getting started...

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    Feb 08, 2009 6:13 PM GMT
    im at a loss, and its been bothering me so deeply (im a worrier by nature) that my skin's broken out, i've been having fitful sleep replete with nightmares, and i've had this constant knot in my stomach.

    background:
    its my fourth year in a five year major- interior architecture/design- in a top ranked program. when i chose the major four years ago, i did so because the economy was booming, and thus so was design- it was secure, potentially lucrative, i'm good at it, and i love doing it. my plan was firmly set- i'd graduated from high school with good grades and a slew of skills and acclimates, entering the top program for design in the country- i would work my ass off, graduate debt-free and with a job (the school is known for guaranteeing placement.. well it was till now) in a top design firm doing glamorous work, get a nice first apartment for the first couple years before building the capital for my first place...... but now a year from graduation with the end in sight, after so many sleepless nights of hard work, the world has turned on its head and all of that's been erased like an etch-e-sketch.

    this economy has made design a dead profession. my degree is versatile- i could work as a professor, or own a high end designer furniture store, or be an editor for a design magazine, etc.... but everything that touches on design is dead in the water right now. and the economy isn't going to get better for years- its gonna get worse before it gets better. we're headed into a full-out depression and we all know it.

    my fear is one shared by many people on the cusp of graduation whose futures are now shaky at best right now... my situation's just worse than most because my chosen field is poisonous, and i've been relatively sheltered and well-supported thus far. i've been focusing so hard on school- on doing well academically and developing design skills, cultivating intelligence and other important areas of myself... but i have no life skills. i have no idea how to get my first apartment with no initial money after graduating, how to pay bills, juggle bills with groceries and with everything else daily life requires- i have no idea what i'll be doing in a year when i graduate- what's available to me job-wise...... none of that is taught in school......... will i be waiting tables? bar-tending? if so, what was the point of these 5 grueling years of earning a degree? i could have just dropped out of high school and bar-tended. i did everything right... i'm not a failure... so why do i feel like one?

    my dreams have eroded before my eyes, my future even one year out is so blurry i can't bring it into focus, i have no idea how to support myself or get started and yet am left with the certainty that i'll be completely on my own a matter of months from now.... i don't even have an idea what reputable jobs i'd be suited for or how to find them given this economy!

    a fight with my parents this morning made all of this glaringly evident to me- i'd had it in the back of my mind but i was forced to confront it all today, and i'm beside myself. i didn't understand why that man had killed his family and then himself when he lost his job and house recently, but im beginning to understand the dread and despair of such daunting difficulties.

    i know i may be over-reacting to the situation, or seem like it, or i could just finally be snapping after a year of anxiety over the issue- i AM a certified worry-wort by nature, and it just hit me how helpless i am concerning practical things, having lived so much of my life in my own mind and musings. i don't generally do well with reality but its staring me down right now..


    this isn't entirely whining- i'm genuinely looking for constructive input and advice.... or maybe just for people to tell me it'll be ok... i don't know....but for my sake as well as for others who are in similar boats- many of us are i think.


    what will i do?
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    Feb 08, 2009 6:33 PM GMT
    czarodziej saidwhat will i do?

    Stick with your original plans unless absolutely forced to abandon them. You have too much already invested, and are too close to completion now, to cut and run at this point.

    As you point out, a completed degree might be good for something, if not initially in the chosen field. Far better than an incomplete degree that's worth next to nothing.

    If you MUST withdraw from college, discuss with your school registrar and academic advisor how to do this in a way that maximizes your ability to resume your degree work at a later date. Avoid at all costs withdrawing mid-semester and getting incomplete or failing grades. Don't damage your good transcript.

    Unless you haven't told us the full story here, and you're doing OK academically, then your POST-graduate concerns should be kept separate from normal PRE-graduate concerns about finishing your degree. Take one thing at a time, graduate as planned, and then see where you stand. Don't anticipate problems you may not have.

