What is the best looking car ever made ?

  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Mar 23, 2016 6:28 PM GMT
    For me it is the Aston Martin DBS from around 2008-2012, absolutely beautiful design by Ian Callum who is British and also designed the Audi A5 amongst other things, very talented guy, if anyone can upload a picture for me because I am a total technophobe and don't know how, that would be great, looks best in black and will buy one hopefully one day, how, I'm not sure but I will.
  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Mar 23, 2016 7:25 PM GMT

    Pics or it didn't happen!
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    Mar 23, 2016 9:26 PM GMT

    Best, looking car? That is very subjective, as tastes vary, year by year, these are some of my favorites

    any year, Bugatti Veyron

    IMG12580802.jpg


    1959 Rolls Royce Silver Cloud (from movie Grand Theft Auto)

    gta1221tq.6717.jpg


    1969 Dodge Charger

    3026700470_7d2af5422c_z.jpg


    1932 Ford Roadster (with rumble seat)

    1932fordrdster122011.jpg
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Mar 23, 2016 11:13 PM GMT
    ELNathB said
    Best, looking car? That is very subjective, as tastes vary, year by year, these are some of my favorites

    any year, Bugatti Veyron

    IMG12580802.jpg


    1959 Rolls Royce Silver Cloud (from movie Grand Theft Auto)

    gta1221tq.6717.jpg


    1969 Dodge Charger

    3026700470_7d2af5422c_z.jpg


    1932 Ford Roadster (with rumble seat)

    1932fordrdster122011.jpg


    Have you seen the new Bugatti Chiron, it just got unveiled at the Geneva Auto show? thats even better than the Veyron, amazing interior.
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    Mar 24, 2016 12:02 AM GMT
    A 1930s Duesenberg dual cowl phaeton. Phaeton meant it was a rag-top, windowless touring car. Dual cowl meant it had 2 windshields, the second for the rear seat passengers.

    The SJ was a supercharged straight 8, dual overhead cam engine, when most cars in the US were side-valve flatheads, producing about a fifth of the horsepower of this thing. Actually a US car, despite the German name, it was the fastest road car ever made in the US until the Corvette in the 1950s.

    It held 1920s land speed records and won the Indianapolis 500 race a couple of times. It's still considered by many car historians as the finest automobile ever produced in the United States, and certainly the most expensive for its time. And subject to the body style (the Duesenberg brothers sold you the chassis, you selected the coach work & builder yourself, though there was a prescribed company appearance), I think some of them qualify as one of the best looking cars ever made.

    Oh, and BTW, the old US phrase, "It's a Deusie", almost forgotten today, and meaning something that's over-the-top, comes from this car. Because in its day nothing could match it.

    duesenberg_sj_562_2592_dual_cowl_phaeton

    duesenberg_sj_562_2592_dual_cowl_phaeton
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    Mar 24, 2016 12:30 AM GMT
    ELNathB said
    Best, looking car? That is very subjective, as tastes vary, year by year, these are some of my favorites

    any year, Bugatti Veyron

    IMG12580802.jpg

    The Bugatti is now just an acquired name and badge, by VW. I would prefer an original one, built by Ettore Bugatti himself. Like this Type 41 "Royale" limousine.

    Bugatti-Type_41_Royale_1932_1600x1200_wa

    Some say this is the largest car ever built. Aside from the modern stretch limo aberrations. A human standing next to it is dwarfed, I can barely look over the hood of it, though its gigantic dimensions stay in familiar proportion, with 23-inch wheels that belie its size. Ettore Bugatti, with his outrageous non-conformity, crowned what he called his greatest creation with a rearing elephant as a radiator figure. Difficult to see here.
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    Mar 24, 2016 1:08 AM GMT
    Here's just a personal favorite of mine. I would give anything if I could own this, and it's located not 10 miles from me. A 1939 Packard V-12 convertible. Now if this isn't a stunningly beautiful car, then I don't know what is.

    Can you imagine yourself driving around town in this? Of course it's got a manual transmission with clutch, with a 3-speed "standard" shift on the steering column. A configuration I've driven before, would present no problem. But I might have modern turn signal lights added, in a way that they could be easily removed for any car shows, to keep it original.

