Which Produces More Protein Waste: Meat, Fish, Eggs, Whey Protein Powder, Vegetable Protein Powder, Rice Protein Powder?

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    Apr 21, 2016 1:41 AM GMT
    When protein is ingested, protein waste products are created. Healthy kidneys have millions of nephrons that filter this waste. It’s then removed from the body in the urine.

    [url]https://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/dietary-protein-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/5302
    [/url]

    = = =

    Question: which produces more protein waste?

    Meat
    Fish
    Eggs
    Whey Protein Powder
    Vegetable Protein Powder
    Rice Protein Powder
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    Apr 21, 2016 1:05 PM GMT
    Adding eggs to the list
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    Apr 30, 2016 4:53 AM GMT
    Haven't had time to research this part of the human energy process. Would the body's ability to utilize available protein have an impact on the waste generated? Example, egg whites offer one of the most available sources of protein for the human body. About 100% of the egg white protein is used. Whereas with wheat and many grains, the human body can only utilize about 30-45% of the available protein. Tuna fish lands in the 90% range. And does the body process unused proteins differently? What happens to the ~65% of wheat protein that doesn't get utilized? Does it impact the kidneys and other filtering organs differently than waste from utilized protein?
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    Apr 30, 2016 2:57 PM GMT
    CrabNebula saidHaven't had time to research this part of the human energy process. Would the body's ability to utilize available protein have an impact on the waste generated? Example, egg whites offer one of the most available sources of protein for the human body. About 100% of the egg white protein is used. Whereas with wheat and many grains, the human body can only utilize about 30-45% of the available protein. Tuna fish lands in the 90% range. And does the body process unused proteins differently? What happens to the ~65% of wheat protein that doesn't get utilized? Does it impact the kidneys and other filtering organs differently than waste from utilized protein?


    Yes, CrabNebula, you have added another important element to the discussion: protein utilization. What isn't utilized is wasted; and, your pointing out utilization rates is information I'm seeking.

    Egg Whites: Most bio-available sources of protein at 100%
    Wheat Protein: 30-45%
    Tuna: 90%

    Please provide a source so I can take more pride in the information you're putting forth.

    Thank you,
    Stephenoabc/Steefen
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    May 01, 2016 7:46 PM GMT
    StephanOABC -

    Here are some links that have helped me better understand proteins and human metabolism:

    Royal Society of Chemistry
    http://www.rsc.org/Education/Teachers/Resources/cfb/excretion.htm

    Wikipedia - always a good starting point for both general info and links to more specialized info:
    [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein_%28nutrient%29[/url]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein

    U of Mass Amherst - this is on how we 'digest' food in a laboratory for analysis - might not be totally indicative of human digestion, but good chemical reactions/analysis:
    http://people.umass.edu/~mcclemen/581Proteins.html

    NIH resources:
    Text book-
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK21177/

    Natural proteins: Sources, isolation, characterization and applications-
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3841988/