Mihic, S., MacDonald, J. R., McKenzie, S., & Tarnopolsky, M. A. (2000). Acute creatine loading increases fat-free mass, but does not affect blood pressure, plasma cratinine, or CK activity in men and women. 32 (2), 291.

    Olsen, S., Aagaard, P., Kadi, F., Tufekovic, G., Verney, J., Olesen, J. L., et al. (2006). Creatine Supplementation augments the increase in satellite cell and myonuclei number in human skeletal muscle induced my strength training. (534, Ed.) The Journal of Physiology , 273 (2), 525.

    Poortmans, J. R., & Francaux, M. (1999). Long-term oral cretine supplementation does not impair renal function in healthy athletes. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise , 31 (icon_cool.gif, 1108-1110.

    Taylor, A., Gollnick, P. D., & Green, H. (1990). Energy metabolism and fatigue. In D. Hultman, J. Bergstrom, L. Spreit, & K. Soderlund, Biochemsitry of Exercise VII (pp. 73-92). Champaign: Human Kinetics.

    Williams, M. H., & Branch, J. D. (199icon_cool.gif. Creatine Supplementation and Exericse Performance: An UPdate. Journal of the American College of Nutrition , 17 (3), 216-234.
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    Mar 27, 2016 2:00 AM GMT
    The reason your doctor freaked out a bit is that appearance of higher-than-average levels of *creatinine*in samples *tends* to indicate a medical problem. However, since creatinine is also the direct problem of creatine metabolism, taking creatine will elevate the creatinine levels *without* any underlying medical condition.

    I was once in hospital for an infection, and when they got the labs back the doctor asked if I had any underlying chronic health issues. The first thing I asked was "my creatinine levels were high, weren't they?" He said yes - so I pointed out that I was taking creatine - and he said...oh, ok.

    It won't *cause* damage, but it can generate a false positive indication of *possible* damage.

    It *also* does some fluid retention (not *only* - but yes, it does do some)

    As for the letter to the editor claiming it is toxic, the stupid, it burns......

    If creatine was toxic, you'd die after eating a steak, as red meat is one of the most common sources in the diet of the stuff....

    Doctor9
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    Mar 27, 2016 2:22 AM GMT
    Doctor9 saidThe reason your doctor freaked out a bit is that appearance of higher-than-average levels of *creatinine*in samples *tends* to indicate a medical problem. However, since creatinine is also the direct problem of creatine metabolism, taking creatine will elevate the creatinine levels *without* any underlying medical condition.

    I was once in hospital for an infection, and when they got the labs back the doctor asked if I had any underlying chronic health issues. The first thing I asked was "my creatinine levels were high, weren't they?" He said yes - so I pointed out that I was taking creatine - and he said...oh, ok.

    It won't *cause* damage, but it can generate a false positive indication of *possible* damage.

    It *also* does some fluid retention (not *only* - but yes, it does do some)

    As for the letter to the editor claiming it is toxic, the stupid, it burns......

    If creatine was toxic, you'd die after eating a steak, as red meat is one of the most common sources in the diet of the stuff....

    Doctor9



    This is helpful. Although not sure why my doctor told me to lay off it even after my levels returned to normal. But like I said....I stopped going to her because she did a couple of things that were not proper procedure, like prescribing the wrong antibiotics. Thanks for your input.
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    Mar 27, 2016 3:17 AM GMT
    Doctor9 saidIf creatine was toxic, you'd die after eating a steak, as red meat is one of the most common sources in the diet of the stuff....

    I'm guessing that eating a steak would be more enjoyable than the usual nasty tasting powder stuff.
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    Mar 27, 2016 5:16 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Doctor9 saidIf creatine was toxic, you'd die after eating a steak, as red meat is one of the most common sources in the diet of the stuff....

    I'm guessing that eating a steak would be more enjoyable than the usual nasty tasting powder stuff.


    But more expensive!
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    Mar 27, 2016 7:59 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Doctor9 saidIf creatine was toxic, you'd die after eating a steak, as red meat is one of the most common sources in the diet of the stuff....

    I'm guessing that eating a steak would be more enjoyable than the usual nasty tasting powder stuff.

    Tastes better if you mix it with juice or sports drink.
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    Mar 27, 2016 4:35 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Doctor9 saidIf creatine was toxic, you'd die after eating a steak, as red meat is one of the most common sources in the diet of the stuff....

    I'm guessing that eating a steak would be more enjoyable than the usual nasty tasting powder stuff.



    There are literally thousands of different protein powders on the market and each one offering different flavors. The range of palatableness varies wildly. I mix mine with coconut milk and it makes all of them taste much better than with water.
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    Mar 27, 2016 7:04 PM GMT
    I wonder if there's a table somewhere which lists the creatine levels in the different meats? ... Ok, a google search for "creatine meat sources" found a paper (pdf) from some Texas university. In a nutshell raw fish has the most. Cooking meat reduces the creatine levels.

    So eat lots of sushi. (But the idea of eating raw fish gives me the heebie jeebies.)
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    Mar 28, 2016 2:06 AM GMT
    general protein (inc creatine) has its toll on the liver.

    Lumpy has a point:
    "table somewhere which lists the creatine levels" difficult determining how much you have ingested.

    too much creatine and or to little water could lead to muscle cramps or death. Totally serious on the muscle cramps.
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    Mar 28, 2016 3:23 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Doctor9 saidIf creatine was toxic, you'd die after eating a steak, as red meat is one of the most common sources in the diet of the stuff....
    I'm guessing that eating a steak would be more enjoyable than the usual nasty tasting powder stuff.
    Tastes better if you mix it with juice or sports drink.

    With ceviche the fish is "cooked" by letting it soak in lime juice. Cooking meat reduces its creatine level. I wonder if mixing the powder with a citrus juice cooks it and reduces the amount of available creatine?

    Something to file away in your "I don't want to think about that" folder.