    There used to be a saying: "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched." In your case, it might be "Don't kill your chickens before they're hatched."
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    Feb 08, 2009 6:46 PM GMT
    red vespa: true- im not looking to drop out; i've worked too hard and done too well- my worries are all for what comes after. its not so distant in the future that i can just ignore it any more- and my parents are daily reminding me of how harsh the world will be and of how i need to be saving mass amounts of money- which i can't really do because they also expect me to pay for everything daily life requires in the meantime, and i have no time with my demanding major for much of a job. so the perfectly necessary, but conflictingly unreasonable demands they're placing on me to save, and my mom's daily nagging about being prepared for the harsh reality of being on my own in the world, have me on the edge of a nervous break down. i have my senior thesis project to start worrying about (the department is disparagingly disorganized concerning that, adding to my stress there) and i don't have time or energy left to worry about the looming real world- but its been made very clear that its something that needs to be addressed and thought about. icon_sad.gif


    animanimus: good sound advice- you certainly have the design studio culture down to a tee. i know the field moves in cycles... but this is as bad as a downturn's been since the 30's and from what i've been hearing on tv, its simply not going to reverse itself anytime soon. im just worried because i don't have my own firm to defend, i don't have anything- i don't have money to save right now for the hard times; im starting out in the hard times and i don't know how to do that..... the day i graduate and my parents say- congrats, now you're on your own... and i have no money or knowledge of what to do next. i really do appreciate what you said though- its certainly true that once i get the ball rolling those will all be truths worth observing..
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    Feb 08, 2009 6:58 PM GMT
    Was house sitting for mom and dad while they took a week long vacation driving around the Great Lakes.
    I met them at the car as they drove in 3-days later fearing something had gone wrong.
    "Nope," mom said, "that was your dad's idea of a vacation. He accidentally [on purpose] missed nearly every exit off the interstate...every detour to something unplanned or possibly interesting. It was like a race to get back home."

    Clearly, mom understood it was the journey that was fun, not the destination.
    Dad didn't get it.

    A road block/detour or breakdown might have saved that vacation.
    Maybe this is your detour.

    So what if you have to take a brainless job for a little while after you graduate?
    And maybe you'll have to have a less nice apt or one with a roommate or, God forbid, bunk with the folks for a while.

    This stuff builds character.

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    Feb 08, 2009 7:03 PM GMT

    czarodziej saidi've been focusing so hard on school- on doing well academically and developing design skills, cultivating intelligence and other important areas of myself... but i have no life skills.

    First of all you are equipped. And the only way you acquire life skills is just to go out there! Consider living in a real strange foreign land. We've talk last year about expanding your options to venture here in the Middle East. Make sure you read any contracts carefully before getting into any. That's the very first thing I was so keen doing after graduation on a job hunt. In reality, you would need to rent and learn to save diligently before you could afford your own place. It took me 8 years to do that, 3 years after graduating from college.
    If you can't make your way directly to your dreams, build your plans around it as contingency plan. It like changing your routes but still geared towards the same destination.
    It's scary, I know. But let that fear fuel your passion and determination. Believe me, when you get used to waking up everyday with a little anxiety attack, it would be an enjoyable thrill, like wasabi on sushi!
    And the most fabulous thing of them all is that you got your family and friends right behind you watching each baby step you make in this thing we call living in the real world. icon_wink.gif

    PAPAAAAAAAAAAAA........ WAACCCCCTTTTTTTTTHHHHHHH MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEHHH FLLLLLYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    n669316244_236932_8391.jpg
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    Feb 08, 2009 7:07 PM GMT
    Very little in the private sector economy right now is in good shape. The hospitals and prisons are booming, but not much else.

    If you love what you are doing then you are already ahead of the majority of people. Hopefully the economy will start getting better in 2010, if not then you have other options as you mentioned.

