Girls in gay clubs

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2016 2:38 PM GMT
    Please read this :
    http://www.queerty.com/student-says-kicked-gay-club-woman-contacts-police-20160524

    I wish this would happen in Houston!!! about two weeks ago, I went out to some gay clubs and there were better looking straight women in the gay clubs than gay men. This really pissed me off!!! like all of the dancers in the Houston gay clubs are straight and they spend more time with the girls than gay guys. Really, If a straight guy in Houston wants a hot straight girl, than they should go to a gay club, because that is where they are all at .
    Why cant Houston do the Europe gay card system?
    There was this one really hot dancer at a gay club and I asked him for a lap dance and he tells me, he only give girls lap dancers ??
    We are at a gay club!!! They should fire his ass!!!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    May 31, 2016 1:33 AM GMT
    Of course girls should not be admitted to venues which serve drinks containing ethanol. However, if we complain about adult women who wish to enter gay clubs, then we forfeit the right to complain when we experience discrimination for being gay.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2016 3:00 AM GMT
    Gay Club???

    What's that??

    A thing of the past as more and more regular straight people invade the gay clubs.
    Oh, Back in the days.......
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    May 31, 2016 3:22 AM GMT
    That ship has sailed. The clubs on the gay strip in Dallas are filled with women now, usually having bachelorette parties. I think their boyfriends approve of them doing it around gay guys :p

    Bear bars are probably still safe... for now...
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    May 31, 2016 4:35 AM GMT
    I don't see the problem. She wasn't a member of the club so she couldn't get in. I've always said I wanted to open an exclusive, members only gay club and restrict membership to gay men only and membership would be by invitation only.

    Or I'd open a gay club open to the public but charge women a cover charge that was determined by weight. No woman would want to step on a scale to get into anywhere. That should keep the bachelorette parties out.

    Oh and dancers would be gay. No straight boys dancing on my bar.
  • SilverRRCloud

    Posts: 874

    May 31, 2016 5:22 AM GMT
    JackTX saidThat ship has sailed.


    Very true!

    Gay clubs are first and foremost clubs. These guys need to make money, pay the loans, taxes, salaries, and hopefully take some profit back home, too! The gay world has largely moved on and is hanging on cost-free apps, these days. Saves time, money, travel, socializing and gives you what you want, pretty much when you want it. So, the clubs are changing in order to survive. Can't blame them for that.

    Everyone I know bemoans the loss of the bars, clubs, spas, neighborhoods, gay districts, etc. but none of us are doing anything to save them. Coz, their time is overicon_sad.gif Until someone smart enough and well-networked comes up with whatever that may be to challenge the apps.

    SC

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    May 31, 2016 12:29 PM GMT
    Not4u saidI don't see the problem. She wasn't a member of the club so she couldn't get in. I've always said I wanted to open an exclusive, members only gay club and restrict membership to gay men only and membership would be by invitation only.

    Or I'd open a gay club open to the public but charge women a cover charge that was determined by weight. No woman would want to step on a scale to get into anywhere. That should keep the bachelorette parties out.

    Oh and dancers would be gay. No straight boys dancing on my bar.

    Good luck with finding gay dancers... I have only see two in Houston and one really should not be a dancer and the other told me that the clubs stop hiring him and now he is a rent boy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2016 12:32 PM GMT
    SilverRRCloud said
    JackTX saidThat ship has sailed.


    Very true!

    Gay clubs are first and foremost clubs. These guys need to make money, pay the loans, taxes, salaries, and hopefully take some profit back home, too! The gay world has largely moved on and is hanging on cost-free apps, these days. Saves time, money, travel, socializing and gives you what you want, pretty much when you want it. So, the clubs are changing in order to survive. Can't blame them for that.

    Everyone I know bemoans the loss of the bars, clubs, spas, neighborhoods, gay districts, etc. but none of us are doing anything to save them. Coz, their time is overicon_sad.gif Until someone smart enough and well-networked comes up with whatever that may be to challenge the apps.

    SC



    I hated app like Grindr and tender !!! I can't get a date!!! Only people wanting sex or just really weird looking people or really old people. I do not get what I want from apps or the gay clubs.
    I am looking for a real man to date!
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    May 31, 2016 6:02 PM GMT
    SilverRRCloud saidEveryone I know bemoans the loss of the bars, clubs, spas, neighborhoods, gay districts, etc. but none of us are doing anything to save them.


