thinking about adopting a rescue

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 08, 2016 5:42 AM GMT
    Hi, it's been a long time since I've had a dog at my house.

    I've waited 4 years since my dog's passing to even consider getting a new dog. My dilemma is this - I feel really depressed about the horrible living conditions most of the candidates I've been looking at come from. I'm having a really hard time narrowing down my choice. I live on a 30 acre farm, my decision was to adopt upto two rescues, preferably adult dogs.. that no one wanted or lived thru horrible conditions. I want to give them a second chance.

    I was appalled at the treatment some of these stray dogs that I witnessed first hand while I was on my trip to India. I found a local organization here that works with a rescue center over there that brings dogs that have been hit my cars / abused and gives these dogs a second lease on life.

    Everything I've done in this life I feel I failed, except loving my dog.. he died of cancer and it hurt a lot to lose him. I feel at least make some sort of difference by adopting. Ive never adopted before.

    So who gets chosen? its heart breaking, there's 20 candidates. Some were rescued by Air Canada pilots traveling to China. Some were destined to be slaughtered in the meat trade / torture rituals.

    I fell in the love with the first dog I saw, he was hit in the head by a car and he survived and underwent an operation. He's never lived in a home, only on the streets of Delhi.

    Another was rescued from China's culling / torture dog meat festival. I just can't...

    And then there's people in Canada that abandoned the pets they willfully adopted / bought and decide they don't want them anymore.

    Why do I feel so horrible? As a human being I just want to crawl in a hole from shame and just die.

    People really are shitty.
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    Jun 08, 2016 12:20 PM GMT
    You've articulated my own ethical dilemma, applicable to both shelter adoptions and breeder and pet store purchases - how to choose? I certainly couldn't play God, dictating which animal definitely got to live. I admire the balls of people who can.

    My way around that was that I was gifted first one, then another dog as the first's companion. I'd never met either, they each just arrived, like mail order brides, and the temperament of each was completely different from the other, and I love both equally.

    Perhaps your best course is to let the choice be made for you.

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    Jun 08, 2016 12:41 PM GMT
    You might consider yourself a "failure" in some respects (paraphrasing you here), but in my book you're a WINNER. You're 10X a better human being than many of us. Whatever you decide, you've already done a great service to these forgotten gifts from God.
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    Jun 08, 2016 12:52 PM GMT
    I truly believe pets choose us...let the right dog or dogs pick you. If you stay open and loving you'll know immediately. I chose one rescue because out of all of the dogs I looked at, she immediately rolled over on her back and wanted belly rubs. She was mean and ferocious to other dogs, but she was amazingly gentle and loving to people and children. I would love to rescue every dog but it's impossible (although my dream would be to have a huge rescue organization with lots of outdoor space).
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    Jun 08, 2016 1:36 PM GMT
    -make sure you have the facilities to house the animals. In other words some dogs need to kept away from property; horses, goats. The animal(s) has its limitations and you would be introducing stress to expect otherwise. Match the situation and the animal and adjust your expectations.
    -make sure you have the money, time and physical presence to take care of the dogs. For example they still need vaccinations. You have to take care of them for weather to cold or hot. and you have to do this for the next 10years.

    just get one replacement animal for the previous dog your familiar with. if realistically that is all you can care for.
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    Jun 08, 2016 2:06 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidYou've articulated my own ethical dilemma, applicable to both shelter adoptions and breeder and pet store purchases - how to choose? I certainly couldn't play God, dictating which animal definitely got to live. I admire the balls of people who can.


    Nothing hard about this decision for me -- go with a rescued dog.
    If you buy a dog that's been bred for money, you are doing what?.....validating that bogus profit-making venture of producing dogs when we already have more dogs than there are homes for.
    You are voting for more breeding.....like throwing gas on a fire.
    That's the difference.

    Don't shop. Adopt!