    Czarodziej what you are experiencing is something that used to be common every 7 or 8 years, a recession. It is just your generation has never had to experience it (the last serious one was in the early 90s). Fortunately for your generation the baby boomers are approaching retirement age. When they leave there will be dearth of talented people, and you will likely be in high demand. You just have to be patient.
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:25 PM GMT
    all true- i don't doubt that i'll be at least capable of fumbling out a meager existence renting a crappy apartment with roommates and bar-tending/serving until the economy picks up...
    but it hasn't been this bad since the Great Depression (my school administrators admitted they've never seen it this bad, at least in the last 30 years they've been working there)... and so i know there won't be any quick or easy or even remotely immanent fix. and its likely to get a lot worse first. i'm frustrated because i know i'm better than that- i'm trained and skilled for white collar work, i'll have a degree i'll have poured sweat blood and tears into, and my plans for a successful and secure life are being set back (at the very best) by enough years to make my youth a squandered thing. i don't mean to sound condescending, but you have to understand what i've gone through and how hard i've worked already to make my dreams a reality.... i had hoped to get a good foothold on fiscal success, security, and comfort while still young, but now, its looking like i'll only be able to find jobs i could have done as a high school dropout. my major doesn't necessarily qualify me for anything outside of design, or things touching on design.
    i realize that many are in the same boat- being set back, loosing what they've built up which is almost worse than not being able to build anything at all, etc.... and i know my stress and anxiety here is not unique. that's one reason i'm posting.... i just have the added anxiety, on top of the state of the economy, of not knowing what to do when i graduate. or how to manage myself alone. sure, my parents will be watching supportively from a distance, but they've made it very clear that after paying for my BA, their parental obligations are done and i'm on my own.
    and while i'd love to explore options like moving to a different country- they're all suffering too, and the ones that aren't yet, will be. icon_sad.gif


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    Feb 08, 2009 8:28 PM GMT
    i guess now would be the time to join a buddhist monastery in the Tibetan mountains.
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:33 PM GMT
    These are being advertised in the DC area....

    Does this sound like the kind of job you would be looking for?

    Sr./Jr. Interior Designers/Space Planners to service our federal government clients in the Mid-Atlantic region (Maryland, Washington, DC, Virginia). Candidates must possess a thorough knowledge of architectural principles, strong analytical skills, and experience in large commercial facilities. Strong written, verbal, organizational and interpersonal skills are required in order to effectively interface and communicate with a variety of audiences.

    Duties and responsibilities may include:

    Develop program requirements, prepare statements of work, review proposals to ensure that requirements are met on contracts for major construction, maintenance, repair and installation of equipment. Review and approve construction drawings. Coordinate projects for federal agencies and act as team leader or supervisor. Oversee and evaluate the work of contractors.

    Additional responsibilities may include strategic planning, space programming, CADD, floor plan design, furniture, design presentation, and installation supervision.


    How about this?

    Corporate Interior Designer/ Project Manager

    This position involves developing design concepts for large-scale corporate and regional office reconfiguration and expansion projects and managing all aspects of the project, including but not limited to, furniture and finish specifications, construction, power, voice, and data cabling, furniture installation, and move management. Additional duties include maintaining current floor plans of all properties and associated documentation.


    PRINCIPAL RESPONSIBILITIES


    *Coordinate meetings, prepare agendas, develop and maintain master project budget and timelines as required for each project and project phase to ensure overall project objectives are met. Keep management team apprised of progress at all times.
    *Prepare and coordinate project reports and drawing reviews for project team (as applicable) at conceptual, schematic, design development and construction phases of project.
    *Assist in the selection and contracting process of consultants and construction teams for each project.
    *Review requisitions, change orders and other invoices associated with the project and confer with client management team on costs and impacts.
    *Observe corporate, building, and client/owner policies and procedures.
    Maintain high qualitative and quantitative standards of work performance.
    Strive constantly to improve skill and work knowledge; keep up to date in the field of specialization.
    *Cooperate with other facility personnel to achieve goals and objectives as to quality, service, cost and profit. Report to immediate supervisor major problems and findings and results achieved with recommendations.
    *Advise and obtain the necessary approvals from appropriate management team, for potential organizational changes, actions that might require additional commitments, and the need for expenditures in excess of approved budget.
    *Assure project team adheres to established regulations, laws and rulings of government authorities (e.g., building codes, safety, etc.)
    *Carry out responsibilities in a professional, courteous manner at all times.

