Israel is turning part of the Negev Desert into a cyber-city

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 17, 2016 2:10 PM GMT
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/how-israel-is-turning-part-of-the-negev-desert-into-a-cyber-city/2016/05/14/f44ea8e4-0d58-11e6-bfa1-4efa856caf2a_story.html
    BEERSHEBA, Israel — Here in the middle of the Negev Desert, a cyber-city is rising to cement Israel’s place as a major digital power. The new development, an outcropping of glass and steel, will concentrate some of the country’s top talent from the military, academia and business in an area of just a few square miles.

    No other country is so purposefully integrating its private, scholarly, government and military ­cyber-expertise...

    Chanukah-Elephant-Menorah-Back.jpg
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3381

    May 24, 2016 7:03 PM GMT
    Be'er Sheva, 1869:
    20rtcue.jpg

    Be'er Sheva, before 1914:
    29vj7o7.jpg

    Be'er Sheva into the 21st century:
    bjbvc6.jpg

    20k3bx1.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2016 4:40 AM GMT
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_IsraelThe History of Israel encompasses the Jewish history in the Land of Israel, as well as the history of the modern State of Israel. Modern Israel is roughly located on the site of the ancient kingdoms of Israel and Judah except that these kingdoms also included what is now the West Bank. It is the birthplace of the Hebrew language and of the Abrahamic religions. It contains sites sacred to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Druze and Bahá'í Faith.

    Although coming under the sway of various empires and home to a variety of ethnicities, the Land of Israel was predominantly Jewish until the 3rd century.[1] The area became increasingly Christian after the 3rd century and then largely Muslim following the 7th century conquest and until the middle of the 20th century. It was a focal point of conflict between Christianity and Islam between 1096 and 1291, and from the end of the Crusades was part of the Syrian province of first the Mamluk Sultanate and then the Ottoman Empire until the British conquest in 1917.

    A Jewish national movement, Zionism, emerged in the late-19th century. Following the British capture of Ottoman territories in the Levant, the Balfour Declaration in World War I and the formation of the Mandate of Palestine, Aliyah (Jewish immigration to the Land of Israel) increased, causing Arab–Jewish tensions and a collision of the Arab and Jewish nationalist movements. Israeli independence in 1948 was marked by massive migration of Jews from both Europe and the Muslim countries to Israel, and of Arabs from Israel, followed by the extensive Arab–Israeli conflict.[2] About 42% of the world's Jews live in Israel today, the largest Jewish community in the world.


    ...The first record of the name Israel (as ysrỉꜣr) occurs in the Merneptah stele, erected for Egyptian Pharaoh Merneptah (son of Ramses II) c. 1209 BCE...

    [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_the_name_%22Palestine%22[/url]...The first clear use of the term Palestine to refer to the entire area between Phoenicia and Egypt was in 5th century BC Ancient Greece,[7][8] when Herodotus wrote of a "district of Syria, called Palaistinê" in The Histories,...

    ...The use of the name "Palestine" became common in Early Modern English,[25] was used in English and Arabic during the Mutasarrifate of Jerusalem. In the 20th century the name was used by the British to refer to "Mandatory Palestine", a mandate from the former Ottoman Empire...


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NegevThe Negev (Hebrew: הַנֶּגֶב, Tiberian vocalization: han-Néḡeḇ ) or Naqab (Arabic: النقب‎‎ an-Naqab) is a desert and semidesert region of southern Israel. The region's largest city and administrative capital is Beersheba (pop. 196,000), in the north....

    ...The desert is home to the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, whose faculties include the Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research and the Albert Katz International School for Desert Studies, both located on the Midreshet Ben-Gurion campus adjacent to Sde Boker.

    1024px-Midreshet_Ben_Gurion.jpg

    In October 2012, global travel guide publisher Lonely Planet rated the Negev second on a list of the world's top ten regional travel destinations for 2013, noting its current transformation through development....
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    May 30, 2016 5:24 AM GMT
    GymFreak said...There was no "Israel" before 1948....


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_IsraelThe History of Israel encompasses the Jewish history in the Land of Israel, as well as the history of the modern State of Israel. Modern Israel is roughly located on the site of the ancient kingdoms of Israel and Judah except that these kingdoms also included what is now the West Bank. It is the birthplace of the Hebrew language and of the Abrahamic religions. It contains sites sacred to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Druze and Bahá'í Faith.

    Although coming under the sway of various empires and home to a variety of ethnicities, the Land of Israel was predominantly Jewish until the 3rd century.[1] The area became increasingly Christian after the 3rd century and then largely Muslim following the 7th century conquest and until the middle of the 20th century. It was a focal point of conflict between Christianity and Islam between 1096 and 1291, and from the end of the Crusades was part of the Syrian province of first the Mamluk Sultanate and then the Ottoman Empire until the British conquest in 1917.

    A Jewish national movement, Zionism, emerged in the late-19th century. Following the British capture of Ottoman territories in the Levant, the Balfour Declaration in World War I and the formation of the Mandate of Palestine, Aliyah (Jewish immigration to the Land of Israel) increased, causing Arab–Jewish tensions and a collision of the Arab and Jewish nationalist movements. Israeli independence in 1948 was marked by massive migration of Jews from both Europe and the Muslim countries to Israel, and of Arabs from Israel, followed by the extensive Arab–Israeli conflict.[2] About 42% of the world's Jews live in Israel today, the largest Jewish community in the world.


    ...The first record of the name Israel (as ysrỉꜣr) occurs in the Merneptah stele, erected for Egyptian Pharaoh Merneptah (son of Ramses II) c. 1209 BCE...