    I'm drinking as fast as I can man!! icon_evil.gif
  • nice_chap

    Posts: 280

    May 31, 2016 9:15 PM GMT
    I don't give a fuck what girls get up to in gay pubs as long as they stay away from our saunas.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1277

    May 31, 2016 10:00 PM GMT
    I really would hate to get to the point where there is not even a need for gay clubs anymore. I mean, on some level it's a good thing from an acceptance point of view, but, to me it's kind of a sacred place for myself and my gay brothers to hang out. Does EVERYTHING in this world have to get blended into a politically correct, homogenized, neutered, bland form of being?
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    Jun 01, 2016 1:18 AM GMT
    It's been my experience over the century that whenever gay clubs starting accepting lesbians or straight woman and later their bf's that the club either closed or just went straight.. seen it over and over in Vancouver, Calgary etc. Bars can't make money at all off lesbians, they're too cheap and just nurse a soft drink all night
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Jun 01, 2016 1:54 AM GMT
    OH honey, there are still GAY CLUBS, you just dont do a lot of dancing there:

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  • mcbrion

    Posts: 305

    Jun 03, 2016 2:23 AM GMT
    This sounds like the '70s, when the clubs started being more exclusively male, rather than mixed.
    After Stonewall, it wasn't necessary to have women in the clubs for men to pretend to be dancing with when the police raided the place. Little by little, when gay culture turned into "wanna-be's" (meaning the gay men mimicked the whole I-want-to-look-masculine look), the men got a sense of faux-masculinity and started wanting to just have the club be all male. Happened several times in San Francisco until the lesbians, Blacks and Hispanics demonstrated outside the Mineshaft (we were all being carded, while the White guys weren't) and finally, the club stopped doing it. Immediately, the White guys left, the clubgoers were the lesbians, Black and Hispanics. The end result? The music got better (heh, heh) because it had people who could dance and the lead dj, Tim Rivers, who went on to become known as a "dj's dj" because he actually knew music (had a degree In music) and wouldn't play just the standard drivel, blew the roof off the standard disco fare that was played in clubs. He was a rarity, though. That was the only bar you heard Stevie Wonder, The Doobie Brothers, and Luther Vandross (and it was only 1976!) But I digress.
    By 1978, when the I-Beam was THE gay dance club, the doormen regularly turned away women on the grounds that they had open-toed shoes (just a way to keep them out) and it took hold there. However, when Trocadero Transfer opened (for the "twinkie crowd" as it was called, because it wasn't the A crowd bodybuilders that went there: it was just the 'normal' crowd, which included women) that problem never existed there. Interesting, since the I-Beam only opened two months before Trocadero. But then, in the Castro, it was the back to more of the same: Boystown. Women were not really welcome, and interestingly enough, not even that visible, now that I think about it until 1982 when one bar on 18th at Collingwood Street was reopened as a lesbian bar. The lesbians quickly felt the dismissiveness of the gay men, which was ironic, since, two years later, when AIDS was in full swing, the lesbians were taking care of those very same guys who threw shade their way just a few years earlier.
    This shouldn't be happening now, but despite all the "How could this happen? It's 2016, for Chrissakes!" howls, we are hardly much more enlightened than we were in 1976. Progress takes centuries, not decades.
    The guys who just stood by and let this happen? They were as much a part of the problem as the doormen. Inclusiveness is still an issue between gay men and gay women (and transvestites and transgenders, for that matter).
  • SilverRRCloud

    Posts: 874

    Jun 03, 2016 7:04 AM GMT
    mcbrion saidThis sounds like the '70s, when the clubs started being more exclusively male, rather than mixed.
    After Stonewall, it wasn't necessary to have women in the clubs for men to pretend to be dancing with when the police raided the place. Little by little, when gay culture turned into "wanna-be's" (meaning the gay men mimicked the whole I-want-to-look-masculine look), the men got a sense of faux-masculinity and started wanting to just have the club be all male. Happened several times in San Francisco until the lesbians, Blacks and Hispanics demonstrated outside the Mineshaft (we were all being carded, while the White guys weren't) and finally, the club stopped doing it. Immediately, the White guys left, the clubgoers were the lesbians, Black and Hispanics. The end result? The music got better (heh, heh) because it had people who could dance and the lead dj, Tim Rivers, who went on to become known as a "dj's dj" because he actually knew music (had a degree In music) and wouldn't play just the standard drivel, blew the roof off the standard disco fare that was played in clubs. He was a rarity, though. That was the only bar you heard Stevie Wonder, The Doobie Brothers, and Luther Vandross (and it was only 1976!) But I digress.
    By 1978, when the I-Beam was THE gay dance club, the doormen regularly turned away women on the grounds that they had open-toed shoes (just a way to keep them out) and it took hold there. However, when Trocadero Transfer opened (for the "twinkie crowd" as it was called, because it wasn't the A crowd bodybuilders that went there: it was just the 'normal' crowd, which included women) that problem never existed there. Interesting, since the I-Beam only opened two months before Trocadero. But then, in the Castro, it was the back to more of the same: Boystown. Women were not really welcome, and interestingly enough, not even that visible, now that I think about it until 1982 when one bar on 18th at Collingwood Street was reopened as a lesbian bar. The lesbians quickly felt the dismissiveness of the gay men, which was ironic, since, two years later, when AIDS was in full swing, the lesbians were taking care of those very same guys who threw shade their way just a few years earlier.
    This shouldn't be happening now, but despite all the "How could this happen? It's 2016, for Chrissakes!" howls, we are hardly much more enlightened than we were in 1976. Progress takes centuries, not decades.
    The guys who just stood by and let this happen? They were as much a part of the problem as the doormen. Inclusiveness is still an issue between gay men and gay women (and transvestites and transgenders, for that matter).