    Qualifications:
    Degree in architecture, design, construction preferred

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    Feb 08, 2009 8:42 PM GMT
    or this...HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    Property Manager
    British Embassy
    Washington, DC


    The British Embassy in Washington, DC is seeking a Property Manager to join our Facilities, Accommodations & Design team (FAD) to effectively manage and coordinate all activities and available resources in order to accomplish property objectives and maintain property values.

    Main Duties and Responsibilities:

    Serve as the liaison between FAD and the residents of Embassy owned or leased property.

    Maintain a positive customer service attitude, initiate, and implement policies/procedures to maintain resident communication.

    Assist in locating rental properties and lease negotiation.

    Perform property assessments to ensure that all physical aspects of the properties exterior and interior are functioning and in acceptable condition prior to occupancy and immediately upon resident vacating property.

    Develop, implement and manage preventative maintenance schedule.

    Coordinate and oversee general work orders and property upgrades with maintenance staff.

    Coordinate property furnishings with accommodations officer.


    Requirements:

    Minimum 2 years property management experience with a proven track record of working in a faced paced, customer service oriented environment.

    Must be currently licensed as a realtor in Washington DC, Maryland and Virginia.

    Excellent written and oral communication skills.

    Understanding of home mechanical systems.

    Ability to multi task and problem solve.

    Strong proficiency with Microsoft Office suite of programs, specifically MS Word, Excel, and Outlook.

    Experience with Oracle Financial and Access databases preferred.

    Must possess valid drivers license, insurance and personal vehicle.


    Under US State Department requirements, the Embassy may only employ, as non-diplomatic staff, persons who are US citizens
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:43 PM GMT
    1. Never give up.
    2. A bad economy is a great time for people with courage. Everyone else has given up.
    3. Never give up.
    4. Do the best you can and keep doing the best you can.
    4. A friend of mine had an older brother graduate college during the last big recession. The only work he could get was waiting tables, but that was somehow "beneath" him. He had 4 years of college under his belt. He's an attorney now.
    5. Never give up.
    6. Millions of people survived the Great Depression. Very, very few starved to death. You'll still have food, clothing and shelter.
    7. You're a damn kid (and a very attractive one at that), you have PLENTY of time to learn life skills.
    8. Part of my training for work was security training. The first thing you can NEVER afford to do in a crisis is panic. The worse the situation, the calmer you MUST be if you're going to survive. Burn the frustration and excess energy off at the gym or something.
    9. Life skills are constantly changing. It's not having them that counts, it's being able to learn.
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:43 PM GMT
    or this....

    Business Development and Sales : Architectural Channel

    A large, privately owned organization that provides luxury building products to architects and interior designers is looking for motivated and polished Sales Professional. You will be responsible for new business prospecting with architects, designers and luxury custom home builders in the DC, Maryland and Northern Virginia marketplace.

    In this exciting role you will provide sales support for all design, bidding and construction, working closely with architects and contractors to sell materials and close sales in the Central Virginia and Metro DC markets.

    A great attitude and ability to develop and finesse the relationship with potential long-term clients is key! Qualified candidates will demonstrate a strong understanding of the architectural and design/build process as well as direct sales experience with high end consumer goods. Experienced closers who demonstrate a passion for the architectural and design industry are encouraged to apply.

    Competitive compensation can be expected and excellent benefits are available.

