WHAT DID THE REPUBLICAN PARTY DO TO KANSAS AND LOUISIANA? (an article to read and discuss)

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    May 01, 2016 3:22 AM GMT
    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/03/gop-must-answer-for-what-it-did-to-kansas.html?mid=twitter-share-di
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14295

    May 01, 2016 7:23 PM GMT
    Both conservative and liberal extremes do not work. It all has to be in sensible moderation or this country will remain indebted and in gridlock.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    May 01, 2016 8:00 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidBoth conservative and liberal extremes do not work. It all has to be in sensible moderation or this country will remain indebted and in gridlock.


    Indeed. I would just caution that when trying to evaluate "moderate", looking at democracies globally, and not isolating it to the US range.

  • May 01, 2016 10:56 PM GMT
    more than anything, all parties involved must work together to the goal of serving the people instead of letting petty bickering and 'party politics' get in the way. If each party spends the majority of its time thwarting the efforts of the other, neither will ever accomplish any of their goals in any notable way.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14295

    May 02, 2016 12:52 AM GMT
    thatotherotherguy saidmore than anything, all parties involved must work together to the goal of serving the people instead of letting petty bickering and 'party politics' get in the way. If each party spends the majority of its time thwarting the efforts of the other, neither will ever accomplish any of their goals in any notable way.
    Good luck trying to educate both democrats and republicans on this one. There are horrendously huge egos on Capitol Hill that dont like being deflated.
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    May 02, 2016 1:01 AM GMT
    Gathering My Thoughts - Stephenoabc

    "Demand that Donald Trump, John Kasich, and Ted Cruz explain why their tax policies won’t fail America in the same way they’ve failed the people of Kansas."

    Republican Governor of Kansas Sam Brownback:

    125px-Sam_Brownback_official_portrait_3.
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    May 02, 2016 1:04 AM GMT
    StephenOABC saidGathering My Thoughts - Stephenoabc

    "Demand that Donald Trump, John Kasich, and Ted Cruz explain why their tax policies won’t fail America in the same way they’ve failed the people of Kansas."

    Republican Governor of Kansas Sam Brownback:

    125px-Sam_Brownback_official_portrait_3.


    In 2010, the tea-party wave put Sam Brownback into the Sunflower State’s governor’s mansion and Republican majorities in both houses of its legislature. Together, they implemented the conservative movement’s blueprint for Utopia:

    They passed massive tax breaks for the wealthy and repealed all income taxes on more than 100,000 businesses.

    They tightened welfare requirements, privatized the delivery of Medicaid, cut $200 million from the education budget, eliminated four state agencies and 2,000 government employees.

    In 2012, Brownback helped replace the few remaining moderate Republicans in the legislature with conservative true believers.

    The following January, after signing the largest tax cut in Kansas history, Brownback told the Wall Street Journal, “My focus is to create a red-state model that allows the Republican ticket to say, 'See, we've got a different way, and it works.' "

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    May 02, 2016 1:07 AM GMT
    What do you think happened with this Reagonomics initiative?
    What do you think happened with this Trickle Down Theory initiative?
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    May 02, 2016 1:13 AM GMT
    StephenOABC saidWhat do you think happened with this Reagonomics initiative?
    What do you think happened with this Trickle Down Theory initiative?


    Louisiana has replicated these results. When Bobby Jindal moved into the governor’s mansion in 2008, he inherited a $1 billion surplus.

    When he moved out last year,

    Louisiana faced a $1.6 billion projected deficit.

    Part of that budgetary collapse can be put on the past year's plummeting oil prices.

    The rest should be placed on Jindal

    220px-Bobby_Jindal_August_2015.jpg

    passing the largest tax cut in the state's history and then refusing to reverse course when the state's biggest industry started tanking.
    Jindal's giveaway to the wealthiest citizens in the country's second-poorest state cost Louisiana roughly $800 million every year.

    To make up that gap, Jindal

    slashed social services,
    raided the state’s rainy-day funds, and
    papered over the rest with reckless borrowing.

    Today, the state is scrambling to resolve a $940 million budget gap for this fiscal year, with a $2 billion shortfall projected for 2017.
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    May 02, 2016 1:17 AM GMT
    What has happened to these states should be a national story; because we are one election away from it being our national story.
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    May 02, 2016 1:23 AM GMT
    Ted Cruz claims his tax plan will cost less than $1 trillion in lost revenue over the next ten years.

    Leaving aside the low bar the Texas senator sets for himself

    — my giveaway to the one percent will cost a bit less than the Iraq War!

    Cruz only stays beneath $1 trillion when you employ the kind of “dynamic scoring” that has consistently underestimated the costs of tax cuts in Kansas.

