Understanding Donald Trump supporters

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 05, 2016 9:45 AM GMT
    Ok guys I know there have been millions of Trump threads already, but now that he's the Republican candidate, I'd really like to understand what drives so many people to support him.


    So, if there are any Trump supporters on here,could you elaborate on the reasons behind your support and your expectations if he were to be elected ?


    Non-supporters, what do you think are the main reasons for his success ?

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    May 05, 2016 12:33 PM GMT
    I am not a Trump supporter, but I can tell you definitively from my experience providing pro bono legal representation to several "ethnic" nonprofit organizations that some Trump supporters are focused exclusively on one issue: immigration. Some of those who came to the US legally believe that undocumented (aka "illegal") immigrants should not be allowed to stay in the US and should not be rewarded for violating immigration laws. I don't agree with this position, but I can also understand why legal immigrants who followed the law (i.e., quotas, intrafamily petitions, etc.) and waited their turn to come to the US would support Trump on this issue alone.
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    May 05, 2016 1:39 PM GMT
    I found one Trump supporter. I bet many look just like this.

    16114611694_fdfd8a97c1.jpg
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    May 05, 2016 2:06 PM GMT
    Im an not voting for Trump.
    His support is huge in the under educated under employed segment of the population. The recession is still a big issue for these people. They have lost a lot and it dosnt look like their lives will bounce back soon enough. I am not snug enough to diss their situation and have to say i dont see how we can make it with out them.

    Both my husband and myself were unemployed and under employed during the great recession. We had some savings, no debt and careers. We are actually much better off now than before George Dubya. We did it our selves.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19133

    May 05, 2016 2:42 PM GMT
    I'm going to wait until after the Trump/Clinton debates and other revelations that may come into play during the general camping before I decide for sure, but at this moment I am definitely for Trump.



    Why?

    1) Biggest reason is that he is not a politician, he's very fiscally conservative, and I really believe he will force some needed change in Washington D.C. The status quo has not been working for years. Time to do something different that shakes things up.

    2) The Wall -- Living in Arizona, I am all too aware of the illegal immigration problem into this country. We want to welcome one and all, but they have to enter the country "Legally" -- we have to know WHO is coming in, WHY they are here, and WHERE they are going, and for how long do they plan to stay. If we don't have borders, we don't have a country. If we don't know who is coming into our country, and why, Americans are less safe. Immigration, however, is only one of the problems facing us at the border in which The Wall could help stop. The other is the massive influx of illegal drugs flowing across the border, not to mention the people trafficking these drugs in.

    3) Foreign Policy -- I like Trump's Reagan-esque "Peace Through Strength" mindset, building up our military so strong that hopefully we never have to use it. I like that Trump wants to renegotiate NATO so that it is more in line with the world as it is today, NOT how it was nearly 50 years ago, and that it takes into account modern methods to fight the very real and increasing threat of radical islamic terrorism. Other countries need to start paying an equal (or at least fair) share of the burden of keeping the world safe. I also like that Trump seems to have a willingness to reach out to Putin and other major world leaders to find that common ground that can lead to a more peaceful world through mutual cooperation and respect.

    4) Israel -- I like that, while Trump supports Israel 100%, but that he is willing to take a "neutral" stance when negotiating any up until now seemingly unnegotiable peace treaty between Israel and Palestine.

    5) Trade Deals -- Virtually every trade deal the US has with other countries leaves Americans with the short end of the stick. Billion dollar trade deficits across the board are draining our country, costing us jobs, and increasing our debt. These must be renegotiated with a 2-way street Win/Win mentality. Tax incentives and other incentives to keep American companies in the US and bring back the value and pride of "Made in the Usa"

    6) Rebuilding Our Infrastructure -- I can think of no candidate better suited to address the dire need we have of rebuilding and renovating everything from roads and bridges to airports and public schools than Donald Trump.

    7) LGBT Issues -- I feel that Trump will be more of an advocate to these issues than anyone else who ran for POTUS in the GOP. I don't believe he has any problem whatsoever with "Gay Marriage" and he was the only candidate on the GOP side who spoke out against the transgender bathroom laws in states like North Carolina.

    Having said all of that....I still want to see how Trump handles himself during the general election, how he performs in the debates, and see if he can prove that he is capable of handling such a huge task of being President. We know Hillary Clinton has the experience and qualifications for the job, but there are serious questions about her on other levels.

