You Probably Never Knew How Silly You Sounded While Trying To Say The Names Of These Cities

  • metta

    Posts: 39165

    Jun 03, 2016 4:47 PM GMT

    You Probably Never Knew How Silly You Sounded While Trying To Say The Names Of These Cities

    http://www.omgfacts.com/theworld/18008/You-Probably-Never-Knew-How-Silly-You-Sounded-While-Trying-To-Say-The-Names-Of-These-Cities
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2016 10:51 PM GMT
    Much more likely for an American to visit than some of these, and much more unpronounceable for an American, would be KĂžbenhavn (Copenhagen)
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    Jun 03, 2016 11:13 PM GMT
    Why would anyone expect someone who isn't from a particular place know how the locals pronounce the place name? There is nothing wrong with someone saying Melbourne. After all that is how it is spelled even though natives May pronounce it Melbrn.

    How citizens from my hometown pronounce the city's name depends on the neighborhood they are from. There is no one correct way to say it.
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    Jun 03, 2016 11:28 PM GMT
    Here's some more in the US, all places I've visited:

    Pierre, State Capital of South Dakota:
    Not Pee-air, like the French name, but Pier, like a dock.

    Another in South Dakota, Belle Fourche:
    Not Bell-forshe, but Bell-foush, without the "r"

    Of course we all know about N'Awlins, and Loo-eh-ville.

    Worcester, Massachusetts:
    Not Wor-chester, but Wuh-ster (or Wuh-stah if you have a traditional New England accent)

    Heber Springs, Arkansas:
    Not Heb-er Springs, but Hee-ber Springs

    Boerne, Texas (NW of San Antonio):
    Not Born or Born-ee, but Burn-ee, dropping the "o" (sounds the same as Bernie Sanders)

    What US ones do YOU know?

    [Please excuse my homemade phonetic spellings]
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    Jun 04, 2016 2:14 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidHere's some more in the US, all places I've visited:

    Pierre, State Capital of South Dakota:
    Not Pee-air, like the French name, but Pier, like a dock.

    Another in South Dakota, Belle Fourche:
    Not Bell-forshe, but Bell-foush, without the "r"

    Of course we all know about N'Awlins, and Loo-eh-ville.

    Worcester, Massachusetts:
    Not Wor-chester, but Wuh-ster (or Wuh-stah if you have a traditional New England accent)

    Heber Springs, Arkansas:
    Not Heb-er Springs, but Hee-ber Springs

    Boerne, Texas (NW of San Antonio):
    Not Born or Born-ee, but Burn-ee, dropping the "o" (sounds the same as Bernie Sanders)

    What US ones do YOU know?

    [Please excuse my homemade phonetic spellings]


    Actually that would be Bell-foosh and not Bell-foush.
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    Jun 04, 2016 3:20 AM GMT
    No native New Orleanian says N'Awlins.
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    Jun 04, 2016 12:06 PM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    Art_Deco saidHere's some more in the US, all places I've visited:

    Pierre, State Capital of South Dakota:
    Not Pee-air, like the French name, but Pier, like a dock.

    Another in South Dakota, Belle Fourche:
    Not Bell-forshe, but Bell-foush, without the "r"

    Of course we all know about N'Awlins, and Loo-eh-ville.

    Worcester, Massachusetts:
    Not Wor-chester, but Wuh-ster (or Wuh-stah if you have a traditional New England accent)

    Heber Springs, Arkansas:
    Not Heb-er Springs, but Hee-ber Springs

    Boerne, Texas (NW of San Antonio):
    Not Born or Born-ee, but Burn-ee, dropping the "o" (sounds the same as Bernie Sanders)

    What US ones do YOU know?

    [Please excuse my homemade phonetic spellings]

    Actually that would be Bell-foosh and not Bell-foush.

    Agreed. I noted my homemade phonetic-spelling wasn't good. Foosh is better.

    BTW, I've tent camped there off my motorcycle a number of times. In August over a 10-year period. It's about 20 miles from Sturgis, South Dakota. Camping within the immediate Sturgis area is a crazy, wild zoo, with over 500,000 bikers during the annual rally. And much more expensive & crowded in the Sturgis campgrounds, with loud partying all night. Bell Foosh had a quiet campground run by a fellow biker at a nice price. I'm not sure if it's still in operation, it was kinda a private word-of-mouth thing, almost invitation-only, they don't get much Internet listing.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Jun 04, 2016 3:17 PM GMT
    Baltimore is often pronounced "Bawlmer" by most of its natives. That city has an odd, unusual accent that is quite southern even though it is considered an older, northern city.icon_smile.gif
  • carew28

    Posts: 661

    Jun 05, 2016 9:02 PM GMT
    In Western Massachusetts, Worcester is pronounced "Wister". It's the folks from Boston who pronounce it "Wustah".

    Some other Massachusetts pronunciation peculiarities:
    Leicester is pronounced "Lester".
    Quincy is pronounced "Quinsy".
    Holyoke is pronounced "Hol-ee-oke.
    Billerica is pronounced "Billrica".
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Jun 07, 2016 3:20 PM GMT
    In Milwaukee, there are two suburbs Wauwatosa and Waukesha that many people have a hard time pronouncing. In Buffalo, there are two suburbs Cheektowaga and Tonawanda that baffle many out of town visitors.
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    Jun 07, 2016 5:26 PM GMT
    Quite a few decades ago the legendary Walter Cronkite of the CBS Evening News on TV was reading a story about strange lights in the sky that some contended were UFOs. They were spotted over Lake Hopatcong in northwestern New Jersey. I knew the area well, used to boat there, and fished from an outlet, the Muscanetcong River (Muhss-ka-net-kong).

    Well, Cronkite evidently hadn't been briefed nor practiced the correct pronunciation. He stumbled over "Hop-at-cong". The actual pronunciation (a Native American word that the colonists converted) is "Ah-pat-cong, spoken very quickly. The US is full of these odd pronunciations. Some, like in New Jersey, a legacy of earlier Indian and colonial Dutch names.