    I believe that the issue of inclusiveness here is simply ill-at-place.

    Quite a few gay bars, clubs, disco clubs, etc., functioned as your basic, daily cruising grounds. You could have socialized at the neighborhood coffee shop (w or w/o the Bucks) with anyone whom you wanted to socialize with. But quite a few guys went out to those clubs first and foremost to hook up with other like-minded guys. Having women around was simply counterproductive in this specific environment.

    I fully understand that no one likes to be excluded on ANY pretext, no matter how legitimate and logical it may be. And, I imagine that there are various laws, and ordinances to eliminate any exclusion which is perceived to be discriminatory, and hence, illegal.

    Which brings us to the limits of the powers of legislation. We cannot legislate against the force of gravity. However, we can let legislate though that everyone can enter into every public commercial space. Once everyone is in there, the reason for the existence of this particular place is largely gone, and we have all been deprived of an environment which had fulfilled a specific role in our lives. The life moves on very quickly, and the new ways are created to create essentially exclusive environments that will continue in one form or the other simply because there is a genuine human need to spend some time of our lives in such exclusionary environments.

    SC
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    Jun 03, 2016 7:29 AM GMT


    "And nothing can ever be the same..."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2016 10:19 PM GMT
    A LOT of gay guys bring their female friends and female coworkers to gay clubs. I can't tell you how many times I've heard gay guys talk about having a "girls night out" at the club with their friend Kate, Brook, Michele, etc So it kind of is everyone's fault. lol.
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    Jun 03, 2016 11:34 PM GMT
    I don't mind women in gay clubs. What I mind is their obnoxious behavior when they are drunk (read bachelorette parties) or acting all stupid because a guy is dancing on the bar in his Andrew Christian undies like they haven't seen a guy in underwear. Then they've worn out their welcome as far as I'm concerned.
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    Jun 04, 2016 12:44 AM GMT
    Not4u said
    I don't mind women in gay clubs. What I mind is their obnoxious behavior when they are drunk (read bachelorette parties)...

    They don't even have to be drunk to be obnoxious. Our only gay club for many miles was near 3 universities, and the female students would sometimes visit in noisy, screeching packs, at least partly for the apparent novelty and thrill of being inside a wicked gay place. These students were mainly from the conservative and straight-laced upper-Midwest, their first time living away from home and parental control.

    They'd also sometimes bring along a guy, perhaps a BF, I dunno. And most of these fellas would look very unhappy & uncomfortable with the experience. Sullen & frowning, some would lose no opportunity to loudly declare to the rest of us: "I'm not gay!" Like we were gonna jump and rape him right there on the bar or something. We could care less about them.

    But I was kinda of 2 minds on this. Yes, they were a distraction and an annoyance in "our" club. But it was also a possible opportunity for some positive PR with these straights. After all, they'll always out-number us at the ballot box.

    Better to have friends & allies, or at least not fierce opponents. Show us in a friendly, familiar social setting that young college kids can relate to and feel comfortable with. To help dispel the negative images & notions many of them undoubtedly would have.

    In fact, we had the best DJ and the largest and best dance floor in the whole area for about 100 miles, with top notch lighting effects and a wall-sized projection screen for the music videos. The straight clubs paled in comparison, just tired CW stuff that many of the college kids didn't want. Which further made the students want to come to our club. Many of them loved our gay scene, better than any other local options they had. As I said, good PR for our brand. I was always cordial to them when the occasion arose, never hostile.