  • May 05, 2016 5:01 PM GMT
    1) Biggest reason is that he is not a politician...

    My Dad supports Trump too, and this is one of the reasons he does, but with that logic we should start hiring airline pilots with no experience, or training to fly planes.

    Im sorry if this offends Trump supporters, but I wouldn't want someone with no experience running our country. That's foolish.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19133

    May 05, 2016 5:28 PM GMT
    No_Hookups_Steve said
    Sorry, if this offends Trump supporters, but I wouldn't want someone with no experience running our country. That's foolish.



    No offense taken, but with all due respect, to say that Trump has "no experience" is laughable. Trump has been running a multi-national company and dealing with politicians most of his adult life. He has more worldly experience in his pinky finger than many of the other GOP candidates had their entire career. The mere fact that he has actually managed to accomplish something of historic proportions in US political history with "no experience" is a testament to what he is capable of accomplishing. Granted, Trump has no experience in Government, but you can be sure that he will surround himself with people who do.
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    May 05, 2016 6:28 PM GMT
    ^+1! I support Trump not only because he alone isn't afraid to speak up without being bound by political rectitude, but because his ideas make sense, and not just the common kind. He stands for the rule of law, not legal relativism - query how any lawyer who took an oath "to uphold the constitution and the laws of the US and [his] state" can blithely ignore and violate that oath by aiding and abetting illegal aliens under the guise of pro bono publico work that does not benefit the public, but only its law-breaking component - which is sorely needed in light of the contempt for the law shown over the past 8 years by Obama and his tools, his AGs chief among them.

    But Trump's no-nonsense stance on illegal immigration and illegal aliens is not the only reason I support him. I reject the claim that it takes someone w/ government or political experience to be president; in many cases, that "experience" is not at all desirable: in too many, it's all these people have. A businessman, OTOH, succeeds by being a skilled salesman and negotiator, with a mind for practical solutions, not the impractical Diktats we've had thrown at us for the past 8 years. Trump will be a breath of fresh air throughout the corridors of power in DC, just as he has proven himself to be in the RNC.

    I also like Trump's style. I do not see it as bullying, but giving tit for tat, and again, telling it like it is. Re: Billary's fit of pique after he rightly called her on playing the women's card: that's all she's ever done from Day One, with her frequent calls for "It's time for a woman" in this, that and every other thing w/o regards to competency, which I - and Trump - hold to be the sole determiner of who should occupy positions of merit or power. Given the lack of respect for the US in the international arena as a direct result of Obama's ignorance, inexperience, and naive pusillanimity, we need such a person who will take foreign leaders to task when they cross our interests, instead of bowing or kowtowing to them. As far as Trump's being trigger happy, sorry: I remember when that card was played on Goldwater in 1964, and am not going to suffer it to be led again.

    I could go on, but I won't because I think this post adequately responds to the OP's request; c.f., the other, carping ones, which belong in threads of their own. I will be doing everything I can between now and election day to help Trump win the WH, and I encourage everyone to look closely at him and consider doing so as well.
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    May 05, 2016 7:04 PM GMT
    Some are not better off after the ACA--and then to penalize people more than $100 for not having insurance: President Hussein and his protégé Clinton punishes you for being poor.
  • Looking9

    Posts: 31

    May 05, 2016 7:23 PM GMT
    I agree 100% with MGINSD and CuriousJockAZ, well said guys. Unfortunately, all the people who not support Donald Trump will never get this.

    To those who dislike Donald Trump, please reread what CuriousJockAZ and MGINSD with an open mind.

  • May 05, 2016 7:32 PM GMT
    You can vote for Bernie still by writing him in on your ballot if his name isn't on it. Most people don't know this.
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    May 05, 2016 7:59 PM GMT
    B3d4G9s.gif
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    May 05, 2016 8:04 PM GMT
    Jobs have been lost to outsourcing and illegal immigration. You can't expect people to be cool with something that's limiting opportunities for them as actual citizens. This is obviously an issue that had gone unaddressed long before Trump even announced he was running. Media pins way too much on Trump when he's far from the root of the issues. He's giving a voice to people who feel overlooked. The mistake the Anti-Trump crowds made was ignoring the public. He simply stepped up and spoke to them. Now they're speaking through their votes. I won't be voting for Trump, but I get some of the frustration and why people are choosing him.

