Piso Christ by Roman Piso with Jay Gallus

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    Jun 26, 2016 4:46 PM GMT
    One Like the Son of Man, in Revelation, is not age 33 in appearance, but one of the elderly

    From Revelation 1: 13-14
    …13and among the lampstands was One like the Son of Man, dressed in a long robe, with a golden sash around His chest.
    14The hair of His head was white like wool, as white as snow

    A man with white hair is most likely one of the elderly.
    Hair can get wooly as one ages.
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    Jun 28, 2016 12:26 AM GMT
    Seems to have had some intriguing ideas but I couldn't put this in the bibliography of the second edition of my book.
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    Jul 02, 2016 11:52 PM GMT
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    Jul 03, 2016 12:41 AM GMT
    Spartacus (Greek: Σπάρτακος Spártakos; Latin: Spartacus;[1] c. 111–71 BC) was a Thracian gladiator who, along with the Gauls Crixus, Oenomaus, Castus and Gannicus, was one of the escaped slave leaders in the Third Servile War, a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. Little is known about Spartacus beyond the events of the war, and surviving historical accounts are sometimes contradictory and may not always be reliable. However, all sources agree that he was a former gladiator and an accomplished military leader.

    This rebellion, interpreted by some as an example of oppressed people fighting for their freedom against a slave-owning oligarchy, has provided inspiration for many political thinkers, and has been featured in literature, television, and film. Although this is not contradicted by classical historians, no historical account mentions that the goal was to end slavery in the Republic, nor do any of the actions of the rebel leaders, who themselves committed numerous atrocities, seem specifically aimed at ending slavery.[2]
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    Jul 03, 2016 12:50 AM GMT
    Yes, the New Testament supposedly was written to control two populations: slaves and those who were Rome's opponents in the First Jewish-Roman War.
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    Jul 03, 2016 3:29 AM GMT
    We're going to pray before we go into the 4th and 5th video.

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    Jul 04, 2016 12:05 AM GMT
    One claim is that the gospel of Mark was written by three (maybe four) people.

    Velleius Paterculus - the father, came up with the idea

    T Flavius Sabinus

    Gaius C Piso


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    Jul 04, 2016 6:24 PM GMT
    Video 2 of 5

    Caligula was the father of Gaius Calpernius Piso -- Arius Piso
    When Gaius C. Piso started going by the name Arrius Piso, he was using a feminine version of his mother's name.
    So, Caligula who was worshiped as a living god became the biblical God who made the Virgin Mary pregnant.

    Response:

    That has a buzz score. It does show up on the buzz meter. I'm not adopting it at this point in time.
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    Jul 06, 2016 2:38 PM GMT
    Dio Chrysostom was part of the Second Sophistic school of Greek philosophers which reached its peak in the early 2nd century. He was considered as one of the most eminent of the Greek rhetoricians and sophists by the ancients who wrote about him, such as Philostratus,[11] Synesius,[12] and Photius.[13]

    academia.edu has this title: Jesus the Philosopher and Sophist. Two classical views on Christianity and Jesus: Galen and Lucian of Samosata

    Compare Chrysostom’s Discourses to the New Testament.

    Sophist: 1.a paid teacher of philosophy and rhetoric in ancient Greece, associated in popular thought with moral skepticism and specious reasoning. a person who reasons with clever but fallacious arguments

    = = =
    Dr. Ehrman why is there a connection between Christianity and sophists?
    Second, is academia.edu reputable among scholars?

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    Jul 07, 2016 2:42 AM GMT
    What advantage did the Jews gain from {being against} their wise king? It was just after that their kingdom was abolished {by Rome, in the year after Rome had four emperors}. … [He is not dead]
    because of the new laws he laid down.
    –Mara Bar Serapion, circa 170 C.E

    [Christians] are all brothers the moment they … deny the Greek gods and begin worshiping that crucified sophist and living by his laws.
    –Lucian of Samosata, circa 170 C.E.

    {A sophist during the first century and prior was a category of teachers who specialized in using the tools of philosophy and rhetoric for the purpose of teaching excellence, or virtue. With the biblical Jesus being a sophist, Christianity has evangelized excellence and virtue for millennia.}

    And, I just got back from a library. Dio's discourses seem to be good. I flipped some pages in each of the five volumes before borrowing them from the library.
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    Jul 08, 2016 7:34 PM GMT
    Dr. Ehrman
    1. Yes, Christian literary elite were influenced by the Second Sophistic; 2. I don’t really know.
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    Jul 09, 2016 11:11 PM GMT
    Dio Chrysostom and Josephus, both connected to the Flavian empire share thoughts in common. - Steefen

    Dio proceeds to what is the most important part of his address [The 12th or Olympic Discourse: or, "On Man's First Conception of God"] in which he offers a great wealth of ideas as to what is the field and function of the plastic arts [art forms that involve modeling or molding, such as sculpture and ceramics, or art involving the representation of solid objects with three-dimensional effects] and what are their limitations. He puts his thoughts on this subject into the mouth of Pheidias, who takes the specific case of his own great statue of Zeus and attempts to show that he has used all the resources of the sculptor's art in producing a worthy statue of the greatest of the gods.