  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Jun 08, 2016 2:45 PM GMT
    I have 2 dogs --- one from a breeder (Mango) and the other one is a rescue dog (Romeo). I love them both equally, but I can tell you that the rescue dog is just so special in so many ways. I have owned many dogs in my life, but Romeo is the first rescue dog. I have never had a more loyal, loving, totally sweet dog as him. It took a while to get him to trust because I think he was abused early on in his life. I got him at around 1 year old. Friends of mine who also have rescue dogs have similar stories, and they say that rescue dogs are special because they appreciate so much that someone came along to love them and rescue them from the life they had --- and they will be forever grateful. If I ever go to adopt a dog again, I won't even think twice, it will be a rescue dog.
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    Jun 08, 2016 4:04 PM GMT
    ^^^^^I whole heartedly agree - rescue dogs seem to have a huge dose of loving gratitude for their new owners. I've had a number of rescues and the grateful attitude and love these dogs show - every day in so many ways - makes my life so much richer. I usually have two dogs at a time and find it no more work than having just one. This way, they are company for each other during times I have to be away during the day.
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    Jun 08, 2016 4:24 PM GMT
    It is heartwarming to see someone loving dogs as much i you do ..
    I volunteer twice a week in a shelter for abused animal in Atlanta , my dogs always have been rescues , my parents dogs always have been rescues , they for sure are the best , it makes such a difference to an animal to be rescued by a loving person ...
    Monkey is my last rescue , he arrived at the shelter after being abused for the first 9 months of his life . by his first owner , beaten and almost choked to death until the next door neighbour realise what was happening and called the police ..

    He took me 4 months before i could take him in public , he still has moment of extreme shyness and fear around excessive noise , but with my and my father's patience ( my dad babysit him when i am in the U.S ) , he is growing slowly but surely out from his bad memories
    A rescued dog needs lot of love , and reading your words , that rescue you will adopt will be a very lucky one !!
    Don't hesitate anymore , adopt a rescue !!


  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jun 08, 2016 5:07 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidI have 2 dogs --- one from a breeder (Mango) and the other one is a rescue dog (Romeo). I love them both equally, but I can tell you that the rescue dog is just so special in so many ways. I have owned many dogs in my life, but Romeo is the first rescue dog. I have never had a more loyal, loving, totally sweet dog as him. It took a while to get him to trust because I think he was abused early on in his life. I got him at around 1 year old. Friends of mine who also have rescue dogs have similar stories, and they say that rescue dogs are special because they appreciate so much that someone came along to love them and rescue them from the life they had --- and they will be forever grateful. If I ever go to adopt a dog again, I won't even think twice, it will be a rescue dog.

    I could have written this. After six purebred English Setters, adopted from either show or hunting AKC breeders (pet quality), I discovered at about age 1 that my latest, Wembley, was one of those dogs that just needs a dog buddy. My partner spotted an Irish Setter of about the same age in a rescue facility so we adopted him. Rothko. He had been an outdoor dog only eating shit food (Old Roy), and had never been trained or groomed. I groom my own dogs but I couldn't get him to let me mess with his paws (normal) so I took him to a groomer to do only that. The minute they put him in a cage he went from being a gregarious lunk to a terrified, cowering, withdrawn animal. All I could figure was he remembered being abandoned and caged. So I got him out quick. And he never leaves my side. They definitely retain the memory of unhappy circumstances and thus attach to you in a way that will melt your heart.

    If you can't choose, contact a rescue organization that pulls dogs from kill shelters and ask them to be on the lookout for dogs whose time is running out. You'll be helping them and indirectly helping other dogs that they rescue. And be sure to tell them you want two so they can factor that in.
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    Jun 08, 2016 10:50 PM GMT
    Beaux said
    eagermuscle saidYou've articulated my own ethical dilemma, applicable to both shelter adoptions and breeder and pet store purchases - how to choose? I certainly couldn't play God, dictating which animal definitely got to live. I admire the balls of people who can.


    Nothing hard about this decision for me -- go with a rescued dog.
    If you buy a dog that's been bred for money, you are doing what?.....validating that bogus profit-making venture of producing dogs when we already have more dogs than there are homes for.
    You are voting for more breeding.....like throwing gas on a fire.
    That's the difference.

    Don't shop. Adopt!


    You missed the point, I should have been more clear.

    Of COURSE given the choice between adopting or purchasing most people would publicly advocate shelter adoptions, as if bred dogs, even less sellable ones with possible shelters in their futures, don't deserve an equal chance at life or love, much less existence.

    Saying DON'T shelter adopt would as un-PC as being FOR world hunger.

    Publicly condemning even the best breeders, who often exist primarily to perpetuate the pure lines of breeds, is a pretty safe pastime.

    NO ONE here is saying don't shelter adopt. (Who'd dare?) No one on this thread needs to proselytize about the merits of adopting unwanted animals.

    My point isn't whether shelter adopting is a more ethical decision. It's this: "How do you pick one dog, leaving the others behind, REGARDLESS of where you get it?"

