controversial youtube video about black people in US.


  • Apr 14, 2016 6:13 AM GMT
    hope this don't cause a flame war. but i wanted to post a video that i really vibe to. i like what this guy has to say and i agree with him.




    i get called a sellout by some for agreeing with this guy but i don't care.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 6:33 AM GMT
    shortgreenfern saidhope this don't cause a flame war. but i wanted to post a video that i really vibe to. i like what this guy has to say and i agree with him.

    < iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ENGGalRcTxA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>

    i get called a sellout by some for agreeing with this guy but i don't care.

    Maybe not the best example to bring up now, but years ago Bill Cosby called out black America. And brought up the same thing.
    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5345290/ns/us_news-life/t/cosby-berates-blacks-abuse-failure-parents/

    Personally, I don't see why it's considered being a sellout, when you want to improve your quality of life.

  • Apr 14, 2016 7:13 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    shortgreenfern saidhope this don't cause a flame war. but i wanted to post a video that i really vibe to. i like what this guy has to say and i agree with him.

    < iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ENGGalRcTxA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>

    i get called a sellout by some for agreeing with this guy but i don't care.

    Maybe not the best example to bring up now, but years ago Bill Cosby called out black America. And brought up the same thing.
    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5345290/ns/us_news-life/t/cosby-berates-blacks-abuse-failure-parents/

    Personally, I don't see why it's considered being a sellout, when you want to improve your quality of life.


    thanks, man. to bad Cosby lost all credibility with all his date raping bullshit. but in addition to him there are lots of black men on youtube that feel the same way. i know i'm not the only one.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Apr 14, 2016 3:50 PM GMT
    I agree with the vid, and with you, OP, but I also think it is pretty damn hard to do if from birth, a child is raised in a bad environment. It says that this kid who knows nothing but squalor and abuse and neglect and violence should be able to magically lift himself out of that situation. Well, he just doesn't have the tools. That is what's doubly horrifying about the mass incarceration of black youths- the kids left behind with mothers who are equally ignorant will have zip chance at a nurturing childhood. Unless, someone finds a way to help that kid. I raised two kids in spectacular good fortune and even then, it wasn't easy to keep a kid on the right path. (I did succeed.)

    What the vid and you say are totally right but for it to really work, an army of caring adults need to step in and help the kids get it right. I work with a foundation that finds "at risk" kids and has them sign a contract to act right from 8th grade on and if they do, we pay for their college. And we provide a mentor. Works. You wouldn't believe the achievement of these kids. Head Start works, too. Anything to change the cycle of poor attitude and poor example helps. Kids need someone in their life to believe in them and guide them. They can't do it alone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 4:48 PM GMT
    Sad; my generation certainty holds on to their belief systems.

    For example; Tens of years go past and men are still are shooting up abortion clinics.

    Everyone is a genetic scientist and has a theory but dont see why reforms on race back in the 60's never took complete hold.
  • BloodFlame

    Posts: 1768

    Apr 14, 2016 6:21 PM GMT
    shortgreenfern saidhope this don't cause a flame war. but i wanted to post a video that i really vibe to. i like what this guy has to say and i agree with him.




    i get called a sellout by some for agreeing with this guy but i don't care.


    Yeah, I've had that same mentality for a very long time. About the cops thing, I found myself nodding my head in agreement. If you didn't do anything wrong, then you'll be okay. In all my life, I never once had a run in with the police. I never gave them any reason too. The only time I ever had a run in with a cop was when my brother and I were walking home past curfew and we didn't give the officer any attitude and he didn't give us any.

    I mean, sure it sucks that some black people get profiled but like he said, you can't really blame the officer because of statistics. It's just the way it is.

    And my brother and I would always get called "sell outs" or "trying to be white" just because we didn't speak in Ebonic or care about the "Thug life". It was so bad that it made me not like other black people for awhile (I was 16, I know better now lol).

    But yeah, good video. Awesome share.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 6:32 PM GMT
    Destinharbor saidI agree with the vid, and with you, OP, but I also think it is pretty damn hard to do if from birth, a child is raised in a bad environment. It says that this kid who knows nothing but squalor and abuse and neglect and violence should be able to magically lift himself out of that situation. Well, he just doesn't have the tools. That is what's doubly horrifying about the mass incarceration of black youths- the kids left behind with mothers who are equally ignorant will have zip chance at a nurturing childhood. Unless, someone finds a way to help that kid. I raised two kids in spectacular good fortune and even then, it wasn't easy to keep a kid on the right path. (I did succeed.)

    What the vid and you say are totally right but for it to really work, an army of caring adults need to step in and help the kids get it right.
    ...


    You're right it takes all of society but our society has become so fractured I don't see it getting better.

    What I learned at home was reinforced in the neighborhood. There were a thousand eyes on me and my friends. If we ever stepped out of line it got back to our parents before we ever got home. And when another parent told my parents I did anything wrong my parents sided with the adult. I remember the family that lived next door. The parents defended their kids to the bitter end - "My kid wouldn't do that" was their stock reply to any adult who confronted them about their kids' behavior. Guess what? Their kids all became drug addicts and high school dropouts. The rest of us went on to become productive members of society.