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    May 05, 2016 8:57 PM GMT
    CODY4U saidJobs have been lost to outsourcing and illegal immigration. You can't expect people to be cool with something that's limiting opportunities for them as actual citizens. This is obviously an issue that had gone unaddressed long before Trump even announced he was running. Media pins way too much on Trump when he's far from the root of the issues. He's giving a voice to people who feel overlooked. The mistake the Anti-Trump crowds made was ignoring the public. He simply stepped up and spoke to them. Now they're speaking through their votes. I won't be voting for Trump, but I get some of the frustration and why people are choosing him.




    "Jobs have been lost to outsourcing and illegal immigration", yes but this is mainly the "fault game" played by Corporate America and Government. (on the same partisan party lines, rep v dem. The game, tit for tat. Corporate America is greedy, they play there own game of stagnate wage caps, that is why american 'workers' don't get ahead in life (you are a slave to debt that you can never get out of, wages are kept subdued for this purpose). If corporate america had its full control over government, which is really what is going on here, a fight for control between government, religion and corporate America, they would be able to "reset the wage bar" every time without consequence, which only helps themselves to larger profit margins. There is an old saying in business, "the fox guarding the hen house". The US is not China, not yet anyway

    I understand 'regulations' because that is my own line of work but you cant just throw the baby out with the bath water. Part of regulation is check and balance to make sure laws, rules and regulations are followed in business. Without someone unbiased 'guarding the hen house' what do you have? Did we not learn anything in school or college about cheating your way thru life? This is my viewpoint about the republicans and most in corporate America.

    Part of the Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln, addresses the fact government is for the people, by the people. Not for religion, by religion, not corporations, by corporations (although Hobby Lobby case suggests corporations are now "people" which still sounds silly). This is why I point fingers at big US business, they think they are "people" who should run the united states government and Donald Trump falls into this, scary, category. In my youth (70's-80's), an average CEO's pay was $150,000 yearly, around the same amount as a doctor or lawyer. Todays CEO's yearly pay is at min, $1 Million, plus unlimited company stock options. What is that, 10,000%?

    Meanwhile the average wage of workers has remained flat. Companies today want to pay me what I was making 20 years ago. Instead of paying me more, deservedly, they pick a 'younger' person or foreign person that will work for their low set wage cap. This is why $15 hr min wage is such a big deal now. Its governments way of balancing the pay scale that has been oppressed for so long, by the greedy "job creators" who over decades have lined their own pockets by minimizing pay for labor growth

    I don't want CEO Trump, or any war pig republican running our 'free country' ever again icon_lol.gif

    800px-Government-Vedder-Highsmith-detail
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    May 05, 2016 9:23 PM GMT
    No_Hookups_Steve said1) Biggest reason is that he is not a politician...

    My Dad supports Trump too, and this is one of the reasons he does, but with that logic we should start hiring airline pilots with no experience, or training, to fly planes.

    Sorry, if this offends Trump supporters, but I wouldn't want someone with no experience running our country. That's foolish.


    The current POTUS was only in the US Senate for three years before becoming prez. Before that he was a community organizer and law professor.

    The prez (who ever he is - Repub or Demo) is just a figure head and mouth piece for his party bosses who really pull the strings.
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    May 05, 2016 9:36 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidB3d4G9s.gif

    Not sure what the meaning is behind this, but if it's to belittle bricklayers, if not other blue collar workers, you should know that Winston Churchill enjoyed bricklaying in his spare time - and became quite good at it, in addition to all his other talents and achievements.
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    May 05, 2016 9:52 PM GMT
    Thanks for giving such detailed responses.

    I am curious though as to why there’s such a big focus on immigration.

    Although there is obviously a problem with illegal immigration in the US, aren’t the ramifications of it on the American economy exaggerated by Trump? I feel like Trump uses the issue of illegal immigration as an excuse to develop a populist xenophobic rhetoric that wins over voter by making them feel threatened.

    It’s the oldest trick in the world : At a time of crisis, always blame the outsider, the foreigner. It’s a strategy that’s commonly used by far-right parties such as le Front national ( led by Marine Le Pen) in France. And of course people are willing to convince themselves of these (non)-arguments, because it’s a lot easier to find scapegoats and have a one-dimensional understanding of things than it is to accept the idea that many factors come into play to explain the current state of the economy and immigration is but one of these multiple factors.

