For the first time, a gay magazine called My Kali is published in Arabic and is available across the Middle East

  • metta

    Posts: 39091

    May 13, 2016 6:48 AM GMT
    For the first time, a gay magazine is published in Arabic and is available across the Middle East

    Magazine based in Jordan will provide voice for Arabic LGBTI people


    http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/first-time-gay-magazine-published-arabic-available-across-middle-east/
  • FirestormDavi...

    Posts: 340

    May 13, 2016 8:10 PM GMT
    haha and of course there's a woman on the cover.

    i can't believe any love minority anywhere thinks that bi (which is a MAJORITY, not minority) and gay guys that are actually guys want anything to do with them. it makes no sense for such differing groups to share a category.

    we have enough visibility to stand alone

    it's as insane as "If you're a Surgeon, stand here. Otherwise, you are Mechanic Pizza Delivery Guy Cardiologist War General Repo Man Architect"

  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    May 13, 2016 9:19 PM GMT
    its huge, but i''m not optimist about lgbt rights in arabic and muslim countries.
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    May 13, 2016 10:22 PM GMT
    Ashdod saidits huge, but i''m not optimist about lgbt rights in arabic and muslim countries.


    Same. As long as those barbaric, bronze-age ideals and traditions continue to dominate their society, so too will the tide of barbarous, inhuman conduct that seeks to establish such antiquated ethics be ever a threat to those who seek freedom and control over their own, private, personal lives.

    I only hope this initial step does not bring harm to a single individual, or worse: to many, and that it paves the way for further change in favor of personal liberties.
  • Cdnontherun

    Posts: 69

    May 14, 2016 7:38 AM GMT
    I would ask all of you to think back 50 years on your own societies. It wasn't very rosy then either. Their were people putting their careers, lives and families on the line to move us out of those "dark ages." We are not all destined to be at the same place at the same time. Of course if you look at recent history, you will understand that there was a time when the Middle East was on a similar trajectory as the West, but with a bit of lag in the movements. There were lots of universities and most women weren't covered. Oil and the West's need for resources brought war, corruption, and a continual backsliding to a place that because of the way the society and cultures are structured may have been more susceptible to a conservative bent. I have lived in the ME for three years and I am constantly amazed by a level of tolerance that is, of course, unspoken and the chances out gay folks are taking to move their society forward. I applaud this magazine and hope it lasts. It is also important to know that it is not the only magazine floating around the Middle East. We need to be careful diminishing the achievements of those who are not as far down the road as we are. For those who don't believe that there are giant moves being made in the Middle East, I'll give you the example of something that just happened last week. The powers that be in Jordan, which is a pretty conservative country especially once you leave Amman, cancelled an upcoming concert by a Lebanese band named Mashrou’ Leila whose front man is openly gay. Many of his songs are about gay topics and equality for women, but there was a community uproar big enough that they went against some clerics and rescheduled the show. Things are happening! By the way, education is the answer to terrorism and intolerance, not bombs.
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    May 14, 2016 12:37 PM GMT
    Thank you so much for sharing your perspective on this issue. I found your post informative, empathetic and insightful. I too believe that all societies and cultures evolve differently and that does not make mine's better or worse overall. I lived in Mexico in the 70s and 80s and in spite of the country's reputation of being socially conservative I was also amazed (and became involved with) the growth and evolution of a strong LGBT movement there.

