Into Shifting?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2016 4:12 AM GMT
    I hate shifting. Ever since I got my first truck with an automatic transmission I knew I'd never go back.

    Shifting sucks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2016 10:30 AM GMT
    I'll take a stick almost every time oner an automatic. I am more involved and engaged in driving...and nobody asks to use my car and you can just about leave it unlocked as most thieves can't drive a stick....icon_cool.gif
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    May 06, 2016 10:36 AM GMT
    Standard or death.

    Tho my latest vehicle is auto. Fuck. Price was right, needed wheels, drove it off the lot.
  • Farmboy8

    Posts: 88

    May 06, 2016 1:02 PM GMT
    Give me a standard any day of the week! If I had to commute into the city every day, I might reconsider, but otherwise I love the control of having a stick.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2016 1:05 PM GMT
    I love standard shift myself... Of course, growing up in the UK, it was all that I was used to. I love being able to control my shiftpoints.

    Cheers,

    Sean
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    May 06, 2016 1:16 PM GMT
    I can go either way... haha

    Love a stickshift for feeling more involved in the driving process.

    I'm considering converting my Mark VIII to a 6 speed manual, both for the gearing, and to make it more of a driver's car.
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    May 06, 2016 1:53 PM GMT
    I have never owned a car with automatic transmission, and I live in the city. In my opinion, stick shifts make you more aware that you're actually driving a car. I suppose it's only a matter of time before stick shifts completely disappear as we get closer to fully functional autonomous cars.
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    May 06, 2016 3:44 PM GMT
    -a manual gives you a few more options, especially in the winter time.
    -a manual is less vehicle less weight and possible improved reliability.
    -you can get a little more performance from a vehicle say you are towing a heavy trailer, a long down hill situation, the vehicle is a big land barge grocery getter with limited hp.

    its a good life skill to have for example if you borrow a friends vehicle you dont look totally disabled.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    May 06, 2016 4:01 PM GMT
    For my big car that I use on trips, automatic. But for my fun car, Jeep right now, stick. Love the performance though I know the new high-end automatics actually outperform even a professional driver. But they sure are fun. Wish I had a little MG with a stick.
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    May 06, 2016 4:07 PM GMT
    He doesn't matter to me , my car in Atlanta is automatic , my truck in Australia is manual .
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    May 06, 2016 4:23 PM GMT
    Manual all the way. Although I have owned a couple of vehicles with autotragic transmissions. They were just disposable CL purchases. Not something I'd choose by preference. Such a waste. Especially on my road:
    DSCF3899.jpg
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    May 06, 2016 4:59 PM GMT
    More than half my cars over the last 50 years have been manuals, including my first, on which I took my State drivers test. And of course all my motorcycles had clutches, although you shift them (as many as 6 speeds) with your foot, while your hand works the clutch, the opposite of a car.

    Newer automatics are virtually as efficient as manuals, accelerate as quickly, and many can be manually controlled when desired, some from the steering wheel. In urban stop-and-go traffic an automatic can make a lot of sense. But a manual is great if you wanna drive more challenging country back roads in a sporty car, one that excels at handling tricky curves, and you wanna be in total control.

    So I think there are different transmissions to suit different needs, vehicles and driving styles.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2016 5:01 PM GMT
    I have never driven an automatic car. Always a manual car.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2016 5:12 PM GMT
    Depends on the car and where I'm driving it. In traffic, I hate a standard. If it is a Porsche, it can only be standard.
  • fitartistsf

    Posts: 638

    May 06, 2016 5:42 PM GMT
    Here's one for you… I just turned 54, and I have NEVER driven a stick… Even back in high school, and Driver's Ed, we had an automatic to learn from, and I've never wanted to drive a stick, ever… I just love being at an intersection, when the light turns green, I'm pretty much clear across the intersection before the guy with the shift is getting up to speed. I just feel it's like, put it in gear and go... not having to worry about clutches, and gas, gears and all that crap…
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    May 06, 2016 5:50 PM GMT
    fitartistsf saidI just feel it's like, put it in gear and go... not having to worry about clutches, and gas, gears and all that crap…

    Yup. You should see what it's like when you're at a stop light going up hill and the light turns green.
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    May 06, 2016 6:16 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    fitartistsf saidI just feel it's like, put it in gear and go... not having to worry about clutches, and gas, gears and all that crap…

    Yup. You should see what it's like when you're at a stop light going up hill and the light turns green.

    That's one advantage to most modern manuals having a console-mounted handbrake. On a really steep hill you engage it with your hand, release button depressed, transmission in 1st, clutch pedal depressed, your right foot on the service brake pedal. When ready to move you do the usual clutch engagement routine, and when you feel the car want to move forward you begin to release the handbrake.

