Does anyone else like to smell their armpits after a long day of work or after a workout?

  • Latinman27

    Posts: 192

    Apr 14, 2016 2:17 AM GMT
    I'm seen videos of men doing this and I think it's hot.icon_surprised.gif
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    Apr 14, 2016 3:09 AM GMT
    I don't LIKE to smell my pits, but it can tell me if I need a shower. I don't think a smelly guy is presentable, neither in the gay world, nor the straight circles in which we travel.
  • Allen

    Posts: 341

    Apr 14, 2016 5:55 AM GMT
    I've never needed to smell my arm pits to determine if I needed a shower after a workout. If you've had a legitimate workout, you need a shower.
  • mcbrion

    Posts: 305

    Apr 14, 2016 4:13 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI don't LIKE to smell my pits, but it can tell me if I need a shower. I don't think a smelly guy is presentable, neither in the gay world, nor the straight circles in which we travel.


    We'll…there ARE things called fetishes, and unless you want to say someone with a fetish is "unpresentable," then I feel differently. I like guys' smell. Maybe it has to do with playing football and sports where you get used to the smell of guys, but it doesn't bother me a bit. I mean, I wouldn't want to be sitting next to a guy radiating 3 feet in all directions, but if I was on a private date and we'd been running or hiking, I wouldn't automatically say "Go shower first."

    Some people think it's great that food smells, but don't like that a person does. And it's completely cultural. Americans are the most phobic about it, and from my traveling, Europeans are less concerned about it and in 3rd world countries where they don't shower everyday, I haven't heard much mentioned.
    So "smelly" is subjective - and cultural.
    Oh. And I like knowing what a guy's body odor is like. Some guys smell great. And some clean - and completely showered guys - have pretty awful smelling skin. So the idea that soap and water automatically make you smell "good"? Not in my experience after 30 years in San Francisco.
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    Apr 14, 2016 4:18 PM GMT
    I am not keen to do that ...
  • Looking9

    Posts: 31

    Apr 14, 2016 6:35 PM GMT
    I agree with mcbrion 100%......

    And yes, I do enjoy my man smell after a long day at work or a workout. Mind you, I do shower daily.
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    Apr 14, 2016 7:05 PM GMT
    You wouldn't be the first.

    14bhuzs.gif
  • yyzgwm

    Posts: 1

    Apr 14, 2016 7:50 PM GMT
    I love smelling my pits during a workout. Testosterone!

  • Apr 14, 2016 8:54 PM GMT
    Yea, all the time. Nothing turns me on more than the natural smell of a real man.
  • leanandclean

    Posts: 271

    Apr 14, 2016 9:20 PM GMT
    No.
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    Apr 14, 2016 10:52 PM GMT
    mcbrion saidAnd it's completely cultural. Americans are the most phobic about it, and from my traveling, Europeans are less concerned about it and in 3rd world countries where they don't shower everyday, I haven't heard much mentioned.


    You probably mean 3rd world minus South America.

    Brazilians (and most part of South America) are the most phobic in that regard. 4 showers a day are a normal occurrence there and it's not just because of the hot weather.
  • Coachfan

    Posts: 125

    Apr 15, 2016 1:30 AM GMT
    Yes, I sometimes do.
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    Apr 15, 2016 1:39 AM GMT
    Ummm,.....NO
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    Apr 15, 2016 2:46 AM GMT
    I fucking love it.
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    Apr 15, 2016 3:04 AM GMT
    IsigVinter saidI fucking love it.



    Same hold true for a hot hairy ass?

  • Apr 15, 2016 3:32 AM GMT
    GladiatorSam said
    Allen saidI've never needed to smell my arm pits to determine if I needed a shower after a workout. If you've had a legitimate workout, you need a shower.

    i agree


    LOL - that was really cute. the camera underwater was really cool.
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    Apr 15, 2016 3:45 AM GMT
    mcbrion said
    So "smelly" is subjective - and cultural.

    Agreed. I had a BF, that I've written about here before. He had a mildly furry chest that I would nuzzle against, and his man-scent (not strong or pungent, he showered daily) would make me weak. I've posted before how dancing nuzzling against him, in a gay bar where half the guys took their shirts off, including him, actually made me feel faint.

    But rancid gym sweat smell? That's a different category. Take a shower first. I like how a man smells, not how he stinks.
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    Apr 15, 2016 6:00 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI don't LIKE to smell my pits, but it can tell me if I need a shower. I don't think a smelly guy is presentable, neither in the gay world, nor the straight circles in which we travel.