    What I learned at home was reinforced from the pulpit at church on Sunday and by the other parishioners. No stealing, no lying, no cheating. Not at home, not at school, and definitely not at church.

    What I learned at home was reinforced at school. If I got in trouble at school, I got it worse when I got home. My parents, and none of my friends' parents, threatened to sue anyone if they disciplined us. If I was ever roughed up by a cop my father would have laughted at me and called me a stupid asshole for not complying with an officer's directions and then he would have roughed me up some more.

    It takes a village but too many parents today are so afraid of fracturing their little darling delicate psyches they do not even discipline their own children much less care about anyone else's.



    Moral relativism was unheard of.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 7:08 PM GMT
    Personal "respons-a-damn-bility" is definitely important. There are so many demographics out there (LGBT community included) blaming ALL their problems on other people and jumping at any chance to correct everyone else while completely neglecting in-house issues. However, this guy comes off a bit preachy and critical. You have to know how to talk to people if you're genuine objective is to help improve things. If you finger point too hard, you will just make people defensive and create a hostile dialogue. He also oversimplifies quite a bit. As some have already stated, if you didn't know any better from a very young age because you didn't have people to show you the right way to go, you won't necessarily know if your behavior needs correcting or even how to correct certain behaviors. Even if you have been shown the right way to go and are a law-abiding citizen, it won't necessarily make you exempt from certain situations and treatment.

  • Apr 14, 2016 7:30 PM GMT
    lol! "respons-a-damn-bility" icon_lol.gif that was hilarious. i almost used that word in the title of this thread. i'm really glad we are able to chat about this. i was afraid i was gonna get attacked. what a relief. icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 7:38 PM GMT
    I was actually mocking him. I think if you're going to be super critical of others, you need to at least speak properly (no made up terms, slang, bad grammar, etc.). It might also help if he wasn't dressed like Lil Wayne. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 8:24 PM GMT
    xrichx saidPersonally, I don't see why it's considered being a sellout, when you want to improve your quality of life.

    I think in this particular situation with African Americans it's considered a sellout when you think that there isn't anything wrong with your behavior and it's a sellout when you're modifying your behavior in order to please the whites (or non-blacks).

    The same problem exists with blacks speaking AAVE, ebonics, or whatever you want to call it. It's a dialect of American English that since the beginning has been spoken by under educated, low brow, "trailer trash" but blacks who speak that way seem to think that it's a black English dialect unique to them and that everyone should just accept how they talk. And they think that people don't like it when they speak that way because blacks speak that way. No, sorry, it's trailer trash English.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 8:44 PM GMT
    CODY4U saidI was actually mocking him. I think if you're going to be super critical of others, you need to at least speak properly (no made up terms, slang, bad grammar, etc.). It might also help if he wasn't dressed like Lil Wayne. icon_lol.gif

    Then he might have come across as a sellout. Blacks who speak standard English and don't dress like that probably don't need to see that video.
  • SuntoryTime

    Posts: 656

    Apr 14, 2016 9:28 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    xrichx saidPersonally, I don't see why it's considered being a sellout, when you want to improve your quality of life.

    I think in this particular situation with African Americans it's considered a sellout when you think that there isn't anything wrong with your behavior and it's a sellout when you're modifying your behavior in order to please the whites (or non-blacks).

    The same problem exists with blacks speaking AAVE, ebonics, or whatever you want to call it. It's a dialect of American English that since the beginning has been spoken by under educated, low brow, "trailer trash" but blacks who speak that way seem to think that it's a black English dialect unique to them and that everyone should just accept how they talk. And they think that people don't like it when they speak that way because blacks speak that way. No, sorry, it's trailer trash English.


    Give us one peer-reviewed source to back this up.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 11:36 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    CODY4U saidI was actually mocking him. I think if you're going to be super critical of others, you need to at least speak properly (no made up terms, slang, bad grammar, etc.). It might also help if he wasn't dressed like Lil Wayne. icon_lol.gif

    Then he might have come across as a sellout. Blacks who speak standard English and don't dress like that probably don't need to see that video.


    Disagree there. A lot of black guys who complain about being called sellouts often fail to factor in that they're really obnoxious and insulting to other people of color. I've always spoken proper English and have yet to be called a sellout for it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 14, 2016 11:54 PM GMT
    SuntoryTime said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    xrichx saidPersonally, I don't see why it's considered being a sellout, when you want to improve your quality of life.

    I think in this particular situation with African Americans it's considered a sellout when you think that there isn't anything wrong with your behavior and it's a sellout when you're modifying your behavior in order to please the whites (or non-blacks).

    The same problem exists with blacks speaking AAVE, ebonics, or whatever you want to call it. It's a dialect of American English that since the beginning has been spoken by under educated, low brow, "trailer trash" but blacks who speak that way seem to think that it's a black English dialect unique to them and that everyone should just accept how they talk. And they think that people don't like it when they speak that way because blacks speak that way. No, sorry, it's trailer trash English.