    Packard39conv1.jpg

    Packard39conv2.jpg

    Packard%2039%20convdash_zps00wiwanf.jpg

    Yes, folks, that's a 3-speed standard manual shift on the column, not an automatic. Not very sporty to shift it, and rather slack in feeling, since it required about a dozen rods & pivots to transmit the action to the transmission far below behind the engine. But the motivation was to clear the floor of the shift lever for front bench seating, and so the driver could slide over to the passenger door when desired. These things were not performance sport cars, but sedate passenger cars. Speed shifting was not seen as a requirement. In fact, with some cars not yet having synchromesh transmissions (Brit: gear box), or just for second & third speeds, shifting was necessarily a leisurely exercise.
  • Ariodante83

    Posts: 152

    Mar 24, 2016 2:23 AM GMT
    latest?cb=20090908145331
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    Mar 24, 2016 3:16 AM GMT
    The Homer!
    http://www.giantfreakinrobot.com/sci/homer-simpsons-car-future-exists-present.html
  • Ariodante83

    Posts: 152

    Mar 24, 2016 3:17 AM GMT
    Whatever Homer waaaaants....Hoomer geeets.......
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    Mar 24, 2016 4:00 AM GMT
    holy crap, I assume those are working rear cowl vents in that new Chiron design.


    Chiron-main-xxlarge_trans++tv-TLCCJuuMJ8
    bugatti-vision-grandturismo-159-1.jpg
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Mar 24, 2016 7:59 AM GMT
    One4u2c saidNot Range Rover. Why the fuck do I have a car that is in the shop half a year. I actually would go with ford again from my high school days. I had a mustang convertible that never did me wrong. But this shit rover I will never do agsin.


    How old is the Range Rover because I think the newer ones are better?
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    Mar 24, 2016 8:08 AM GMT
    ELNathB saidholy crap, I assume those are working rear cowl vents in that new Chiron design.

    An interesting fact about modern Bugatti model names, like Chiron and Veyron, is that they're the last names of famous winning Bugatti professional drivers from races in the 1920s-30s. When Bugatti was a major competitor in closed road races (not track), like the Grand Prix. In fact, a Bugatti won the very first Grand Prix ever held. And some of their records for unbroken winning streaks still haven't been surpassed to this day.
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    Mar 24, 2016 2:55 PM GMT
    Here's an example of silly 1959 American excess, the Cadillac. Not a beautiful car by my definition, though some see it that way. I think of it more as a piece of sculpture, but ridiculous on the road. I remember how that huge rear overhang (the body extension behind the rear axle to the bumper) would scrape and get caught up as these behemoths pulled off the road into gas stations, having to cross ramped sidewalks.

    1959-cadillac-eldorado-9126_zpsifp67nch.

    1959_Cadillac-Eldorado_1959-04_zpsmbi82y
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    Mar 24, 2016 3:10 PM GMT
    Some of the 1930's brought out the most beautiful cars like the Duesenbergs and the Bugattis , those cars weren't just beautiful , they were piece of art !
    I like quirky looking cars , one of my favourite is the Citroen DS , which isn't beautiful per say , but had and sitll have a futuristic look to it and was full of advanced thechnologies

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSmMhrKNoKCVkvULYtAxSa

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRij__cz5TuRPURHuxLqLT

    Now days most of the cars are designed by computers , they are missing that human factor icon_sad.gif
  • Hypertrophile

    Posts: 1021

    Mar 24, 2016 3:16 PM GMT
    The Studebaker Avati is my all time favorite. Love the clean lines.

    studebaker-1963_avanti.jpg

    1963StudebakerAvanti_01_700.jpg

    1963-studebaker-avanti-rear.jpg
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    Mar 24, 2016 3:30 PM GMT
    neffa saidSome of the 1930's brought out the most beautiful cars like the Duesenbergs and the Bugattis , those cars weren't just beautiful , they were piece of art !
    I like quirky looking cars , one of my favourite is the Citroen DS , which isn't beautiful per say , but had and sitll have a futuristic look to it and was full of advanced thechnologies

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSmMhrKNoKCVkvULYtAxSa

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRij__cz5TuRPURHuxLqLT

    Now days most of the cars are designed by computers , they are missing that human factor icon_sad.gif

    I think the Citroen did have a kind of beauty. I first sat in one at the 1965 New York City International Car Show. You sank into inches of foam upholstery. and the wheel suspension was air and adjustable. Allowing the cars to "self jack" themselves for tire replacement on the road in case of puncture.

    You set the air suspension on its highest setting. Next you placed a jack support, provided in the trunk, under the car frame nearest the puncture. Then you reset the air suspension to its lowest position. Et voila! Your flat tire now hung free of the road for replacement with the spare. You reversed the suspension procedure to be on your way again. No manual jacking of the car required.

    And of course it was front wheel drive. I believe the only car being sold with front drive in the US at the time, no US companies made them. Along with other quirky Citroen features like the "No Spoke" steering wheel.