    The BOSS Group places highly qualified creative, marketing, communications and interactive talent with leading employers across a range of industries. We have job opportunities nationwide, and local offices in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Richmond, Baltimore, Northern NJ and Dallas. Get to know us and the job search tools we provide at www.thebossgroup.com. You can also find us on Facebook-- become a fan to receive updates. The BOSS Group is an equal opportunity employer.
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:45 PM GMT
    czarodziej saidi have no life skills. i have no idea how to get my first apartment with no initial money after graduating, how to pay bills, juggle bills with groceries and with everything else daily life requires- i have no idea what i'll be doing in a year when i graduate- what's available to me job-wise...... none of that is taught in school......... will i be waiting tables? bar-tending? if so, what was the point of these 5 grueling years of earning a degree? i could have just dropped out of high school and bar-tended.

    Man, relax!

    All these things you're worrying about, they'll take care of themselves. Honestly. I was in the same place. Most people probably are. I didn't know the first thing about finding an apartment and paying rent... until I had to do it. And I just did it. It's not that big of a deal.

    And maybe you'll be waiting tables for a year after you graduate. You'll join the ranks of many who have, but who kept searching for their career job and eventually got it.

    You say you feel like a loser, but you haven't even got out into the workforce yet. Try being someone (hypothetically) with an advanced degree and 20 or so years of experience in their field who can't get hired on at Walmart on the night shift.

    You'll be fine, you just don't know it yet. And you're worrying for nothing. A big part of the stimulus package being negotiated now will include civil engineering expenditures. That means architects, builders, and yes, designers, will have plenty of employment.

    You can't speculate on how bad life might be in the future and then worry yourself sick about it. Most people seem to survive even in bad times. And you're obviously an intelligent person. That alone gives you an advantage.

    And if you take nothing else I've said to heart, remember this. You can be grateful that you were born in the United States, where even the poorest and least privileged have a standard of living far above those born in third world countries.

    Many intelligent and hard working people in other countries can't even hope to have one tenth of the privileged existence that you already have. You will never know what it's like to go hungry, to be unable to read, or be deprived of clean drinking water. You are very fortunate already, you just don't have the perspective to appreciate it.
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:49 PM GMT
    caslon:
    im not qualified for any of those, but thanks for looking. those the first two are architectural, and the third requires a lot of prior experience and aptitude i don't have yet. i've been trained more in retail, hospitality, and residential design- and i personally have put very little time or effort into developing corporate design skills as i have as much intention of doing that as i do of being an accountant. but i'd be interested in knowing where u found those cause there may be something governmental and dry that i would be suited for, and could use until i get to do what i really want. it'd be better than bar-tending. i hadn't thought of the more mundane jobs the government may have for me in the DC area here. i don't like them, but desperate times....


    i guess im not expecting any savory answers to this dilemma, just helpful ones- and this certainly qualifies..

    thanks caslon.


    wagon and global: that made me feel better- thank you
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:55 PM GMT
    Well Czarodziej I know right now life seems pretty bleak, but life also has a tendency to be very unpredictable. Often out of the worse situations come some of the most important growth opportunities. My first degree was in Psychology. I graduated in 1983 near the end of the worse economic downturn since the great Depression (until now that is). I could not find a job, but I did not want to live at home for personal reasons.

    I took a year off, worked a summer job running a fish stand then used the savings to live by myself in a bachelor apartment. I then spent the time trying to figure out what to do with my life. Psychology is of no use by itself unless you get a graduate degree. I decided to spend the spare time studying for my GMAT so I could get into MBA school. It turned out to be a good move. I got a degree that made me much more marketable, and started a career in Finance in Toronto.

    You are by nature a worrier, who has led a fairly sheltered existence. I would suggest starting to do things on your own as one goal you can work on over the next year. Every few months set a new goal (e.g. getting comfortable with doing your own finances). Life skills are things that are best learned through trial and error, not in an academic setting.