    THAT underscores the OP's ethical dilemma, his own "Sophie's Choice," his not-so-unique personal hell.


    This thread was about about coping with not being able to save everyone, and man's inhumanity to animal through torture, neglect and abandonment. Please don't diminish the OP's clear intent by turning this into yet another hate thread against people who choose reputable breeders. (Unwanted CHILDREN should get such sympathy.)

    Also while I'm at it on the subject of how to choose, regardless of from where - what makes you a better person, and which dog are you better serving - the friendliest, best socialized dog you "click" with, or the shyest and/or neediest? My dogs have wildly different personalities yet I love both unconditionally.
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    Jun 08, 2016 11:22 PM GMT
    Painted saidI've waited 4 years since my dog's passing to even consider getting a new dog...I live on a 30 acre farm, my decision was to adopt upto two rescues, preferably adult dogs..

    On a separate note, I want to commend OP for recognizing and acknowledging his limitations, and everyone else for not criticizing him about how he could let his emotions prevent him from saving dogs for 4 years, and how he'd only adopt two dogs despite living on 30 acres.

    My cousin, a nurse, lives on a 25 acre spread outside Atlanta by herself, with two jobs, and is so big into animal rescue that she has in addition to enough other animals to stock a petting zoo A DOZEN DOGS. Commendable? They're penned outdoors day and night (in what I hope is a very large pen or corral but I haven't seen it), tended to by her alone.

    Given her schedule, EACH DOG GETS TWO MINUTES OF HER TIME A DAY.

    That's it.

    No other human interaction.

    Only the company of eleven other dogs in the fenced outdoor pen.

    Strikes me as an inhumane situation where perhaps even euthanization of the animals in the absence of appropriate intervention would be the kinder outcome, a situation where an animal advocate with even the best intentions can be doing more harm than good.


  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Jun 09, 2016 2:04 AM GMT
    So who gets chosen?


    The problem with this is that you can't not choose. No choosing is a choice, delay is a choice, indecision is a choice. Choosing one dog or two dogs, you will be leaving some out. Choosing no dogs, you will be leaving all of them out. You have a limited amount of time and every second you spend with no dogs, is seconds those dogs are spending in whatever conditions you are attempting to rescue them from.

    You have to make a hard decision because it's always going to be a hard decision. You may be having a hard time making a choice, i understand that, but understand the time you are spending having a hard time making your choice is much harder for dogs that are waiting for more spaces to open up.

    If you are sure you want a dog or dogs pick them today. You will always be rescuing only the number you pick and leaving the rest to fate no matter when or who you pick. The indecision is just some sort of self guilt masturbation that is helping no one. There is no right or wrong answer other than to not answer promptly.

    Good luck, i am sure you will find two happy dogs.




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    Jun 09, 2016 2:22 AM GMT
    eagermuscle said
    Beaux said
    eagermuscle saidYou've articulated my own ethical dilemma, applicable to both shelter adoptions and breeder and pet store purchases - how to choose? I certainly couldn't play God, dictating which animal definitely got to live. I admire the balls of people who can.


    Nothing hard about this decision for me -- go with a rescued dog.
    If you buy a dog that's been bred for money, you are doing what?.....validating that bogus profit-making venture of producing dogs when we already have more dogs than there are homes for.
    You are voting for more breeding.....like throwing gas on a fire.
    That's the difference.

    Don't shop. Adopt!


    You missed the point, I should have been more clear.

    Of COURSE given the choice between adopting or purchasing most people would publicly advocate shelter adoptions, as if bred dogs, even less sellable ones with possible shelters in their futures, don't deserve an equal chance at life or love, much less existence.

    Saying DON'T shelter adopt would as un-PC as being FOR world hunger.

    Publicly condemning even the best breeders, who often exist primarily to perpetuate the pure lines of breeds, is a pretty safe pastime.

    NO ONE here is saying don't shelter adopt. (Who'd dare?) No one on this thread needs to proselytize about the merits of adopting unwanted animals.

    My point isn't whether shelter adopting is a more ethical decision. It's this: "How do you pick one dog, leaving the others behind, REGARDLESS of where you get it?"

    THAT underscores the OP's ethical dilemma, his own "Sophie's Choice," his not-so-unique personal hell.