    Pheidias in the course of his exposition says among other things that he took his conception of Zeus from Homer and he makes a detailed comparison between the respective capacities of poetry and sculpture to portray and represent to the decided advantage of poetry.

    No ancient writer up to Dio's time whose works are extant has given us such a full treatment of the subject plastic arts vs poetry. Not until we come to Flavius Josephus do we find such a treatment of the subject.

    Loeb Classical Library
    Dio Chrysostom
    Discourses 12-30
    p. 3
    Translated by J.W. Cohoon
    Harvard University Press, Cambridge MA
    1939 / ISBN 0-674-99374-8


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    Jul 09, 2016 11:18 PM GMT
    18.jpg

    marble-statue-of-athena-copy-of-the-stat
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    Jul 17, 2016 8:27 PM GMT
    The First Discourse on Kingship by Dio Chrysostom

    ...Next, after the gods
    the good king has regard for his fellow-men;
    he honors and loves the good,
    yet extends his care to all.
    Now, who takes better care of a herd of cattle than does the herdsman?
    Who is more helpful and better to flocks of sheep than a shepherd?
    page 11

    John 10:11
    "I am the good shepherd; the good shepherd lays down His life for the sheep."

    Hebrews 13: 20
    ... Lord Jesus, the Great Shepherd of the sheep...

    ~ ~ ~= = =~ ~ ~
    ...
    And, so, who is presumably as great a lover
    of his fellow-man as he who exercises authority
    over the greatest number of men and enjoys the highest admiration of men?
    For it would be strange if men governing beasts, wild and of another blood than theirs,
    prove more kindly to these their dependents
    than a monarch to civilized men who are of the same flesh and blood as himself.
    page 11

    The good king also believes it to be due to his position to have the larger portion,
    not of wealth or of pleasures, but
    of painstaking care and anxieties; hence,
    he is actually more fond of toil than many others are of pleasure or of wealth.
    ... he looks upon himself as being king, not for the sake of his individual self,
    but for the sake of all men.
    page 13

    Matthew 20

    …25But Jesus called them aside and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their superiors exercise authority over them. 26It shall not be this way among you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, 27and whoever wants to be first among you must be your slave

    ~ ~ ~= = =~ ~ ~
    ... They who come into his presence and behold him feel neither terror nor fear;
    but into their hearts creeps a feeling of profound respect,
    something much stronger and more powerful than fear. For
    those who fear must inevitably hate and want to escape:
    those who feel respect must linger and admire.
    page 15

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    Jul 17, 2016 9:03 PM GMT
    Mt 20:27
    and whoever wants to be first among you must be your slave

    Dio Chrysostom
    In the title "master," however, he can take no delight, nay, not even in relation to his slaves, much less to his free subjects; for he looks upon himself as being king, not for the sake of his individual self, but for the sake of all men.

    page 13 (1st Discourse on Kingship)
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    Jul 18, 2016 1:43 AM GMT
    (But I will pass over most of the details and give the clearest mark of a true king:
    he is one whom all good men can praise without compunction not only during his life
    but even afterwards.) And yet, even so, he does not himself covet the praise of
    the vulgar and the loungers about the market-place, but only that of
    the free-born and noble,
    men who would prefer to die rather than be guilty of falsehood.
    Dio Chrysostom, page 19

    And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites. For they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by men. Truly I tell you, they already have their reward.
    Jesus, Matthew 6:5
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    Jul 23, 2016 8:28 AM GMT
    18.jpg
    Dio proceeds to what is the most important part of his address [The 12th or Olympic Discourse: or, "On Man's First Conception of God"] in which he offers a great wealth of ideas as to what is the field and function of the plastic arts [art forms that involve modeling or molding, such as sculpture and ceramics, or art involving the representation of solid objects with three-dimensional effects] and what are their limitations. He puts his thoughts on this subject into the mouth of Pheidias, who takes the specific case of his own great statue of Zeus and attempts to show that he has used all the resources of the sculptor's art in producing a worthy statue of the greatest of the gods.

    Pheidias in the course of his exposition says among other things that he took his conception of Zeus from Homer and he makes a detailed comparison between the respective capacities of poetry and sculpture to portray and represent to the decided advantage of poetry.

    ~ ~ ~
    So a two dimensional picture is not worth a thousand words — a sculpture, not worth 1,500 words?
    ~ ~ ~
    Homer wrote more than 1,500 words about Zeus (God).
    ~ ~ ~
    Acts 17: 16
    While Paul was waiting for them in Athens, he was greatly distressed to see that the city was full of idols.