    Under a conventional analysis, the bill runs well over $3 trillion, with 44 percent of that lost money accruing to the one percent.

    John Kasich’s tax plan includes cutting the top marginal rate by more than ten percent along with a similar cut to the rates on capital gains and business taxes. Even considering Kasich’s appetite for Social Security cuts, his plan must rely on the same supply-side voodoo that Kansas has so thoroughly discredited.

    [Donald Trump] As for the most likely GOP nominee, even with dynamic scoring, his tax cuts would cost $10 trillion over the next ten years, with 40 percent of that gargantuan sum filling the pockets of Trump’s economic peers.

    If any of these men are elected president, they will almost certainly take office with a House and Senate eager to scale up the “red-state model.”

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said of Brownback’s Kansas, “This is exactly the sort of thing we (Republicans) want to do here, in Washington, but can’t, at least for now.”

    Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s celebrated budgets all depend on the same magical growth that has somehow escaped the Sunflower State.
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    May 02, 2016 1:28 AM GMT
    The rise of Trump has forced many conservatives to reckon with the moral odiousness of Nixon’s Southern Strategy — a blueprint for GOP electoral success that relied on coded appeals to white racial animus.

    Interesting: details on why people saw through Nixon.

    On NPR, Trump was compared to Wallace.

    George Wallace's 1963 Inaugural Address was delivered January 14, 1963, following his election as Governor of Alabama.[1] Wallace at this time in his career was an ardent segregationist, and as Governor he challenged the attempts of the federal government to enforce laws prohibiting segregation in Alabama's public schools and other institutions. The speech is most famous for the phrase
    "segregation now,
    segregation tomorrow,
    segregation forever"


    which became a rallying cry for those opposed to integration and the Civil Rights Movement.
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    May 02, 2016 1:31 AM GMT
    When the GOP's economic platform decimates two U.S. states ...

    That's their report card. Voters have to be the parents!
    The leaders of the Republican Party have to be the parents held accountable.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14295

    May 02, 2016 1:33 AM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    StephenOABC saidGathering My Thoughts - Stephenoabc

    "Demand that Donald Trump, John Kasich, and Ted Cruz explain why their tax policies won’t fail America in the same way they’ve failed the people of Kansas."

    Republican Governor of Kansas Sam Brownback:

    125px-Sam_Brownback_official_portrait_3.


    In 2010, the tea-party wave put Sam Brownback into the Sunflower State’s governor’s mansion and Republican majorities in both houses of its legislature. Together, they implemented the conservative movement’s blueprint for Utopia:

    They passed massive tax breaks for the wealthy and repealed all income taxes on more than 100,000 businesses.

    They tightened welfare requirements, privatized the delivery of Medicaid, cut $200 million from the education budget, eliminated four state agencies and 2,000 government employees.

    In 2012, Brownback helped replace the few remaining moderate Republicans in the legislature with conservative true believers.

    The following January, after signing the largest tax cut in Kansas history, Brownback told the Wall Street Journal, “My focus is to create a red-state model that allows the Republican ticket to say, 'See, we've got a different way, and it works.' "

    Despite the fact that Governor Brownback cut the size of the Topeka bureaucracy, he went too far with tax cuts. His spending cuts did not keep up with the tax cuts and this is where he and his fellow conservative republicans goofed horrendously. The state of Kansas was basically starved of necessary revenue which has put the Sunflower State in a deep fiscal hole. Their intentions were good but the end results are a disastrous failure because somewhere along the line they failed to figure in required expenses and that all added up to a horrendous budget deficit. Too many tax cuts.
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    May 02, 2016 1:48 AM GMT
    thatotherotherguy saidmore than anything, all parties involved must work together to the goal of serving the people instead of letting petty bickering and 'party politics' get in the way. If each party spends the majority of its time thwarting the efforts of the other, neither will ever accomplish any of their goals in any notable way.


    such a cute thing to say ; )
  • rdberg1957

    Posts: 661

    May 02, 2016 1:06 PM GMT
    There was a time after World War II this was mostly true. Democrats and Republicans cooperated to a great degree. It wasn't a love fest, but there was some respect between the parties. They created the EPA, funded science research, built the freeway system. There was bipartisanship before the Republican party became extreme. When the Democratic party nominated liberals, they got pummeled at the polls. That's why I didn't support Bernie Sanders even though I like him.

    The Republican Party is in deep trouble because they are about to nominate Trump even though many Republicans won't lift a finger to help him. Trump gained access by attacking all the people he would need to help him. There aren't enough Trump supporters to win many states in the electoral college. New York and California will go to Hillary.

    Neither the very conservative Tea Party, nor the Trump supporters have a future. Even though the Republicans are self-destructing, they have a way of rising from the ashes to wreak more havoc on the public which still wants to give them one more chance.