    [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_the_name_%22Palestine%22[/url]...The first clear use of the term Palestine to refer to the entire area between Phoenicia and Egypt was in 5th century BC Ancient Greece,[7][8] when Herodotus wrote of a "district of Syria, called Palaistinê" in The Histories,...

    ...The use of the name "Palestine" became common in Early Modern English,[25] was used in English and Arabic during the Mutasarrifate of Jerusalem. In the 20th century the name was used by the British to refer to "Mandatory Palestine", a mandate from the former Ottoman Empire...


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NegevThe Negev (Hebrew: הַנֶּגֶב, Tiberian vocalization: han-Néḡeḇ ) or Naqab (Arabic: النقب‎‎ an-Naqab) is a desert and semidesert region of southern Israel. The region's largest city and administrative capital is Beersheba (pop. 196,000), in the north....

    ...The desert is home to the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, whose faculties include the Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research and the Albert Katz International School for Desert Studies, both located on the Midreshet Ben-Gurion campus adjacent to Sde Boker.

    1024px-Midreshet_Ben_Gurion.jpg

    In October 2012, global travel guide publisher Lonely Planet rated the Negev second on a list of the world's top ten regional travel destinations for 2013, noting its current transformation through development....
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3381

    May 30, 2016 2:18 PM GMT
    Quotes from GF/GS's video, which shows the desolation in the region:

    this neglected region of the expiring Ottoman empire has been consigned to divine vengeance.

    German and Turkish* soldiers will be taken prisoner by Indian units of the British Army

    2/3rds of the population are already Jewish
    [of Jerusalem]

    * The largest ethnic group in the Ottoman Turkish army, after Turks, were Arabs.
    Some 300,000 of them, including from [greater] Syria/Palestine.



    Road from Jaffa to Jerusalem, mid 1890s vs present day:
    mhyjki.jpg

    jerusalem_forest_pikiwiki.jpg

    Israel is the only country in the world that in 2000 had more trees than in 1900.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3381

    May 30, 2016 2:19 PM GMT
    GymFreak said
    There was no "Israel" before 1948... The land was called Palestine.

    Contemplate that prior to the Mandate (to re-establish the jewish state), there was NEVER a "Palestine".
    It was just the name of a geographic region describing the Jewish homeland.
    (Going back 1,000 years, it was also the name of the military district of a foreign Arab empire that occupied this land and ruled it from afar.)

    There has been a "Land of Israel" for at least 3,300 years.
    The modern State of Israel was established in 1948.

    Before that there was the Palestine Mandate.
    It was entrusted to re-establish the Jewish state in the Jewish homeland.
    Where Jews had been living, CONTINUOUSLY, for over 3,300 years.
    In a land where Jews were the only national group to ever self-govern, locally & independently.
    All others, including 4 Arab empires and several other Muslim empires, were foreign occupiers, ruling from afar.

    http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/palmanda.asp
    Preamble: Whereas recognition has thereby been given to the historical connection of the Jewish people with Palestine and to the grounds for reconstituting their national home IN that country

    Article 2: The Mandatory shall be responsible for placing the country under such political, administrative and economic conditions as will secure the establishment of the Jewish national home, as laid down in the preamble, and the development of self-governing institutions

    Note that Mandates were training-wheels to establish independent states, not "homelands" or bantustans. The terminology here is in deference to the earlier (1917) Balfour Declaration which used this language. But the intent is clear, to establish Jewish "self-governing institutions" IN (stated 15 times, not "within" as propagandists try to twist) the region. Excluded (by Article 25) was eastern or Trans-Jordanian Palestine, the 80% of the territory that lay east of the Jordan River (Trans-Jordan gained independence as an Arab state in 1946. After invading and conquering Judea & Samaria in 1948, it reunited these regions as its so-called "West Bank" and renamed itself simply as "Jordan". In 1970-71 the PLO attempted to take over Jordan but was defeated and fled to southern Lebanon, leading to that country's civil war.)

    Why would the League of Nations call the Jewish state-to-be "Palestine"?!
    Because 100 years ago "Palestine" was NOT the name of an Arab country or ethnic group.
    It was the Latin/European name for Eretz Yisrael, the Land of Israel.

    2iruulv.jpg

    From the Etymological dictionary, providing the origin of words:

    dqso6v.jpg

    Which is why, into the 1950s, Arab historians and leaders denied that there was such a place as "Palestine" or "Palestinians" - which back then was more likely a reference to Jews living in Mandate Palestine (e.g. the Palestine Mule Corps was composed of Jewish volunteers in the British Army in WW I. The Palestine Post is today Israel's Jerusalem Post. The Palestine Brewery is today Israel's Nesher Beer. The Palestine Brigades were Jewish volunteers in the British Army in WW II. In contrast, the Arabs of Mandate Palestine were represented by the Arab High Committee).

    33w43tj.jpg

    Prior to WW I, for 400 years under the Ottoman Empire and for more than 200 years under the Mamluk Empire, there was no "Palestine" jurisdiction or demography.

    All of which has been discussed on RJ in great detail, but evidently GF/GS has nothing new to offer so simply reverts to his prior propaganda pranks.

    "Palestine" is the Latin/European name for Eretz Yisrael, the Jewish homeland
    and early 20th century Arab denials of the existence of "Palestine".

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/349491

    Arabs (like Arabic) NOT indigenous to Israel
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/4019405

    The Palestine Paradox
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/2652202

    The Emergence of Palestinian Arab Nationalism
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/4193729

    Jerusalem
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/887747

    1947-1948: Arabs reject compromise and attack Israel
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/960691