    This thread was about about coping with not being able to save everyone, and man's inhumanity to animal through torture, neglect and abandonment. Please don't diminish the OP's clear intent by turning this into yet another hate thread against people who choose reputable breeders. (Unwanted CHILDREN should get such sympathy.)

    Also while I'm at it on the subject of how to choose, regardless of from where - what makes you a better person, and which dog are you better serving - the friendliest, best socialized dog you "click" with, or the shyest and/or neediest? My dogs have wildly different personalities yet I love both unconditionally.



    There is no such thing as a "reputable breeder" as long as there are homeless dogs being killed. What kind of person keeps breeding more and more animals when they're fully aware that millions are killed each year due to overpopulation? A person who is hungry for MONEY....that's the kind. And please stop with this "preserving the purebreds" bullshit. Purebreds = Inbreds. If we inbred humans there would be a huge public outcry, but for some reason we think it's okay to do it to animals. Not to mention, inbred dogs have much more health problems than mixed breeds. And many of these breeds suffer their entire lives so we can have these designer features. The world would be a better place if we outlawed inbreeding entirely.
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    Jun 09, 2016 3:35 AM GMT
    I hear ya man. Just over 1 yr since we put Watson down. My son and I went to a shelter 2 weeks ago, where they had 8, 8 week old shepherd cross mutts. The mom was rescued from the north while pregnant. Elizabeth was a shy, timid little ( big) bundle, while her little bro was a fiend and filled with the devil. I wanted them all. It is highly unlikely I will ever have another dog... Waty was the best!
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    Jun 09, 2016 1:19 PM GMT
    I've had 3 dogs in my life, all were rescues of some sort. 2 from organizations, another from a family that was moving overseas.

    The 2 from organizations I happened by their adoption days at a petstore, and absolutely fell in love with them.

    Don't be depressed about what you can't do, be joyful with what you can do.

    Saving 1 life by making a decision is better than not saving any through inaction.
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    Jun 09, 2016 1:34 PM GMT
    Radd said

    There is no such thing as a "reputable breeder" as long as there are homeless dogs being killed. What kind of person keeps breeding more and more animals when they're fully aware that millions are killed each year due to overpopulation?

    Yes, let's save all the children before having any more.

    What kind of person places a premium on perpetuating their own genes to the point of getting in vitro fertilization when there are millions of homeless children around the world facing starvation, abuse and death?

    Until every child is saved, pregnant women should be subjected to internationally sanctioned abortion and to further reduce the birth rate, everyone over the age of 20 should be sterilized.

    Can we now shift the focus back to the OP? (To which I think badbug's response was the best and most on-point, to wit: don't let your emotions incapacitate you to the point of inaction.)

    I'm not going to engage you in this thread anymore 'cause your new profile picture's kinda hot.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Jun 09, 2016 5:04 PM GMT
    This is what Romeo looked like "Pre-Rescue"...

    IMG_0508_zpsmzxbku9o.jpg

    I immediately took him to the Vet to get a checkup, make sure he had all his shots, and have their groomer give him a clearly much needed "Spa Day" Makeover. The groomer told me she thought it might be the first bath he had ever had his entire life. Thankfully, she sent me a picture during the process. Romeo did NOT look happy...

    IMG_0492_zpsnf4dp9fv.jpg

    When I returned to the Vet later that day, I could not believe the transformation....

    IMG_0506_zpsbcmbgry4.jpg

    As I was back home that night making some dinner in the kitchen, I looked up and this is what I saw looking back at me from the couch...

    IMG_0507_zpsqojbmlm5.jpg

    I knew right then and there that I was hopelessly in LOVE. I had found my Romeo.
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    Jun 09, 2016 5:46 PM GMT
    Radd said
    eagermuscle said
    Beaux said
    eagermuscle said







    There is no such thing as a "reputable breeder" as long as there are homeless dogs being killed. What kind of person keeps breeding more and more animals when they're fully aware that millions are killed each year due to overpopulation? A person who is hungry for MONEY....that's the kind. And please stop with this "preserving the purebreds" bullshit. Purebreds = Inbreds. If we inbred humans there would be a huge public outcry, but for some reason we think it's okay to do it to animals. Not to mention, inbred dogs have much more health problems than mixed breeds. And many of these breeds suffer their entire lives so we can have these designer features. The world would be a better place if we outlawed inbreeding entirely.