    As for the career you have chosen, don't get down too much. Also having more than one career in one's lifetime is not necessarily a bad thing. So keep your options open. Good luck.
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    Feb 08, 2009 8:58 PM GMT
    Oh, man, Dude...it's a tough economy right now, like you don't believe. Your worries are well-founded, but, you have to just keep plugging away.

    I turned down a 84K job this past fall so I could be at home with flex89 / Logan (I was working from home at the time for 80K), and to help him out and I wanted to be at home, etc, and the company we were working for tanked about 3 weeks later. The 84K jobs was at Verizon. We've been struggling since November. Over-qualified, or under-qualified. Folks on the fence. You have to just keep banging away, try to stay positive and be resourceful. Life, and the economy is cyclical.

    Professional jobs are tough right now. Everyone is taking a wait and see approach. I had another job I interviewed on that I was told I was the top candidate on,but, then, the job was put on hold.

    This afternoon, I'm entering financial data for my bud who, ironically, needs it done because his landscaping business is going chapter 7.

    Our consulting business has been sporadic, at best. We've been working on some web properties, but, it could be while before they make us money.

    Network, network, network. Literally, all you need is one acquaintance with money.

    In 2006, I did Chucky's Shirtless Computer Repair and made good money. I met the heir to the 22nd largest energy company in the U.S. He sponsored me in bodybuilding, but, he wasn't without his own issues, and, after I got my trophy, we went our seperate ways.

    Remember this: life can change in seconds.

    Keep your head up.

    If you start feeling real discouraged, here's something you can do: go ride public transportation. Your life is a breeze compared to the lives of some of those folks.
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    Feb 08, 2009 9:00 PM GMT

    Nothing more exciting that breaking out of your comfort zone and exploring the unknown!!! Boo!!!
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    Feb 08, 2009 9:01 PM GMT
    I guess I would just say....there are jobs out there. And remember you only need one job.

    One thing that I have observed is that college graduates dont know how to write resumes:

    Employers dont read long cover letters or resumes. At best they skim them. Usually, they just scan first for their key terms.

    I highly recommend designing your resume with a short Summary paragraph at the beginning ...just below your name and contact info. This Summary should be only a few...3 to 5, maybe 6 sentences. That highlights your skills/experience ...and since you are new to the work force, maybe your education (since your school seems preeminent and would carry weight).

    Edit this Summary for each job application....use key words from their advertisement to get the recruiters attention.

    The rest of the resume should be your experience/education/projects. This part of your resume should be able to stay static.....this will keep you from having to change much of your resume from job to job application.

    Just edit the summary to tweak your resume for each job.

    Use a standard resume format and typeface.
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    Feb 08, 2009 9:03 PM GMT
    Ride it out


    You're in the fourth of five years your not going to be hitting the job market for 18 months....

    This is a temporary thing only and people are acting like the world is going to end. If anything I personally think of it as a good thing, a kind of spring cleaning for all the mistakes the last generation made in running the world.


    Just do what you have to do... all the parents of my friends in college just stay in college another year take an MA/ MSc if that's an option.

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    Feb 08, 2009 9:06 PM GMT
    czarodziej saidcaslon:
    im not qualified for any of those, but thanks for looking. those the first two are architectural, and the third requires a lot of prior experience and aptitude i don't have yet. i've been trained more in retail, hospitality, and residential design- and i personally have put very little time or effort into developing corporate design skills as i have as much intention of doing that as i do of being an accountant. but i'd be interested in knowing where u found those cause there may be something governmental and dry that i would be suited for, and could use until i get to do what i really want. it'd be better than bar-tending. i hadn't thought of the more mundane jobs the government may have for me in the DC area here. i don't like them, but desperate times....


    i guess im not expecting any savory answers to this dilemma, just helpful ones- and this certainly qualifies..

    thanks caslon.