    And

    Therefore, my dear friends, flee from idolatry.
    1 Corinthians 10: 14
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    Jul 25, 2016 7:02 PM GMT
    On Jesus' Long Hair

    Most philosophers and most of the pagan gods were depicted with long hair.
    Dio Chrysostom, the practical philosopher who lived in the first century, told his readers that he and other philosophers wore their hair long (Oration Thirty-Five, vol.III. pp.391, 401 Loeb ed.).
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    Aug 07, 2016 5:54 PM GMT
    But Jesus remained silent and made no reply.
    Again the high priest questioned Him,
    "Are you the Christ, the Son of the Blessed One?"
    "Iam," said Jesus, "and you will see the Son of Man
    sitting at the right hand of Power and coming with the clouds of heaven."
    At this, the high priest tore his clothes and declared,
    Why do we need any more witnesses?
    You have heard the blasphemy. What is your verdict?"
    And they all condemned Him as deserving of death.
    Mark 14: 61-64

    Would you really put an offspring of an Earthling species at the right hand of the creator of
    billions of stars and planets?
    The Milky Way alone has 100 billion stars--not all Sun-sized.


    Luke 1: 33
    Luke 22;29-30
    John 18: 37

    http://www.bible-topics.com/Christ-the-King.html


    Diogenes: Are you the Alexander whom they call a bastard?
    Alexander the Great: What gave you the idea of calling me a bastard?
    Diogenes: Your mother Olympias gave me the idea when she told me Philip is not your father
    but a dragon or the god Ammon (depicted with ram horns, venerated by Libyan desert tribes) or
    some god or demigod.
    Alexander the Great: Do you think the story is true or false?
    Diogenes: It is uncertain. If you are self-controlled and know the royal art of Zeus, nothing prevents your being a son of Zeus.
    Alexander: Who imparts the art of kingship?
    Diogenes: You know the art of kingship if the words of your mother are true and you are a son of Zeus, for it is he who first and chiefly possesses this knowledge. All to whom Zeus imparts the knowledge of kingship are sons of Zeus. You would not have to learn: you would have to recall.

    The Fourth Discourse on Kingship by Dio Chrysostom
    ps 177 - 183

    Unlike Herod the Great, Jesus fits the bill of Dio Chrysostom, being a son of God/Zeus.


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    Aug 07, 2016 6:45 PM GMT
    Jesus: God provides (followers, food, clothes)
    Jesus is righteous
    Jesus in John's Gospel: The Father and I are one (like-minded)
    And again, Jesus as shepherd


    Diogenes: For mark you, Minos is said to have been the most righteous man in the world. Once more, when he says that kings are "nurtured by Zeus" and "dear unto Zeus," do you think that he means any other nurture than the teaching and instruction which I called divine? Can anyone, therefore, who is a friend of Zeus and is like-minded with him by any possibility conceive any unrighteous desire or design of what is wicked and disgraceful?

    Homer seems to answer this very question clearly also when in commending some king, he calls him a "shepherd of peoples." For the shepherd's business is simply to oversee, guard, and protect flocks.

    It is true that at times a shepherd buys and drives off many sheep; but there is a world of difference between the functions of butcher and shepherd, practically the same as between monarchy and tyranny.

    ps 187-189


    For no foolish and evil man knows himself; else Apollo would not have given as the first commandment, "Know thyself!" regarding it as the most difficult thing for every man.

    p 195
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    Aug 31, 2016 6:37 PM GMT
    Stephenoabc/SteefenWhat advantage did the Jews gain from {being against} their wise king? It was just after that their kingdom was abolished {by Rome, in the year after Rome had four emperors}. … [He is not dead]
    because of the new laws he laid down.
    –Mara Bar Serapion, circa 170 C.E

    [Christians] are all brothers the moment they … deny the Greek gods and begin worshiping that crucified sophist and living by his laws.
    –Lucian of Samosata, circa 170 C.E.

    {A sophist during the first century and prior was a category of teachers who specialized in using the tools of philosophy and rhetoric for the purpose of teaching excellence, or virtue. With the biblical Jesus being a sophist, Christianity has evangelized excellence and virtue for millennia.}


    circa 170 C.E. also?
    I'm going with 73 CE.


    Mara's letter to his son begins with: "Mara, son of Serapion, to Serapion, my son: peace." The letter was composed sometime between 73 AD and the 3rd century.[5] There were three cases when captives were taken from Samosata, in 72 AD by the Romans, in 161/162 by Parthians and in 256 by Sasanians and various scholars have presented arguments for each date.[3] Robert Van Voorst (who himself thinks the letter was composed in the second century) states that most scholars date the letter to shortly after AD 73 during the first century.[5]
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    Sep 02, 2016 7:20 PM GMT
    Therefore he finds greater pleasure in conferring benefits
    than those benefited do in receiving them,
    and in this one pleasure, he is insatiable.

    The First Discourse on Kingship by Dio Chrysostom
    p 15, line 23

    …remembering the words the Lord Jesus himself said: “It is more blessed to give than to receive.”
    Acts 20: 35