Vegan ways to pack protein and gain weight?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 17, 2016 3:24 PM GMT
    Any suggestions based on successful outcomes and approaches.
  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    May 17, 2016 3:43 PM GMT
    https://goo.gl/pl2pyM
  • transient

    Posts: 198

    May 17, 2016 3:43 PM GMT
    Nuts, seeds and green vegetables are the best.

    Look into "food combining" ie. Beans with brown rice give you a full spectrum of amino acids(protein).

    The only vegetative protein to have the full compliment of amino acids is hemp......and it's both super expensive and illegal to grow.

    I am interested....why are to vegan?
  • Corby

    Posts: 78

    May 17, 2016 7:56 PM GMT
    Chia seeds - they are loaded with nutrients that can have important benefits for your body and brain. Chia seeds are high in quality protein, much higher than most plant foods.

    The seeds themselves taste rather bland, so you can add them to pretty much anything.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 17, 2016 9:22 PM GMT
    Thank you for the advice guys icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 18, 2016 8:58 AM GMT
    Just tell yourself that chickens are vegetables and you'll be well on your way to eating enough protein.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 18, 2016 8:59 AM GMT
    After spending several months living with chickens I'm unsure whether chickens are any more sentient than your common vegetable
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 18, 2016 11:49 AM GMT
    Gp25 saidAny suggestions based on successful outcomes and approaches.


    Part of that is figuring out how many calories you need to eat in your day.

    http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/

    That will get you a base. Depending on your activity level you might need to adjust it up a bit.

    You can use this as a guide for doing that:
    http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/harris-benedict-equation/


    Then figure out your protein daily requirement. ( RDA for vegans is 0.4g per lb of body weight and for strength athletes is 0.6g to 0.8g for strength athletes)

    I'm 200 lbs so my numbers work out something like this:

    Daily minimum calories: 1928
    Daily protien range: 80 - 160g

    The base level of protein is pretty easy as it is abut 17% of my daily calories. In the end I come up a little short based on the food that eat and use a protein powder to cover the gap.

    I would track your daily intake and see where you are currently are at in your calorie and protein intake and see where you are short. You can probably modify your diet a bit to boost either and then look into a supplement depending on how high you want to go on the protein side.

    As for the comment about protein combining, that has long been since disproven. There are only nine amino acids that your body can't make from other materials and there are no foods that don't have the 9 essential amino acids. It is almost impossible to not meet your minimum requirements by just eating base level of calories.

    Good luck.
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    May 18, 2016 11:20 PM GMT
    transient saidNuts, seeds and green vegetables are the best.

    Look into "food combining" ie. Beans with brown rice give you a full spectrum of amino acids(protein).

    The only vegetative protein to have the full compliment of amino acids is hemp......and it's both super expensive and illegal to grow.

    I am interested....why are to vegan?


    Sounds like bird food.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 20, 2016 12:17 AM GMT
    Corby saidChia seeds - they are loaded with nutrients that can have important benefits for your body and brain. Chia seeds are high in quality protein, much higher than most plant foods.

    The seeds themselves taste rather bland, so you can add them to pretty much anything.



    Chia seeds are next to useless for protein.

    Honestly, you're going to have a hell of a time packing on muscle while also trying to maintain a vegan diet. I was ovo-lacto vegetarian for nearly two decades and only when I started incorporating meat back into my diet did I see faster gains.

    That said, Vega brand protein powder has a newer version of their powder out called "Vega Sport Performance Protein" that has a decent protein-to-quantity ratio. Stay away from their other version of powders, though, as those are absurdly low in the protein-to-quantity ratio.
  • Breeman

    Posts: 339

    May 20, 2016 12:39 AM GMT
    Thanks for this.
    'd like to go vegan. I'm almost completely vegetarian - if that's possible. I gave up red meat 5 years ago. I have no craving for it. It's going to be tough giving up cheese. Anyway I'm still doing the research.

    For the animals
    For the environment
    For health!
  • transient

    Posts: 198

    May 24, 2016 9:19 PM GMT
    Cliche_Guevara said
    Gp25 said.

    As for the comment about protein combining, that has long been since disproven. There are only nine amino acids that your body can't make from other materials and there are no foods that don't have the 9 essential amino acids. It is almost impossible to not meet your minimum requirements by just eating base level of calories.

    Good luck.



    This may be so, but if you want to pack on lean weight on a vegan diet it's best to consume all the amino acids......why force your body to work harder to synthesise the more complex ones?

    It makes sence in a calorific way too.....would you eat just beans, without rice or grains?or vice versa?



    The OP is looking to exceed calorific and protein requirements......not maintain base levels.



    .......................


    Do you have access to local sourced organic raw milk?

    I have been vegetarian for 10+ years and rely heavily on my herd of organic goats.
    I make cheese everyday, consume litres of the leftover raw whey,eat raw salad for lunch and simple combined foods in the evening.

    Good luck if you can sustain veganism, don't be hard on yourself if you can't.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 24, 2016 10:40 PM GMT
    transient said
    Cliche_Guevara said
    Gp25 said.

    As for the comment about protein combining, that has long been since disproven. There are only nine amino acids that your body can't make from other materials and there are no foods that don't have the 9 essential amino acids. It is almost impossible to not meet your minimum requirements by just eating base level of calories.

    Good luck.



    This may be so, but if you want to pack on lean weight on a vegan diet it's best to consume all the amino acids......why force your body to work harder to synthesise the more complex ones?

    It makes sence in a calorific way too.....would you eat just beans, without rice or grains?or vice versa?



    The OP is looking to exceed calorific and protein requirements......not maintain base levels.



    .......................


    Do you have access to local sourced organic raw milk?

    I have been vegetarian for 10+ years and rely heavily on my herd of organic goats.
    I make cheese everyday, consume litres of the leftover raw whey,eat raw salad for lunch and simple combined foods in the evening.

    Good luck if you can sustain veganism, don't be hard on yourself if you can't.




    There isn't food that doesn't have all the amino acids in them. You can't not consume them all.

    Also, I fail to to see what difference it makes if body is synthesizing them or you are consuming them. Your body breaks down the protein you eat and rebuilds it as it is. It isn't like you are saving it time.

  • transient

    Posts: 198

    May 25, 2016 12:56 PM GMT
    Breeman said

    For the animals
    For the environment
    For health!


    This is great!

    For me it's important to think global but eat local.

    I would rather eat locally produced organic food rather than imported non-organic food produced by a large corporation.

    It's about ethics for me.


    ...........................................


    I avoid soy products for this reason, yet they are marketed aggressively as the solution to a vegan lifestyle.

    Mass farmed, factory processed, full of fillers and preservatives. And people call this health food!



    If you can afford it, buy locally produced nuts and seeds. Nuts are always best still in their shell, they are not oxidised by the air. Once they are oxidised they start to breakdown, go rancid and the nutritional value decreases.

    Even better, grow your own.

    2nd best, support a local farmer!

    Sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds(any squash), Linn seeds, pippy seeds are all excellent and easy to grow even in a small space.

    Good luck OP.