Grammar,Spelling etc. Pet Peeves

  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Apr 26, 2016 11:28 PM GMT

    Which annoy you? I like to think i don't care about such things since i often neglect punctuation and love over using my precious commas, though there is no real hard and fast rules on such, motherfuckers.


    Though i will say one that really gets me is exercising demons. They exercised their demons, that team finally beat their hated rival exercising their playoff demons! Exercise? Did they take their demons out for a walk or something? Exorcise as in exorcism!

    Really i don't give a shit if someone uses the wrong there or to instead of too, it doesn't bother me two much but exercise? And i see it so often in speech and in print. I am no grammar Nazi, regular Nazi sure, but grammar Nazi i am not but that one bothers me for some reason.


  • ANTiSociaLiNJ...

    Posts: 1151

    Apr 26, 2016 11:41 PM GMT
    LOL

    That's pretty funny. I don't think I've ever come across that one.

    But now that you mention it:




    icon_lol.gif

    Even this short Men's Health article used it incorrectly:

    http://www.menshealth.com/health/exercising-your-demons
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    Apr 27, 2016 1:32 AM GMT
    I think they intentionally use "exercise" as a pun because it's actually about exercising.
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    Apr 27, 2016 1:52 AM GMT
    Also hadn't seen that one.

    I have many grammar and spelling pet peeves. I'm probably guilty of some that I don't know about.

    The ones I can think of off the top of my head are:

    Using "setup" as a verb but it's a noun. The verb is "set up." We set up his new computer. He has a nice setup.

    Using alternate when they should have used alternative. Alternate means to switch between to states; e.g., the light alternated between red and green. When you have different options those are alternatives; you didn't take the alternate route you took the alternative one.

    It's versus its, especially since there's a very easy mnemonic to remember. Its is like his and hers; possessive and no apostrophe, thus it's is the contraction of it and is.

    I kind of think the degradation of English has slowed down some since the internet and more people are reading stuff online. Although journalists are often the worst offenders.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 27, 2016 2:15 AM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    Better to excise your demons. Being non-corporeal was always a poor excuse for bumming a free ride.
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    Apr 27, 2016 2:54 AM GMT
    Lately, I have been getting pretty annoyed by the ubiquitous mis-use in the media of the words "levels" and "points" to, apparently, make vague innumerate references to quantities.
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:01 AM GMT
    A variant I ran across online the other day was someone who was going to exorcise his daemons. I don't know if he meant he was gonna purge his undeliverable email, or other incomplete computer processes, or what.

    Another one I encounter is "to" when the writer means "too", as in also, or as well. Seems few people know to write "too" anymore. Or possibly there's a shortage of the letter "O".
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:02 AM GMT
    The one that I caught here on this site today was:

    "Are there any gay pool party's in the major cities around the world that are good."

    sigh...
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:09 AM GMT
    desertmuscl saidThe one that I caught here on this site today was:

    "Are there any gay pool party's in the major cities around the world that are good."

    sigh...

    Yeah, that misspelling of "parties" is in the thread title, too, if it's the same one that I saw.

    But I didn't make any comment about it, instead just joined the thread to discuss the topic. What would be the point?
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:17 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    desertmuscl saidThe one that I caught here on this site today was:

    "Are there any gay pool party's in the major cities around the world that are good."

    sigh...

    Yeah, that misspelling of "parties" is in the thread title, too, if it's the same one that I saw.

    But I didn't make any comment about it, instead just joined the thread to discuss the topic. What would be the point?


    There is no point. That's why I was silent. This thread is about grammar and pet peeves.
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:23 AM GMT
    Exercising your demons isnt aloud.
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:26 AM GMT
    beneful1 saidExercising your demons isnt aloud.


    I'm in alinement with you on that one.

    However, you loose me when you use the word "exercising"...



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    Apr 27, 2016 3:33 AM GMT
    I miss the verb "befriend" now that Marc Zuckerberg has turned "friend" into a verb...

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    Apr 27, 2016 3:34 AM GMT
    I'm no grammar expert and English is my second language, but I do get annoyed too.

    A lot of people went from one extreme to the other when it comes to the use of "you and me" vs "you and I". I'm annoyed when I hear things like "between you and I."