    I believe it is counter-productive, if not racist, to brand an entire population as "backward" or "savages" without taking into account other historical nuances those societies or countries face. I appreciate that you pointed out the role that the West has played in the current Middle East situation. That is something that many of us in the West still do not want to own up to, instead preferring oversimplistic and juvenile responses such as "just bomb the heck out of them." Your statement that education and not bombs as an answer to these challenges is right on icon_smile.gif. To that comment I would like to add that education is a two-way street and that we can learn as much from other countries and cultures as they can learn from us. Good read! icon_cool.gif



    Cdnontherun saidI would ask all of you to think back 50 years on your own societies. It wasn't very rosy then either. Their were people putting their careers, lives and families on the line to move us out of those "dark ages." We are not all destined to be at the same place at the same time. Of course if you look at recent history, you will understand that there was a time when the Middle East was on a similar trajectory as the West, but with a bit of lag in the movements. There were lots of universities and most women weren't covered. Oil and the West's need for resources brought war, corruption, and a continual backsliding to a place that because of the way the society and cultures are structured may have been more susceptible to a conservative bent. I have lived in the ME for three years and I am constantly amazed by a level of tolerance that is, of course, unspoken and the chances out gay folks are taking to move their society forward. I applaud this magazine and hope it lasts. It is also important to know that it is not the only magazine floating around the Middle East. We need to be careful diminishing the achievements of those who are not as far down the road as we are. For those who don't believe that there are giant moves being made in the Middle East, I'll give you the example of something that just happened last week. The powers that be in Jordan, which is a pretty conservative country especially once you leave Amman, cancelled an upcoming concert by a Lebanese band named Mashrou’ Leila whose front man is openly gay. Many of his songs are about gay topics and equality for women, but there was a community uproar big enough that they went against some clerics and rescheduled the show. Things are happening! By the way, education is the answer to terrorism and intolerance, not bombs.
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    May 14, 2016 7:41 PM GMT
    Cdnontherun saidI would ask all of you to think back 50 years on your own societies. It wasn't very rosy then either. Their were people putting their careers, lives and families on the line to move us out of those "dark ages." We are not all destined to be at the same place at the same time. Of course if you look at recent history, you will understand that there was a time when the Middle East was on a similar trajectory as the West, but with a bit of lag in the movements. There were lots of universities and most women weren't covered. Oil and the West's need for resources brought war, corruption, and a continual backsliding to a place that because of the way the society and cultures are structured may have been more susceptible to a conservative bent. I have lived in the ME for three years and I am constantly amazed by a level of tolerance that is, of course, unspoken and the chances out gay folks are taking to move their society forward. I applaud this magazine and hope it lasts. It is also important to know that it is not the only magazine floating around the Middle East. We need to be careful diminishing the achievements of those who are not as far down the road as we are. For those who don't believe that there are giant moves being made in the Middle East, I'll give you the example of something that just happened last week. The powers that be in Jordan, which is a pretty conservative country especially once you leave Amman, cancelled an upcoming concert by a Lebanese band named Mashrou’ Leila whose front man is openly gay. Many of his songs are about gay topics and equality for women, but there was a community uproar big enough that they went against some clerics and rescheduled the show. Things are happening! By the way, education is the answer to terrorism and intolerance, not bombs.



    Yep, "Dark Ages" "Religious Nut Jobs"

    Christianity vs. Islam: Timeline of the Crusades
    http://atheism.about.com/library/FAQs/christian/blchron_xian_crusades.htm

    350 CE - 1800 CE

    The Crusades were religious, military, political, and commercial expeditions against both rival religions and rival Christian groups. They helped European society define itself and they laid the groundwork for end of feudalism. The relationship between Christianity and Islam was permanently altered and the Crusades continue through this day to influence how Islam sees the West.

    Color

    Topic
    BlueChristian victories, advances, and actions.
    YellowOther events: births, deaths, marriages, peace treaties, etc.
    GreenMuslim victories, advances, and actions.
    OrangeOther conflicts: Christians fighting Christians, Christians fighting heretics, Muslims fighting Mongols, Christians fighting Jews, etc.
    GreyMiscellaneous events to provide historical context and comparison



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 01, 2016 9:09 PM GMT
    Things may not have been rosy for gays in the West 50 years ago but I don't think the penalty for being gay was death in those "backwards times."

    I'd hate to have my name on a subscription list to a gay magazine anywhere in the ME. How tragic would it be for that list to fall into the wrong hands.