    What’s funny is that Trump and similar politicians say that what they’re doing is subversive and anti-politically correct when really they’re just telling people what they want to hear, they’re just preaching to the choir, and disguising it as the “truth”.
    Ultimately, I see it as pure manipulation and dishonesty.

    So, considering that Trump has relied so heavily on these tactics during his campaign, I don’t see how he can be trusted to be president.

    What do you make of this ? Do you recognize that Trump has been fear mongering all through his campaign? Does it matter to you or do you just brush it off as a politician’s dirty but necessary work ?
  • rip12

    Posts: 63

    May 05, 2016 10:56 PM GMT
    this is almost comical - although i see the initial poster is not from the u.s.a. so perhaps it would be hard to understand - the world economic crisis the world has gone through has affected different people differently in different parts of the world

    im not into making predictions and wont do so here

    since the inception everyone (particularly the media and the power "elite" in washington) have underestimated the anger that is out in the general american population- it is palpable and has been for quite some time

    trump is clearly a populist - he is not "owned" by anyone and has brought up important issues that would never have been brought up if it werent for him

    the media and the power elite will stop at nothing to discredit him and, i suspect, this time its not going to work

    i would add that in their effort to discredit they have successfully demeaned at least half of the american population in their name calling and sarcastic remarks about anyone who dares admit to supporting trump

    it only fuels the fire - now the suspicion is that they are running scared for fear of losing their "power" because trump, again, is owned by no one

    if you dont like him dont vote for him - its really pretty simple

    again, im not into predictions - but i wouldnt be at all surprised if he doesnt garner support from an awful lot of democrats and independents in the end - and i wouldnt be the least bit surprised if he doesnt become our next president
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    May 05, 2016 10:56 PM GMT
    Saad, don't make the mistake of fitting one criticism from another era, however well-taken but involving different facts, to those facing us today. The focus on illegal immigration - and it is illegal, not overall, immigration that's the problem - is due to the open and obvious nature of the lawlessness, that it is winked at by both parties (but not by Trump), and that it not only costs us a lot of money, but undermines our society by eroding respect for the rule of law, and the ordered liberty under which we developed into one of the world's greatest nations. Add to that the active aiding and abetting of illegal immigration, which did not exist in prior times, and the illegals' well-funded advocacy groups, political and otherwise, and you have not just an imagined bogeyman who can be referred to as xenophobia to indicate some sort of social minded sophistication, but a real, legitimate object of fear and disorder that needs to be controlled and eliminated.

    Your final comments suggest you are a lot less open minded about Trump than your OP presented itself to be. That is your right, of course, but doesn't deviousness destroy discourse and decrease the credibility of those who fall back on inapposite analogies when the facts indicate otherwise? If you're truly interested in learning something from all this, I join those others who suggest you approach this subject with a truly open your mind, and not just let it be used as a conduit for cant.
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    May 05, 2016 11:05 PM GMT
    rip12 saidthis is almost comical - although i see the initial poster is not from the u.s.a. so perhaps it would be hard to understand - the world economic crisis the world has gone through has affected different people differently in different parts of the world

    im not into making predictions and wont do so here

    since the inception everyone (particularly the media and the power "elite" in washington) have underestimated the anger that is out in the general american population- it is palpable and has been for quite some time

    trump is clearly a populist - he is not "owned" by anyone and has brought up important issues that would never have been brought up if it werent for him

    the media and the power elite will stop at nothing to discredit him and, i suspect, this time its not going to work

    i would add that in their effort to discredit they have successfully demeaned at least half of the american population in their name calling and sarcastic remarks about anyone who dares admit to supporting trump

    it only fuels the fire - now the suspicion is that they are running scared for fear of losing their "power" because trump, again, is owned by no one

    if you dont like him dont vote for him - its really pretty simple

    again, im not into predictions - but i wouldnt be at all surprised if he doesnt garner support from an awful lot of democrats and independents in the end - and i wouldnt be the least bit surprised if he doesnt become our next president

    Well said, to which I'd only add that the piling on Trump's now getting from the [failed] Europeans is only adding to his appeal among more and more American voters. It'll be fun to finally see someone debate Billary on her own terms and throwing her tired rhetoric right back at her. Bernie comes close to doing so now, but he's still more of a Democrat than a Socialist, and his party loyalty prevents him from dealing with her as she ought to be dealt, i.e.,harshly. Laugh and chortle past the graveyard while you can, Missy, before it's time for you to walk your own private plank.
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    May 05, 2016 11:27 PM GMT
    I can't label myself a liberal or conservative. What can I say about Mr. Trump?

