Christian school threatens to EXPEL students if they have a gay family member

  • metta

    Posts: 39138

    May 21, 2016 6:49 AM GMT
    Christian school threatens to EXPEL students if they have a gay family member


    http://www.pinknews.co.uk/2016/05/20/christian-school-threatens-to-expel-pupils-if-they-have-a-gay-family-member/


    Trinity Academy
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Trinity-Academy/323545914505482?fref=ts
  • okaces91

    Posts: 33

    May 21, 2016 11:17 AM GMT
    Great... They do know it's not a choice, right? This is why I always put a shield up before anyone from church can truly get to know me icon_sad.gif. There will always be some sort of discrimination or "less than" sentiment if people knew.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2016 1:21 PM GMT
    In Article 3, Section 3 of the US Constitution there is a provision stating "...no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood." It's an obscure 18th Century legal term, meaning that the relatives of a traitor cannot also be punished for the same crime if they aren't involved.

    Today that legal doctrine exists regarding other crimes, as well. Otherwise the family of a convicted felon might also have to serve a prison term.

    It would appear that here is another of our bedrock US legal principles that dates back to 1787 and the signing of the Constitution that no longer applies to select groups. All one has to do is say the magic words "Deeply held religious beliefs" and the law doesn't apply to that person or group.

    As a nation we've gone from "E Puribus Unum" to "E Pluribus Multis".
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19136

    May 21, 2016 3:34 PM GMT
    This is yet another example as to why I consider myself a "spiritual" person but not someone who participates in organized religion. Thankfully, not all religions are rigid and judgmental like this
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    May 21, 2016 3:55 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidIn Article 3, Section 3 of the US Constitution there is a provision stating "...no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood." It's an obscure 18th Century legal term, meaning that the relatives of a traitor cannot also be punished for the same crime if they aren't involved.

    Today that legal doctrine exists regarding other crimes, as well. Otherwise the family of a convicted felon might also have to serve a prison term.

    It would appear that here is another of our bedrock US legal principles that dates back to 1787 and the signing of the Constitution that no longer applies to select groups. All one has to do is say the magic words "Deeply held religious beliefs" and the law doesn't apply to that person or group.

    As a nation we've gone from "E Puribus Unum" to "E Pluribus Multis".


    Art, these constitutional guarantees, like the one you cited or the ones in the bill of rights bind only the government, in some cases even only the federal government, but not private entities. You are fully within your rights, for instance, to refuse to shake your neighbor's hand, or build an ugly fence (within code, of course), because he he supports Trump, or even because his parents support Trump. But the government cannot, for instance, make all Trump supporters take an IQ test. Similarly, a private school can expel a student for any reason, as long as it doesn't take any federal money, or breaks public accommodation laws in cases where they are subject to those, which is often not the case for religious schools. So, sadly, they can probably legally do what they do, although an aggrieved parent might want to look into a civil suit for breach of contract, depending on how their contract with them looks like.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2016 4:23 PM GMT
    ...so the "sins" of the father actually ARE the "sins" of the son?...at least for this cult in the school business. Nice, Hitler would be so proud.icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    May 21, 2016 4:26 PM GMT
    I am an atheist who went to Catholic schools. I am not a big fan of people that believe in the Supernatural. Have some great friends and loved ones that do.

    But a private school, which I am guessing this is, should have that right. Harsh, but hey, a private entity is a private entity. It should be able to have it's own rules. Why would this kid's family want him in a school that feels this way? If it was a Jewish school, and he was Christian, or his family was, sure. Kick him out. That is called Freedom of Association in the US Constitution.

  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    May 21, 2016 4:32 PM GMT
    By definition, that school would not have the values, morals or ethics that I would want my child to have. So, why fight to keep them there? Find a school that has better values, morals and ethics. Or home school.
  • FirestormDavi...