    wagon and global: that made me feel better- thank you


    i was searching: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wl/jobs/JS_BrandedSearch?brand=wj

    there is quite a lot of house renovation/expansion going on in this area.....at least, I see it going on in Alexandria. I guess trying to google architectural firms or construction companies in DC area, you might get some job leads not advertised.....let me go see what is the company do some extensive expansion on a house nearby
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    Feb 08, 2009 9:08 PM GMT
    thanx for the great advice all- especially for the shared personal backgrounds- im starting to feel a bit more calm... my mind just always tends to race to a worst case scenario...

    and yeah i've thought of staying in school- now's a good time for getting a masters... but then it'd be financially on my shoulders, i'd have to take loans, and graduate with debt- which i at least don't have to worry about right now... though i'd be more valuable then... so im not sure how viable or good an option it is but i'm mulling over it...

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    Feb 08, 2009 9:29 PM GMT
    (based on my understanding of my brother's career, and his friends whom I've had contact with over the years)

    As with anything to do with design (especially so for interior design / architecture) your portfolio of past works is what will speak volumes for your CV.

    Obviously starting fresh out of college with very few completed projects under your belt, your CV will look a little lacking... however if you are prepared to do the hard yards, it may not be a bad thing being a "newbie" right now.

    There is a lot of background / preparation work for any design project, some tasks being more menial and time consuming and less creative / artistic. If you can land a role doing some drafting or supportive work for a well-known / respected firm (essentially doing things less design-y more technical) you will eventually be able to contribute more ideas etc.

    You mentioned you are in retail, hospitality, and residential design. Use your network! Ask around if anyone is working on shopping mall, shops, hotel, or even home designs for the wealthy. As design is most often NOT a corporate type job, using your network of people you know - and people they know - is essential.

    I don't know if this is helpful, but best of luck! Chin up! It'll work out ok in the end. I graduated in 2003, soonish after the dot-com tech bubble. I was a lot more fortunate I could live at home for a while, but starting out is always scarey.

    Good luck!
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    Feb 08, 2009 9:36 PM GMT
    Oh and as for the life skills, you're clever enough you'll figure it out. Not everyone is taught how to cook, do laundry, look after their own finances, how to raise kids etc etc, but most people are observant enough to remember what other people / their parents did, and just take it from there.

    I lived at home until I was 25, after which I moved halfway across the globe by myself, fending for myself in London. Sure I had worked a while before that and built up a bit of a nest egg whilst living at home, but as with most things in life, learning by doing is the real way to learn icon_smile.gif

    And if you don't get things right the first time around, you can only improve right?

    As for that first apartment, well maybe you'll have to downgrade to couch surfing with friends or flat sharing for a while until things look better, right?
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    Feb 08, 2009 9:56 PM GMT
    The crappy economy was really the final straw for me that made me decide to get a second degree. Well, that and I can get a second BS in a little over a year. Or maybe Grad School, who knows. The happy thing for me, I'm old enough to be considered a "Non Traditional" student, so, the government gives me financial aid like crazy. So for now, I think I'm jjust gonna milk that dry, and when they quit giving me money, I'll quit going to school.

    As for waiting tables, if nothing else, it provides work experience, and possibly some work referenced. I managed a fast food resteraunt basically right out of HS. And the kids that worked for me and graduated college while I was manager used me as a referance all the time. Sure its an related field, but having someone say that you show up for work on time, work all day and can work with other people counts for a lot for employers.

    As for life skills, don't sweat, you figure it out eventually, In referance to getting your first apt, my advice would be to try to find someone who's already in a place at first so you don't have to worry about deposits and what not, and then save up for your own place if you want. I personally like living w/ roommates. Always someone to hang out with and talk to. Group dinners, and you get to meet a whole new group of people.
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    Feb 08, 2009 11:18 PM GMT
    Matterych saidhaving someone say that you show up for work on time, work all day and can work with other people counts for a lot for employers

    Very, very true. More than most people ever realize. I've gotten jobs before not based on how much experience I have (surely there were people more qualified), but based on my work ethic and the ability to work well with just about anyone.