    Give us one peer-reviewed source to back this up.


    So is Lumpy calling black people "trailer trash?"
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Apr 15, 2016 1:17 AM GMT
    SuntoryTime said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    xrichx saidPersonally, I don't see why it's considered being a sellout, when you want to improve your quality of life.

    I think in this particular situation with African Americans it's considered a sellout when you think that there isn't anything wrong with your behavior and it's a sellout when you're modifying your behavior in order to please the whites (or non-blacks).

    The same problem exists with blacks speaking AAVE, ebonics, or whatever you want to call it. It's a dialect of American English that since the beginning has been spoken by under educated, low brow, "trailer trash" but blacks who speak that way seem to think that it's a black English dialect unique to them and that everyone should just accept how they talk. And they think that people don't like it when they speak that way because blacks speak that way. No, sorry, it's trailer trash English.


    Give us one peer-reviewed source to back this up.


    you really dont need a peer-reviewed source. find a single example of a university educated black person who speaks like that in a professional setting. Further, you can find many pants sagging white yahoos that talk like that. Proof by contradiction.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2016 10:33 PM GMT
    another controversial video...

  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Apr 16, 2016 11:16 PM GMT
    Interesting but this is actually going to a certain demographic of black people.

    This doesn't speak to any of the black people that I know that live in the USA. It doesn't concern middle class and affluent blacks of which there is a sizeable population.

    And no one likes being talked down to so the only people that are going to agree with this are the people like the speaker who don't need the advice anyway.

    Yes personal responsibility is important but how you are raised and your community plays a big part in your upbringing.
    We have this hero expectation. That someone born into bad experiences should overcome and fight their way out. We love these stories, they are inspiring but why should anyone have to struggle to survive? Why not just make it easier for everyone?
    This hero myth is just a Darwinian survival of the fittest mentality in disguise.

    There are countries around the world where just surviving is not the main purpose of life. People are pretty equal and their lives aren't about overcoming a difficult upbringing.


    If someone calls you a sellout and get offended by that then in some way you have bought into how you are supposed to act.

    Having lived in the UK as a minortiy but also spent time in the caribbean and africa with majority black populations. I observed in majority black populations you will find no concept of what black people should behave like or do. In Jamaica they love country muisc as much as hip hop and reggae. You won't get called a sell out for liking rock music as there is no set way a 'black' person has to conduct themselves. People are free to do whatever they want.


    And anyone who things the effects of slavery don't exist should visit brazil and see how a country with more blacks than the USA keeps an entire population down and then has the cheek to tell you that racism doesn't exist.

    There are still after effects of slavery just as jews still have after effects from the holocaust.
    In fact every generation no matter what their ethnicity is influenced by their previous generations mentality.
    The generation that experienced the depression in the 1920s influenced the following generation, the baby boomers influenced generation X etc.
    There was a marketing study of how different generations have different buying behaviors based on their reaction to their parents behaviours.
    In science they have shown that ancestral memories reside in our genes.


    It would be wiser to understand how the effects of slavery can influence you so you can understand how subconscious beliefs impact your behaviour. Then you can truly be responsible. Personal responsibility + self knowledge gives you more power to take charge of your life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 17, 2016 2:43 AM GMT
    Wow, I never knew that Brazil had a history of slavery. Thanks for bringing that up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Brazil
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Apr 20, 2016 1:45 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidWow, I never knew that Brazil had a history of slavery. Thanks for bringing that up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Brazil


    You are welcome
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 20, 2016 2:57 PM GMT
    Slavery was practiced all over the Western Hemisphere - even by the indigenous peoples before the Europeans arrived.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 20, 2016 6:05 PM GMT
    LOVE and completely agree with the video as well! I too, being from the UK with Caribbean parents, and having spent a little time in the Caribbean, found it really strange when I came to this country a long time ago and saw how some people blame their misfortune on their ancestry. It's something I really find hard to comprehend, since anyone has the power to break a generational curse/cycle. Of course, I've also never been chastised for speaking with a British accent... In fact, it confuses the heck out of some people.

    I completely agree with the comment on Brasil. I have friends there and having been there multiple times, it's really sad that their government keeps everyone down, not just black Brasilians. Thanks for posting this, OP.

    Cheers,

    Sean
  • Aleco_Graves

    Posts: 708

    Apr 20, 2016 7:34 PM GMT
    +1
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Apr 20, 2016 7:40 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidSlavery was practiced all over the Western Hemisphere - even by the indigenous peoples before the Europeans arrived.


    It is still practiced today as is genocide, rape and pillaging. What ia your point?

  • Apr 20, 2016 7:53 PM GMT
    yer welcome. icon_smile.gif

    i agree, racism is pretty bad in south america but everyone wants to focus on america being so bad. i'll take living in the US over living in brazil or argentina or bolivia. plus i don't speak spanish so why bother. icon_lol.gif