    A wonderfully eccentric car, I thought it looked so aerodynamic compared to boxy US cars of the period. But I could never get my parents interested in one, while my own eyes were set on a 2-seater British open roadster for when I turned 17 and got my license in 1966. But my parents had other ideas... icon_sad.gif
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    Mar 24, 2016 3:30 PM GMT
    Spotted this
    9d48b5aaabf24a817dc9fb1f550ea33d.jpg
    in a dealer near me last Saturday, overshadowed the
    ferrari-dino-246-gt-09.jpg
    and
    isdera_imperator_large_23483.jpg
    next to it. The 2 Enzos were just ugly.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1030

    Mar 24, 2016 3:45 PM GMT
    Hands down, best looking car ever made, period.
    RossBatmobile.jpg
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Mar 24, 2016 3:48 PM GMT
    I don't have a picture to attach but IMO the 1953 Studebaker Commander Starlight Hardtop/Coupe is the "Venus De Milo" of modern automobile design.




    icon_cool.gif
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    Mar 24, 2016 3:55 PM GMT
    kew1 saidSpotted this
    9d48b5aaabf24a817dc9fb1f550ea33d.jpg

    I initially thought Lagonda with that radiator grille, but you may have me stumped with this. A challenge with low-volume motor cars is they frequently have custom-made bodies, making identification more difficult.
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    Mar 24, 2016 4:02 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    neffa saidSome of the 1930's brought out the most beautiful cars like the Duesenbergs and the Bugattis , those cars weren't just beautiful , they were piece of art !
    I like quirky looking cars , one of my favourite is the Citroen DS , which isn't beautiful per say , but had and sitll have a futuristic look to it and was full of advanced thechnologies

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSmMhrKNoKCVkvULYtAxSa

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRij__cz5TuRPURHuxLqLT

    Now days most of the cars are designed by computers , they are missing that human factor icon_sad.gif

    I think the Citroen did have a kind of beauty. I first sat in one at the 1965 New York City International Car Show. You sank into inches of foam upholstery. and the wheel suspension was air and adjustable. Allowing the cars to "self jack" themselves for tire replacement on the road in case of puncture.

    You set the air suspension on its highest setting. Next you placed a jack support, provided in the trunk, under the car frame nearest the puncture. Then you reset the air suspension to its lowest position. Et voila! Your flat tire now hung free of the road for replacement with the spare. You reversed the suspension procedure to be on your way again. No manual jacking of the car required.

    And of course it was front wheel drive. I believe the only car being sold with front drive in the US at the time, no US companies made them. Along with other quirky Citroen features like the "No Spoke" steering wheel.

    A wonderfully eccentric car, I thought it looked so aerodynamic compared to boxy US cars of the period. But I could never get my parents interested in one, while my own eyes were set on a 2-seater British roadster for when I turned 17 and got my license. But my parents had other ideas... icon_sad.gif


    In Australia , they were called , the queens of the corrugated roads , as their advanced suspension would make them fly above the corrugations , my uncle had 2 ( still has one). Not only the car would self-level itself when weight was added in , but as you mention you could also manually change the ground clearance as well , on the highest position , it was getting as much ground clearance than a 4WD . I recall how cool it was , when my uncle would start the car , and in a minute or so it would first lift her back and then her front and settle in , so futuristic for a kid dreaming about the year 2000 ..lol..
    BTW , it wasn't a air suspention , it was hydraulic , a hydraulic pump connected to a hydraulic accumulator and 5 green spheres was taking car of the suspension , brakes and power assist stearing ..I do also recall that the high-beams were directional too ...
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    Mar 24, 2016 4:07 PM GMT
    Hypertrophile saidThe Studebaker Avati is my all time favorite. Love the clean lines.

    studebaker-1963_avanti.jpg

    1963StudebakerAvanti_01_700.jpg

    1963-studebaker-avanti-rear.jpg

    Groundbreaking for its day, but now I would judge it dumpy & dorky. Its time has passed. Just like the cars of today will look in 20 or 30 years, like the ones that preceded them. With only a few meriting the badge of a lasting classic. I'm not sure if the Avanti rates that. It was, after all, just a reskinned Studebaker, in the declining years of that make. When it was about as behind in technology as a horse-drawn buckboard, how Studebaker started.
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Mar 24, 2016 8:14 PM GMT
    One4u2c said
    One4u2c saidNot Range Rover. Why the fuck do I have a car that is in the shop half a year. I actually would go with ford again from my high school days. I had a mustang convertible that never did me wrong. But this shit rover I will never do agsin.


    2012 icon_cry.gif


    I was thinking of a Range rover Sport next instead of my Land Rover, however after your opinion of such a new car, I think I may reconsider getting one, I was thinking of one around that age, prefer the old shape over the new model. Its a shame you had a bad experience with it.
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Mar 24, 2016 8:15 PM GMT
    Can someone upload the Aston DBS for me because i'm a dim wit and have no idea how to do that, thanks.