    He kicked them all in the balls and will try to get things done in DC for a change. Why not give him a chance......20-30 years and look how we've ended up! TRILLIONS lost in the way and what do we have to show for it??

    Cities like detroit are in ruin. More will happen if we don't change the plan!!
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    May 05, 2016 11:49 PM GMT
    MGINSD said

    Your final comments suggest you are a lot less open minded about Trump than your OP presented itself to be. That is your right, of course, but doesn't deviousness destroy discourse and decrease the credibility of those who fall back on inapposite analogies when the facts indicate otherwise? If you're truly interested in learning something from all this, I join those others who suggest you approach this subject with a truly open your mind, and not just let it be used as a conduit for cant.


    I am trying to understand the points you're making but it doesn't mean that I don't want to participate in the discussion.

    I have found Trump's campaign to be heavily relying on cheap tactics of manipulation and fear mongering

    So, it's only fair that I ask supporters whether you agree with my perspective, and if so, what you make of it.

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    May 06, 2016 12:01 AM GMT
    ELNathB said
    CODY4U saidJobs have been lost to outsourcing and illegal immigration. You can't expect people to be cool with something that's limiting opportunities for them as actual citizens. This is obviously an issue that had gone unaddressed long before Trump even announced he was running. Media pins way too much on Trump when he's far from the root of the issues. He's giving a voice to people who feel overlooked. The mistake the Anti-Trump crowds made was ignoring the public. He simply stepped up and spoke to them. Now they're speaking through their votes. I won't be voting for Trump, but I get some of the frustration and why people are choosing him.




    "Jobs have been lost to outsourcing and illegal immigration", yes but this is mainly the "fault game" played by Corporate America and Government. (on the same partisan party lines, rep v dem. The game, tit for tat. Corporate America is greedy, they play there own game of stagnate wage caps, that is why american 'workers' don't get ahead in life (you are a slave to debt that you can never get out of, wages are kept subdued for this purpose). If corporate america had its full control over government, which is really what is going on here, a fight for control between government, religion and corporate America, they would be able to "reset the wage bar" every time without consequence, which only helps themselves to larger profit margins. There is an old saying in business, "the fox guarding the hen house". The US is not China, not yet anyway


    Corporate America's greed has definitely helped to stir the pot and create the contention. Absolutely. I was saying that Donald Trump isn't the root of all these issues like the media likes to present. I also think the way media tries to blame Trump for all that's wrong in this country is another thing that makes support for him even stronger. His supporters see the manipulation and bias, and they go to the polls to counteract it. The whole "woman's card" thing was a perfect example. Hillary absolutely does use being a woman to weasel her way out of criticisms that had nothing to do with gender.
  • wellwell

    Posts: 2265

    May 06, 2016 12:58 AM GMT
    No_Hookups_Steve said1) Biggest reason is that he is not a politician...

    My Dad supports Trump too, and this is one of the reasons he does, but with that logic we should start hiring airline pilots with no experience, or training, to fly planes.

    Sorry, if this offends Trump supporters, but I wouldn't want someone with no experience running our country. That's foolish.



    ...Your buddy, the Prez, had one hundred and some odd days as a Senator; gee, that is a lot of experience !
    (LOL ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !)

    Politicians, L & R, have F*cked this country over and it will take a non-politician to get us back on the right path. I'd never vote for another D to occupy the white house; and for the chance to vote for a competent NonPolitician, who has a proven track record, and will put the US's interests first-and-foremost, -I'm On It!

    BTW, your analogy is absurd.
  • wellwell

    Posts: 2265

    May 06, 2016 1:26 AM GMT
    Saad22 said
    Ultimately, I see it as pure manipulation and dishonesty.

    So, considering that Trump has relied so heavily on these tactics during his campaign, I don’t see how he can be trusted to be president.

    What do you make of this ? Do you recognize that Trump has been fear mongering all through his campaign? Does it matter to you or do you just brush it off as a politician’s dirty but necessary work ?



    You've misread the situation, and the Candidate, completely.
    Stop worrying about his supporters; you've got a natural gift for spin–
    You should become a news writer for the main stream . . .