    Neither party is equipped and ready to deal with what is to come. The United States became a superpower after World War II by funding education, science, and technology. There was some cooperation between private industry and government. Basically Roosevelt left us with a mixed economy.

    Republicans such as Brownback want to dismantle government programs, not because they don't work, but because they do. Of course they don't work perfectly and there are abuses, but the overall verdict is that many government programs have benefitted large portions of the electorate. MEDICARE has saved lives. People used to die younger.

    Republicans are a minority party and by dismantling government programs, they can eliminate Democrats from power, They attack unions, public schools, science. Everything except football. They attack what made America great. We have Trump who is promising to make America great again, not by building anything useful. He only promises to build a useless wall.

    The current version of the Republican party only brings destruction. They can't help themselves. How can they help the rest of the country? Name one thing that the modern Republicans have paid for and built that had great value to the country. If you put people in charge who hate government as much as they do, don't be surprised if they wreak havoc.

    I am not someone who loves government at all times. We need a functioning independent judiciary to prevent government overreach. Republicans can't even give us that. Post Reagan Republicans can't admit that government is ever useful other than the military. Over the last 30 years, Republicans have grown more radical and destructive, wasting resources and dismantling progress.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14295

    May 02, 2016 1:14 PM GMT
    The whole trouble with the GOP today is not only their domination by narrow minded bible thumping screwballs but also their endless love affair with tax cuts and not gradually done tax cuts but the destructive slash and burn tax cuts. The governor of Kansas moved way too fast with tax cuts and he cut taxes too deep before looking at the bigger picture and seeing where tax revenue is needed to avoid a deficit.
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    May 02, 2016 8:42 PM GMT
    Okay, now, let's use the Kansas example because Kansas' report card is skewed by the downturn in oil to a lesser degree than Louisiana's report card (unless someone objects saying Kansas is as reliant on oil as Louisiana is).

    The Kansas Trickle Down Report Card

    Backers of the budget touted projections from the Kansas Policy Institute, which predicted it would generate $323 million in new local revenues by 2018. But marginal gains at the municipal level were dwarfed by the $688 million loss that Brownback’s budget wrought in its first year of operation.

    Meanwhile, Kansas’s job growth actually trailed that of its neighboring states.

    With that nearly $688 million deficit, the state had bought itself a 1.1 percent increase in jobs, just below Missouri’s 1.5 percent and Colorado’s 3.3.

    Those numbers have hardly improved in the intervening years.

    In 2015, job growth in Kansas was a mere 0.1 percent, even as the nation’s economy grew 1.9 percent.

    Brownback pledged to bring 100,000* new jobs to the state in his second term; as of January, he has brought 700.


    What’s more, personal income growth slowed dramatically since the tax cuts went into effect. Between 2010 and 2012, Kansas saw income growth of 6.1 percent, good for 12th in the nation; but from 2013 to 2015, that rate was 3.6 percent, good for 41st.

    Meanwhile, revenue shortfalls have devastated the state’s public sector along with its most vulnerable citizens.

    Since Brownback’s inauguration, 1,414 Kansans with disabilities have been thrown off Medicaid.

    In 2015, six school districts in the state were forced to end their years early for lack of funding.

    Cuts to health and human services are expected to cause 65 preventable deaths this year in Sedgwick County alone.

    In February, tax receipts came in $53 million below estimates.

    Brownback immediately cut $17 million from the state’s university system.
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    May 02, 2016 8:47 PM GMT
    Let Kansas eat cake: suffering and prayers?
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    May 02, 2016 9:52 PM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    StephenOABC saidWhat do you think happened with this Reagonomics initiative?
    What do you think happened with this Trickle Down Theory initiative?


    Louisiana has replicated these results. When Bobby Jindal moved into the governor’s mansion in 2008, he inherited a $1 billion surplus.

    When he moved out last year,

    Louisiana faced a $1.6 billion projected deficit.

    Part of that budgetary collapse can be put on the past year's plummeting oil prices.

    The rest should be placed on Jindal

    220px-Bobby_Jindal_August_2015.jpg

    passing the largest tax cut in the state's history and then refusing to reverse course when the state's biggest industry started tanking.
    Jindal's giveaway to the wealthiest citizens in the country's second-poorest state cost Louisiana roughly $800 million every year.

    To make up that gap, Jindal

    slashed social services,
    raided the state’s rainy-day funds, and
    papered over the rest with reckless borrowing.

    Today, the state is scrambling to resolve a $940 million budget gap for this fiscal year, with a $2 billion shortfall projected for 2017.

    Louisiana has an oil dependent economy. Jindal isn't responsible for low oil prices, Obama is responsible. Who normalized relations with Iran...Obama. Iranian oil is causing the glut.