    Yes, there are a lot of silly breeds - designed for "looks" - that should never have been created - Like all those "purse-size" dogs that women like - that are hardly dogs at all. But if someone really wants a pure breed - because they know what the dog will be like when grown, or they know the disposition of the dog - or want a pet to hunt with - or go swimming with - or for whatever reason, good for them. Not everyone has to adopt a dog from a shelter. It is not the breeders that overpopulate the world with no-longer wanted dogs and cats, but the pet shops and puppy mills, and irresponsible pet owners who don't sterilize their pets. No one who pays $500 - $1,000 - $2,000 for a pure bred dog from a breeder, is going to wind up abandoning that dog - breeders do not contribute to the number of shelter dogs.

  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jun 09, 2016 6:08 PM GMT
    Puppenjunge said
    Radd said
    eagermuscle said
    Beaux said
    eagermuscle said







    There is no such thing as a "reputable breeder" as long as there are homeless dogs being killed. What kind of person keeps breeding more and more animals when they're fully aware that millions are killed each year due to overpopulation? A person who is hungry for MONEY....that's the kind. And please stop with this "preserving the purebreds" bullshit. Purebreds = Inbreds. If we inbred humans there would be a huge public outcry, but for some reason we think it's okay to do it to animals. Not to mention, inbred dogs have much more health problems than mixed breeds. And many of these breeds suffer their entire lives so we can have these designer features. The world would be a better place if we outlawed inbreeding entirely.


    Yes, there are a lot of silly breeds - designed for "looks" - that should never have been created - Like all those "purse-size" dogs that women like - that are hardly dogs at all. But if someone really wants a pure breed - because they know what the dog will be like when grown, or they know the disposition of the dog - or want a pet to hunt with - or go swimming with - or for whatever reason, good for them. Not everyone has to adopt a dog from a shelter. It is not the breeders that overpopulate the world with no-longer wanted dogs and cats, but the pet shops and puppy mills, and irresponsible pet owners who don't sterilize their pets. No one who pays $500 - $1,000 - $2,000 for a pure bred dog from a breeder, is going to wind up abandoning that dog - breeders do not contribute to the number of shelter dogs.


    Purebreds have their place. I attached to English Setters because they're chill but active, prefer to be with you so they never run away, I love watching them hunt (I don't hunt) and detach from the human world and let their instincts take over, love the water and are absolutely beautiful medium-large dogs. One was from an English Setter rescue organization, one from hunting stock, one from a friend, and three from a kennel that breads show dogs. That said my Irish Setter is not AKC and is what I've heard referred to as a "Heart Dog," or a dog that grabs your heart and won't let go. I heard his owner was in tears when he surrendered him because of illness. Btw, Radd, my contract with the AKC breeders is that if I were to ever want to breed one of them, I would return the dog to Seattle with the kennel making the match after achieving a "Championship" status and that the kennel would have control of puppy placement including pick of the litter. About a two year process. I've never not neutered any of my dogs. Don't dis the AKC. Yes they've distorted some breeds but they're working to correct a lot of that (we all learn). And they're diligent about routing genetic issues out of the breed. I'm a fan of adoption from shelters (Rothko and Duke) and specific breed rescue, but the reputable side of the dog industry should be appreciated. They're dog lovers, too.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Jun 09, 2016 6:15 PM GMT
    Puppenjunge said
    Radd said
    eagermuscle said
    Beaux said
    eagermuscle said







    There is no such thing as a "reputable breeder" as long as there are homeless dogs being killed. What kind of person keeps breeding more and more animals when they're fully aware that millions are killed each year due to overpopulation? A person who is hungry for MONEY....that's the kind.



    I don't think this is a fair analogy of breeders. Granted, I don't condone puppy mills and things like that, and there are certainly breeders out there who are in it just for the money. However, there are many reputable breeders out there too. I know that the purebred dog I have came from a very reputable breaded with a great reputation. I wanted a pure bred Shih-tzu because I wanted a dog that did not shed and was a certain size. Before they allowed me to adopt one of their puppies, I had to fill out a lengthy questionnaire/application and was given a list of items I had to have on hand when the breeder arrived with the puppy at my home. They needed to know that I lived in an environment conducive to having a dog, and that I had the tools needed to care for and raise a puppy. It was only then that they agreed to let me adopt the puppy. There are all kinds of reasons why people go to breeders and want a purebred dog, and I see nothing wrong with this if that is their choice.
  • Aleco_Graves

    Posts: 708

    Jun 09, 2016 7:10 PM GMT
    In september i'll be moving from an apartment to a 800 square metre property.

