Once in the shadows, gay police now out and proud

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    Apr 11, 2016 5:22 PM GMT
    Dating a cop would be emotionally difficult, especially in today's hyper awareness icon_confused.gif



    http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2016/04/10/once-shadows-gay-police-now-out-and-proud/11XVuhuQ6AYNeO59fNrA4N/story.html


    Twenty-five years later, the New England Gay Officers Action League, or GOAL, has transformed in ways none of those officers imagined during that first fear-filled meeting. The group, which now has more than 300 members, has trained dozens of police chiefs on how to treat gay officers in their departments and has led police academy trainings to help recruits understand how to work with gay victims. When gay marriage was being debated in Massachusetts, members of GOAL said, they went to the State House to testify about the need to give partners of fallen gay officers the same benefits as those married to straight officers.

    “That’s a pretty amazing step from being in my living room wondering if we were going to make it through this,” said Horton, who is now deputy chief for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Transit Police.

    When the group formed in 1991, more than two decades had passed since the infamous Stonewall riots in New York, where gay men and women clashed violently with police in protest of years of persecution. But it was still dangerous for a police officer to come out as gay. There were accounts of cops who asked for backup on a dangerous call and received none because they were believed to be gay. Springfield police Officer Michael Carney, who was at GOAL’s first meeting, remembered one officer at his Police Academy graduation in 1982 who brought a man to a party, only to be sucker-punched by a veteran officer. Simmons said that before she could join the State Police, she had to take a polygraph test and was asked if she had ever had a same-sex partner.
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    Apr 12, 2016 7:24 PM GMT
    Gay cops, detectives, and the lawyers who work with them, have been organized in CA since the '70s. That's nothing against Boston's Best, but why dredge up all the bad experiences now? That was then, this is now, and there's no reason to not just keep bad memories alive, but to revive them once they're dead and gone. (And no, "journalistic license" will not suffice.) As far as dating cops, I've a few and they were all great guys. But then, I've never been one to let political rectitude govern my emotions, or any other part of me.