That moment when the pilot says "hold my beer and watch this!"

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    Mar 27, 2016 7:01 PM GMT
    'Drunk' American Airlines pilot is arrested in front of stunned passengers at Detroit airport after failing TWO breathalyzer tests
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3510683/American-Airlines-pilot-arrested-Detroit-airport-failing-two-breathalyzer-tests.html?ito=social-facebook
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    Mar 27, 2016 10:40 PM GMT
    Oh, is that what the big "AA" on the tail stands for?
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    Mar 28, 2016 5:07 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidOh, is that what the big "AA" on the tail stands for?

    "Alcoholics Anonymous welcomes you on board. In the case of a flight emergency small liquor bottles will fall out of the ceiling above you. Please give me your full attention as I demonstrate how to use them... Ah! That was good!"
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    Mar 28, 2016 5:47 PM GMT
    An experience I had, related to one of their AA regional carriers, perhaps American Eagle over 20 years ago. Not involving alcohol I believe, but the flight kinda shook me up.

    It was a quick 90 minutes from Atlanta to Oxford, Alabama. The plane was a small commuter, I think a de Havilland Twin Otter. I was seated in the front row (if you can call 2 seats across total a row), with nothing but a curtain closing off the cockpit.

    With the curtain open I could see the instrument panel. Several round gauges were missing, with loose wires nearly hanging out from behind. I having the first seat from the cockpit I could read a yellow Post-It note stuck there, hand printed with: "Max says OK to fly".

    Wait a minute! Who the hell is Max, and why is flying this thing at issue? I thought the FAA required rigid pre-flight inspection and strict approval paperwork, not yellow stickie notes hung on instrument panels.

    I was getting ready to exit this thing before we took-off, but then the pilot and copilot arrived, and the plane got buttoned up. The two of them promptly threw their black raincoats down between their seats, which covered-up the engine throttles and other flight controls. What the f*** is this?

    As we did our taxi and then started down the runway for our takeoff they had to keep lifting their raincoats to access the throttles and other controls. I was almost breaking into a cold sweat. And then the entire flight was on instruments (I hoped none of the missing ones) because we were in rain clouds the whole time with zero visibility.

    Well, clearly we made it to Alabama. But that was the most tense flight of my life, and that includes many military ones.
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    Mar 28, 2016 11:21 PM GMT
    Well, I'm glad that they got him before he got behind the controls. That would have been worse for AA.

    Cheers,

    Sean
  • oldfart

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    Mar 29, 2016 2:44 PM GMT
    Navy pilots, no doubt.... ;-}
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    Apr 16, 2016 3:53 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidAn experience I had, related to one of their AA regional carriers, perhaps American Eagle over 20 years ago. Not involving alcohol I believe, but the flight kinda shook me up.

    It was a quick 90 minutes from Atlanta to Oxford, Alabama. The plane was a small commuter, I think a de Havilland Twin Otter. I was seated in the front row (if you can call 2 seats across a row), with nothing but a curtain closing off the cockpit.

    With the curtain open I could see the instrument panel. Several round gauges were missing, with loose wires nearly hanging out from behind. I noticed a yellow Post-It note stuck there, hand printed with: "Max says OK to fly".

    Wait a minute! Who the hell is Max, and why is flying this thing at issue? I thought the FAA required rigid pre-flight inspection and strict approval paperwork, not yellow stickie notes hung on instrument panels.

    I was getting ready to exit this thing before we took-off, but then the pilot and copilot arrived, and the plane got buttoned up. The two of them promptly threw their black raincoats down between their seats, which covered-up the engine throttles and other flight controls. What the f*** is this?

    As we did our taxi and then started down the runway for our takeoff they had to keep lifting their raincoats to access the throttles and other controls. I was almost breaking into a cold sweat. And then the entire flight was on instruments (I hoped none of the missing ones) because we were in rain clouds the whole time with zero visibility.

    Well, clearly we made it to Alabama. But that was the most tense flight of my life, and that includes many military ones.


    American Eagle never flew De-Havilland aircraft , their turbo-prop fleet were mostly ATR 42 and 72 .You might have flown on one of the oldest Beechcraft 99 but those were under the Wing West airlines operation which specialised on short flight in the South .