    I'd really love to adopt a rescue or two and make this new house my home, but my partners attitude to adopting is very different.

    He wants to buy 2 thoroughbred schnauzers, and possibly have them breed later.

    I tried to convince him about why breeding shouldnt be encouraged by buying dogs, or actually breeding. He actually knows all of this AS HE IS A VET.

    His reply was: He just wants his 2 schnauzers, then i can get whatever I want.

    His reasons for getting them seem to be based on their looks and tempremanent, hes dead set on getting them.

    So hes already decided on hypothetical dogs HE HASNT MET YET.

    The whole thing feels wrong, superficial and elitest, I feel like he's objectifying dogs, turning these "Purebreds" into designer pieces that are must haves.

    Very happy that people like the OP do exist. Frankly a little jealous on your choice between 20 dogs!
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    Jun 09, 2016 7:22 PM GMT
    Aleco_Graves saidIn september i'll be moving from an apartment to a 800 square metre property.

    I'd really love to adopt a rescue or two and make this new house my home, but my partners attitude to adopting is very different.

    He wants to buy 2 thoroughbred schnauzers, and possibly have them breed later.

    I tried to convince him about why breeding shouldnt be encouraged by buying dogs, or actually breeding. He actually knows all of this AS HE IS A VET.

    His reply was: He just wants his 2 schnauzers, then i can get whatever I want.

    His reasons for getting them seem to be based on their looks and tempremanent, hes dead set on getting them.

    So hes already decided on hypothetical dogs HE HASNT MET YET.

    The whole thing feels wrong, superficial and elitest, I feel like he's objectifying dogs, turning these "Purebreds" into designer pieces that are must haves.

    Very happy that people like the OP do exist. Frankly a little jealous on your choice between 20 dogs!


    If this is your partner's only weakness, you are a lucky young man. (He might have wanted to keep a pet monkey in the house - or a screeching parrot.)
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    Jun 10, 2016 6:10 AM GMT
    Puppenjunge said
    Radd said
    eagermuscle said
    Beaux said
    eagermuscle said







    There is no such thing as a "reputable breeder" as long as there are homeless dogs being killed. What kind of person keeps breeding more and more animals when they're fully aware that millions are killed each year due to overpopulation? A person who is hungry for MONEY....that's the kind. And please stop with this "preserving the purebreds" bullshit. Purebreds = Inbreds. If we inbred humans there would be a huge public outcry, but for some reason we think it's okay to do it to animals. Not to mention, inbred dogs have much more health problems than mixed breeds. And many of these breeds suffer their entire lives so we can have these designer features. The world would be a better place if we outlawed inbreeding entirely.


    Yes, there are a lot of silly breeds - designed for "looks" - that should never have been created - Like all those "purse-size" dogs that women like - that are hardly dogs at all. But if someone really wants a pure breed - because they know what the dog will be like when grown, or they know the disposition of the dog - or want a pet to hunt with - or go swimming with - or for whatever reason, good for them. Not everyone has to adopt a dog from a shelter. It is not the breeders that overpopulate the world with no-longer wanted dogs and cats, but the pet shops and puppy mills, and irresponsible pet owners who don't sterilize their pets. No one who pays $500 - $1,000 - $2,000 for a pure bred dog from a breeder, is going to wind up abandoning that dog - breeders do not contribute to the number of shelter dogs.




    Yikes. I'm sure you believe what you're saying but I have to tell you, you are very very wrong about that. I have volunteered in the shelters and I know first hand that almost half the dogs there are "purebreds." Rich people are some of the worst at taking care of their dogs because they consider them just another accessory. I've seen them angrily walk the dog in and hand the leash to the first employee they see, then turn and walk right out the door as if they're returning a broken appliance.
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    Jun 10, 2016 8:24 AM GMT
    My mother has a thing for purebred cats and they all have these smashed faces & stubby legs. They're ok but they don't seem to have the personality of many of the 'mutt' cats I've known. I've never regretted taking in 3 strays instead of going to a breeder.

    @OP: Like the other poster said, you're putting all this guilt on yourself. I can't watch those commercials with the Sarah McLaughlin song for even a second because the images are horrible. And yes, I'm putting it out of my sight and mind by changing the channel, but I can't take in any more animals. I'm doing my part already and I also didn't cause the animal crisis. Neither did you. So just pick, love the crap out of them and never look back icon_smile.gif