    May take some practice, but works quite well, no roll-back. On milder grades it merely requires some quicker foot work with the brake, clutch and accelerator. An added technique is to lift the clutch pedal part ways, to where you know the intial engagement point is, before you move your foot from the brake pedal to the accelerator. I've never had a problem with hills.
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    May 06, 2016 6:37 PM GMT
    With auto I always get the impression the car is driving me rather than the other way around.
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    May 06, 2016 6:46 PM GMT
    I was pleasantly surprised to find that most of the rental cars I drove in Europe were six-speed manual turbo-diesel rigs that the EPA won't let us have at home. Fun little cars. I have to admit that the first time, I did have a little trouble stalling one at the ramp out of the parking garage... The power curve of the engine was very different from anything I was used to.
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    May 06, 2016 6:50 PM GMT
    I used to drive a semi truck and trailer. Try going thru 16 gears before you have even crossed thru the intersection, double clutching all the way and a 2 speed axle.
    Oh the good old days... lol

    Even the new rigs have auto and semi auto transmissions. ( i think)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2016 7:01 PM GMT
    fitartistsf said Here's one for you… I just turned 54, and I have NEVER driven a stick… Even back in high school, and Driver's Ed, we had an automatic to learn from, and I've never wanted to drive a stick, ever… I just love being at an intersection, when the light turns green, I'm pretty much clear across the intersection before the guy with the shift is getting up to speed. I just feel it's like, put it in gear and go... not having to worry about clutches, and gas, gears and all that crap…

    A guy with a clutch in anything but an underpowered econobox isn't doing it right if he can't launch fast enough to match an automatic of comparable power on a public road.

    As for HS Driver's Ed, which sadly hardly exists anymore in much of the US, we had automatics, too, in the mid-1960s. My school's new Chevy Bel Air full-size sedans that I drove at age 16½ (minimal age under New Jersey law) were automatics.

    Equipped with a second brake pedal for the instructor on the front passenger side. Cars could also have a second steering wheel, but ours did not. These models also had full bench seats front & rear, could seat 3 up front, 3 behind, the standard for the era. But for classes we sat 5, so only the student driver and instructor were up front, the other students seated in the rear taking turns behind the wheel.

    The roads in Upper Montclair, New Jersey are very hilly. No student driver could have managed a clutch on those grades, so our automatics were a good choice. Simple 2-speed Powerglides (aka "Powerslides") serving an enemic straight-6. Perfect for novices.

    And yet, 6 months later on the day of my 17th birthday my present was a brand-new car, a 4-speed manual, purchased from a dealer right there in Montclair. So I had to drive it home (with my Father beside me) on many of those same hilly roads. No problemo.

    That was the car I used to pass my State driver's test 3 weeks later. And in a few more months I bought my first motorcycle. This time with with my own money, since my parents wouldn't buy me something they opposed. Passed that separate motorcycle driver's test on my first try, too. I was born to ride. LOL! icon_rolleyes.gif
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    May 06, 2016 7:04 PM GMT
    I have always had a manual gearbox, the only car I would have as an auto is a Range Rover, 3/4 of cars sold in the UK have a manual box but now things are changing with the DSG boxes some cars have now with paddle shift, don't like it, my brother went to buy a new BMW m4, and walked out because of not doing a manual, then went to Audi to look at the RS4, same again, walked out for the same reason, he has decided to keep the car he's got, their loss, the could have made some money out of him, those cars are over £50,000 each.

  • May 06, 2016 9:07 PM GMT
    Manual all the way. Automated manual if absolutely no choice but I loathe traditional automatics. I can't wait to get my MX5 running again. It's been sitting too long. I do need to get a taller ring and pinion though since my plans for it are meant to be a GT-alternative
  • Corby

    Posts: 78

    May 06, 2016 9:13 PM GMT
    It doesn't matter to me but preference to manual!
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    May 06, 2016 10:08 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    fitartistsf saidI just feel it's like, put it in gear and go... not having to worry about clutches, and gas, gears and all that crap…

    Yup. You should see what it's like when you're at a stop light going up hill and the light turns green.

    That's one advantage to most modern manuals having a console-mounted handbrake. On a really steep hill you engage it with your hand, release button depressed, transmission in 1st, clutch pedal depressed, your right foot on the service brake pedal. When ready to move you do the usual clutch engagement routine, and when you feel the car want to move forward you begin to release the handbrake.

    May take some practice, but works quite well, no roll-back. On milder grades it merely requires some quicker foot work with the brake, clutch and accelerator. An added technique is to lift the clutch pedal part ways, to where you know the intial engagement point is, before you move your foot from the brake pedal to the accelerator. I've never had a problem with hills.


    That's part of the driving test over here (for the full licence).