    Posts: 340

    May 21, 2016 4:59 PM GMT
    Triggerman saidBy definition, that school would not have the values, morals or ethics that I would want my child to have. So, why fight to keep them there? Find a school that has better values, morals and ethics. Or home school.


    really good point. should be an opportunity for them to get the fuck out haha
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 21, 2016 5:09 PM GMT
    I know all about Trinity Academy... I have financial clients who work there and I made a proposal for their retirement plan for their employees... however they use a defined benefit plan with a graduate of the school.

    Awesome school, it is 2 miles from my home. I could walk there. Large growth in recent years, I see students all the time. Awesome facilities, too bad their progressive attitude doesn't extend to perception.
  • NealJohn

    Posts: 187

    May 21, 2016 5:27 PM GMT
    This is the complete OPPOSITE of how a Christian should act . But no surprise , the leaders of the churches in Jesus' day were blind leaders of the blind, and I'm afraid the current churches have come full circle.

    God is not a respecter of persons
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    May 21, 2016 5:39 PM GMT
    I live by a moral code. Treat everyone with respect and leave the world a bit better than you found it. Not Christian, it is pre Christian. It is found on writings 4,000 years ago.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2016 6:21 PM GMT
    If they are listed as a "Christian, private high school", such as a Lutheran or Catholic denomination, I have no problem with them publically expelling students of LGBT relatives or not accepting LGBT student enrollment.

    If they want to publically be bigots, its their own prerogative, if its listed as a religious school.

    On the other hand, if the school is not considered Christian or religious by definition of the US education department or board of education and would fall under the public school system instead, then I would have a problem. Interjecting religion in a public school setting should never be tolerated

    The school is in Kansas and apparently, the school website, http://www.trinityacademy.org/ has been down

    Trinity Academy responds to report of expelling students with gay relatives
    http://ksn.com/2016/05/20/trinity-academy-responds-to-report-of-expelling-students-with-gay-relatives/
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1034

    May 21, 2016 6:42 PM GMT
    Triggerman saidBy definition, that school would not have the values, morals or ethics that I would want my child to have. So, why fight to keep them there? Find a school that has better values, morals and ethics. Or home school.


    You're absolutely right, but this is not simply a case of values, morals and ethics. A school's primary function is education, after all. If I were a parent I'd have to wonder exactly what kind of crap the school is filling the kids' heads with, about homosexuality and a variety of other topics.

    A coworker of mine married an ultra-religious woman (a bad choice he regrets to this day) who insisted their son be sent to a private Baptist school. Every weekend he had to undo the load of Creationist bullshit his kid was taught in their "science" class. He'd bring some of the science test questions and "correct" answers into the office and we'd have a good laugh - but the fact that generations of children are still being taught this nonsense is no joke.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2016 7:26 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidThis is yet another example as to why I consider myself a "spiritual" person but not someone who participates in organized religion. Thankfully, not all religions are rigid and judgmental like this


    +1
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    May 21, 2016 8:00 PM GMT
    Sorry Bro4Bro,

    A religious school is not the same as a public school that gets money from the state.

    Their goal may very well be educating students. Usually it is. Been there and done it.

    But their primary purpose, the reason they exist, is to teach their religion. Otherwise, why exist?
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1034

    May 22, 2016 12:39 AM GMT
    Trigger, I'm not quite sure what you're "sorry" about. I simply said parents should consider what kind of crap their children might be taught before sending their kids to a religious school. The vast majority of parents who send their kids to religious schools aren't looking to have their kids indoctrinated, they're only looking for a high quality education in a "safe" environment that they feel public schools can't provide.

    While religious schools certainly have the autonomy to teach religion, they are also accredited by the state as educational institutions. I can't help wondering how they manage to maintain that accreditation if they don't provide a legitimate science curriculum.

    Oh, and as for why they exist... it's money, honey.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 22, 2016 2:11 AM GMT
    bro4bro saidTrigger, I'm not quite sure what you're "sorry" about. I simply said parents should consider what kind of crap their children might be taught before sending their kids to a religious school. The vast majority of parents who send their kids to religious schools aren't looking to have their kids indoctrinated, they're only looking for a high quality education in a "safe" environment that they feel public schools can't provide.