    What a roundabout that must be. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Ariodante83

    Posts: 152

    Apr 15, 2016 8:04 PM GMT
    Sure I'll whiff out.
  • mcbrion

    Posts: 305

    Apr 16, 2016 7:07 AM GMT
    bachian said
    mcbrion saidAnd it's completely cultural. Americans are the most phobic about it, and from my traveling, Europeans are less concerned about it and in 3rd world countries where they don't shower everyday, I haven't heard much mentioned.


    You probably mean 3rd world minus South America.

    Brazilians (and most part of South America) are the most phobic in that regard. 4 showers a day are a normal occurrence there and it's not just because of the hot weather.


    South Amercia is heavily Roman Catholic and influenced by the thought of "cleanliness is next to Godliness." (I wonder who the (pardon the pun)) hell decided how God smelled. Pretty arrogant, not to mention, absurd, since nobody's ever met HIM.

    Washing every day started in the US back in the 50s, when tv advertisers created a market for soaps and deodorants and convinced the public they were less than presentable if they didn't bathe daily. Before that (tv advertising), I believe the norm was around 2 or 3 times a week. Houses weren't even built with showers 'til the late, LATE, 40s. And most houses not 'til the 50s. My family built houses and only the rich had showers prior to that. Then others decided they had to keep up with the joneses, and that, combines with the invention of tv and advertisers, created that neurotic mindset, which, to this day, I think is absurd. Dial soap is an invention of the 50s. Remember their slogan "Don't you use Dial soap? Don't you wish EVERYBODY did?" And that was it for the poor blue collar slob whose family had grown used to his smell. I still remember how my dad smelled after a day at work. Like a guy who'd worked all day, which is probably why I like the way men smell: reminds me of my childhood.

    And now, people make it a point of pride that they have NO scent, as though they are somehow more desirable than someone who does. Advertising has done a fantastic job of brainwashing people, in the same way that many, many women would never leave the house without applying makeup. All fallacy, but definitely Post-World War II fallacy. And it's ironic gay men have bought into it, but straight guys' wives are forever telling them they stink, which means the guy himself isn't all ferklempt about his smell. And among athletes and former athletes, among which I'd rank, (another pun) that wasn't even a blip on the horizon for us.
    I find straight guys much more relaxed about this than gay men. Thank God for that.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Apr 16, 2016 8:02 AM GMT
    Sometimes at the gym I'll get a was wiff of some major stench and I'll take a quick sniff and be like 'whew .,. not me'
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    Apr 16, 2016 5:18 PM GMT
    mcbrion saidSouth Amercia is heavily Roman Catholic and influenced by the thought of "cleanliness is next to Godliness." (I wonder who the (pardon the pun)) hell decided how God smelled. Pretty arrogant, not to mention, absurd, since nobody's ever met HIM.


    If that were true, the catholic Spanish and Portuguese would bath/shower as frequently as South Americans they colonized. Centuries later, they still don't.

    South Americans inherited their hygiene standards from the indigenous peoples from which they descend. These peoples were having frequent baths centuries before any European ever settled, centuries before American media.

    Showers were a staple in South American homes decades before it ever became mainstream in US and Canada, which are still behind when it comes to proper bathrooms.
  • mcbrion

    Posts: 305

    Apr 17, 2016 3:59 AM GMT
    Spanish and Portugese culture are quite different than South American culture, aren't they? From what I've observed, they are not obsessive about bathing. Plus, being at the Equator must play some part in it.

    And people bathe for different reasons. Not all of it related to fear of offending others.
    Here's one perspective:

    http://www.oneutah.org/2010/12/cleanliness-as-an-american-cultural-value/
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    Apr 17, 2016 3:07 PM GMT
    Bathing and cleanliness are two different things for some. In warm climates, people wash more frequently to rid their sweat and cool down. Showers tend to be cold. The Romans took frequent baths but with the collapse of their empire, Europeans bathed infrequently and were worried that too many baths were bad for their health. In Latin America, the use of a bidet is common in Brazil and Argentina, like it is in Italy. Yet in North America and Europe, we get by with dry toilet paper and insist that we are clean. Cleanliness is a construct of the mind.
  • Ariodante83

    Posts: 152

    Apr 17, 2016 4:31 PM GMT
    Longblack saidCleanliness is a construct of the mind.


    I've had landlords who applied this reasoning to their homes icon_eek.gif