    The misuse of the word "literally" is becoming so rampant too. "Literally" is now used in place of "very" instead of something to be taken literally as opposed to figuratively. icon_confused.gif
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:42 AM GMT
    beneful1 saidExercising your demons isnt aloud.


    IC wut U did their.
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    Apr 27, 2016 4:23 AM GMT
    Grammatical errors, misspellings, punctuation errors, typos, etc., don't annoy me--unless I see them in legal briefs, scholarly publications and the like (i.e., anything that purports to be "professionally" written). We can't all be grammarians, semanticists, and spelling bee contestants, so everything is forgiven. What do annoy me, however, are unintelligible rants coming from people who appear to be unhinged and/or unmedicated. Those are just unimaginably beastly.
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    Apr 27, 2016 4:45 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidLately, I have been getting pretty annoyed by the ubiquitous mis-use in the media of the words "levels" and "points" to, apparently, make vague innumerate references to quantities.

    That reminds me of another one, not grammatical but incorrect I think. Using percentages greater than 100. 200%, etc. Dunno if that bothers statisticians or mathematicians but it doesn't make sense since "per cent" means per 100.
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    Apr 27, 2016 4:47 AM GMT
    desertmuscl saidThe one that I caught here on this site today was:
    "Are there any gay pool party's in the major cities around the world that are good."
    sigh...

    And he's from London; usually the Brits are more careful about their language.
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    Apr 27, 2016 5:37 AM GMT
    My demons get really exercised whenever I hear anyone pronounce the world nuclear, as though it contained a second "u". as in Nuc-U-lar. This faux pas became a lot more popular from the usage of that idiot president from Connecticut (the one who moved to Texas, and thought he had to adopt more backwoods, uneducated speech patterns). Maybe he never went to class at Yale, just as he never went to his National Guard assignments.
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    Apr 27, 2016 6:12 AM GMT
    ^ Linguists call the process of swapping two sounds ("nuc-u-lar" vs. "Nu-cle-ar") metathesis. Another common example is "cumf-tur-buhl" (i.e. "com-fort-able"). Pronunciation of the English language is constantly evolving. I understand the Oxford Dictionary first noted the "nuc-u-lar" variant in 1943 so it's unfair to single out Bush. Other Presidents before him also used that pronunciation.
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    Apr 27, 2016 8:52 PM GMT
    YVRguy said^ Linguists call the process of swapping two sounds ("nuc-u-lar" vs. "Nu-cle-ar") metathesis. Another common example is "cumf-tur-buhl" (i.e. "com-fort-able"). Pronunciation of the English language is constantly evolving. I understand the Oxford Dictionary first noted the "nuc-u-lar" variant in 1943 so it's unfair to single out Bush. Other Presidents before him also used that pronunciation.

    Some of us want the rules unchanging and engraved in stone. For example my peeve about alternate and alternative; dictionaries are starting to give alternate and alternative the same meaning. The job of the people who maintain dictionaries is to record the current and accepted usage, not make rules.

    Which reminds me of another one that I really really hate, which is using gift as a verb. Women love that one. But dictionaries are now listing it as a verb.
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    Apr 27, 2016 9:05 PM GMT
    Using "perverse" to mean "perverted" (they have completely different meanings).

    Slightly more forgivable:
    Using "phenomena" to mean "phenomenon".
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Apr 28, 2016 11:37 PM GMT
    I'm like; I was like; he was like; we were like, etc.

    The 20 somethings are keen at destroying the language. These usages might even appear in the OED by now.

    They are almost as bad as I be, you be, he be, she be, we be, they be - a dialect way of conjugating the verb "to be."

    What English needs is the equivalent of the French Academy.

    Whatever their background might be, people who speak in this manner sound uneducated.

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    May 02, 2016 9:51 PM GMT
    Impact vs effect. You use impact when talking about something physically smacking into another thing. Effect means that it, well, affected it; "a change that is a result or consequence of an action or other cause." Of course dictionaries are now also listing for impact, "have a strong effect on someone or something."

    It's a lost cause, English is a fluid language and correct usage is determined by, well, usage, not some committee of fussy tight-assed fuddy duds.
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    May 02, 2016 11:07 PM GMT
    My personal favourite is " I seen " AHHHHHH!!!