    While religious schools certainly have the autonomy to teach religion, they are also accredited by the state as educational institutions. I can't help wondering how they manage to maintain that accreditation if they don't provide a legitimate science curriculum.

    Oh, and as for why they exist... it's money, honey.




    I will tell you, because I was one of those students, not by my choice, who attended a K-12 'Christian school'. Yes, these schools do not get state or local government funding.

    My school(s) were funded by the Lutheran church and the "10% annual required donation" of members income. As parents, If you were a regular, sustaining and church going member or participant, half to three quarters of your child's tuition was paid for depending on the total finances your family incurred.

    It was like a bank loan but parents didn't have to pay it back as long as they stayed connected to the church, the church needed to know my parents income and monetary contributions, year by year in order to determine how much tuition the church needed to pay.

    My entire K-12 education was paid for like this. Its interesting, I never really discussed this with either of my parents to find out exactly how this worked since the tuition was "none of my business", my job was just to show up and graduate, lol. In order to graduate senior year, I had to have so many total credit hours of Lutheran 'religion indoctrination' classes.

    Looking back, I would have preferred shop, auto or swim classes instead, but in a religious college prep school, those are not options.


    seriously, I was an Usher.....



  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 22, 2016 4:24 AM GMT
    Whipmagic said
    Art, these constitutional guarantees, like the one you cited or the ones in the bill of rights bind only the government, in some cases even only the federal government, but not private entities. You are fully within your rights, for instance, to refuse to shake your neighbor's hand, or build an ugly fence (within code, of course), because he he supports Trump, or even because his parents support Trump. But the government cannot, for instance, make all Trump supporters take an IQ test. Similarly, a private school can expel a student for any reason, as long as it doesn't take any federal money, or breaks public accommodation laws in cases where they are subject to those, which is often not the case for religious schools. So, sadly, they can probably legally do what they do, although an aggrieved parent might want to look into a civil suit for breach of contract, depending on how their contract with them looks like.

    I understand this is a religious school, that may not be receiving Federal funds. At the same time, it does not make them totally immune from the law, although I'm sure they think they are.

    For instance, may they kill their students? A rather absurd comparison, but an example of a law for which they'd be prosecuted if they broke it, no matter what their religious beliefs are. Why can they break some laws, but not others? Who makes this determination, and using what criteria?

    This school policy may also violate legal provisions regarding freedom of association, and with one's own family members, no less. Is this a school or a cult?

    And why are LGBT singled out for this treatment? What if a student's older sister marries a Jewish man, or perhaps an atheist, and they both live in the same house as the parents and student? Or live nearby and visit the parents often? Would that also represent an atmosphere of living outside Scripture?

    Maybe this Academy should be investigated for subjecting its students to irrational cult rules.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 22, 2016 3:56 PM GMT
    Don't go to school there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 22, 2016 8:46 PM GMT
    It would probably be a blessing in disguise for the gay kids to be expelled from that Christian school. I wouldn't want them to be brainwashed in a toxic environment either.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 23, 2016 9:01 PM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    If it is strictly a religious school then outside of killing or maiming or kidnapping people, they ought to be pretty much free to run their organization and be as scummy as they see fit with some exceptions.

    If they accept any public funding (school vouchers, for instance) then they ought to be required to follow the rules the rest of us have to follow.

    Similarly, if they engage in secular politics, then they ought to lose their non profit status which comes to them under the guise of religion: render to Caesar is not just for salad dressing.

    And even while they enjoy non profit status, while their church property is exempt from property taxes, they ought not enjoy, without paying a fee, services provided everyone else by their property taxes paid. This should include police & fire/rescue. And tax exemption should be limited to their churches, on-site rectories, hospitals places of charity (food banks, homeless housing, etc) and schools including the buildings, land under the buildings along with appropriate parking and landscaped space but should not include any other investment or land holding scheme.

    A church's two room schoolhouse on 10 acres? Nine of those acres ought to be taxed.