Know Any Good Recipes For Beef Burgundy and Beef Stroganoff?

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    Jun 27, 2016 1:05 AM GMT
    My Italian husband did a fairly good job making a beef stew at my request recently, that our friends also enjoyed (he made about 4 quarts for jarring). Now he's gonna make a Beef Burgundy (aka Boeuf Bourguignon) followed by Beef Stroganoff. They're rather similar, both will be over egg noodles, or potatoes more traditionally with the Burgundy, other people difference being the Burgundy red wine in the former.

    But he's never made them, being more versed in Mediterranean cuisine, while I only know them to eat them. The Internet is a great menu resource, but almost too great, with hundreds of choices. Any thoughts about some good ones? You don't have to write it all out, just links will do if you have them, or name a well-known chef's recipe and we'll find it, plus any tips you might have.

    I'll let you know how they turn out. Thanks!
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    Jun 27, 2016 12:49 PM GMT
    I probably should add, that I'd rather avoid any recipe that includes tomato sauce or tomatoes. He insisted on adding his Italian tomato meat sauce to the beef stew he made at my request recently. While it wasn't bad, I thought that spicy tomato addition was fighting the other traditional flavors that I was looking to have, rather than enhancing the stew.

    So I'm a little concerned he'll be attempting Carne Italiano Borgogna and Stroganoff italiano della Carne (or however it might be said in Italian). Instead of the classic dishes I'd really like, and can't get in most restaurants here, except for poor imitations.

    I know that might sound selfish on my part, but I'm always getting served his own Italian comfort foods, so for a change I'd enjoy some comfort foods that reflect my own non-Mediterranean heritage. If I can give him some ideas that are totally tomato-free, and without Italian spices & herbs, maybe he'll stick to the recipe.

    Plus I'll buy the red Burgundy wine myself. Otherwise I KNOW he'll substitute a Chianti or something, claiming it's all the same. But I want to stay completely authentic. I already bought the flat egg noodles myself, because he was gonna substitute 100% wheat paccheri rigati (ribbed tubes, sorta like large ziti). I asked him to save his rigati for one of his Italian dishes, and please use the egg noodles as the recipes specify.

    I'm tempted to just attempt to make them myself, but I'm a disaster as a cook. The outcome would be worse than frozen dinner versions. So again, if you can suggest classic recipes for these dishes I'd greatly appreciate it.
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    Jun 27, 2016 2:18 PM GMT
    your going to get all bent out of shape but; use inexpensive burgundy if you plan to use most of the bottle for cooking.
    if you dont frequently make the "Mediterranean" stuff everyday its going to hit or miss on what flavor(s) work for you guys. It might take a few attempts to perfect the recipe.

    Sounds like "He insisted on adding his Italian tomato meat sauce to the beef stew" you need to keep your partner out of the kitchen and man up your self and keep him out of the kitchen.
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    Jun 27, 2016 2:33 PM GMT
    pellaz saidyour going to get all bent out of shape but; use inexpensive burgundy if you plan to use most of the bottle for cooking.
    if you dont frequently eat "Mediterranean" stuff everyday its going to hit or miss on what flavor(s) work for you guys.

    make your own tomato sauce the day before and let it sit over night?

    Thanks for your reply. I usually get a mid-grade wine if I'm buying, because we do often drink the rest of it. But other times when he's doing a lot of cooking and using a lot of wine, then yeah, he grabs anything that's on sale.

    As for myself, I'll use an actual white cooking wine, that's basically undrinkable, for things like poaching eggs (keeps the whites together better). I can hardly cook at all, but I taught myself some of the egg dishes that he likes for breakfast that aren't too difficult. Although he won't attempt poached himself, his favorite to eat, seems to intimidate him, so he couldn't tutor me on that one.

    The flavor I'd like in the beef dishes is the original by which they're known. I'd rather not have Italian or Mediterranean versions of them. I get enough Italian food from him, and when we go to Italian restaurants.
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    Jun 27, 2016 2:51 PM GMT
    go for it:
    http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/muscle-bear-who-cooks-in-nothing-but-an-apron-becomes-instant-youtube-hit/#gs.wLQctV0
  • Destinharbor

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    Jun 27, 2016 3:36 PM GMT
    Art-- I like Beef Burgundy and I LOVE Beef Stroganoff but I've found something with more gravitas than the Burgundy and can be modified to make an amazing Stroganoff (by simply adding the sour cream and noodles just before serving*). And it is in the same Mediterranean flavors but with more depth. But you do have to like cooked pepper. It isn't spicy but the pepper flavor comes through and I don't think there's much better than the combination of beef and pepper. It is "Tuscan Beef" and comes from Cook's Illustrated. (myyearwithchris.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/tuscan-style-beef-stew) Takes forever to make and isn't cheap but is fun to do and always worth it. The recipe calls for Chianti but I substitute a Pinot Noir. Your Burgundy wine to drink is a better use of a good Burgundy. Or you could use Burgundy in it but I like the dryness of the Pinot when it cooks down. And I use a half and half mixture of bone-in short ribs and boneless short ribs. You want to leave the meat in big enough chunks that you still taste the meat as an individual flavor. And the marrow in the short ribs adds a nice depth to the slow cook.

    *The recipe serves probably six guys so I usually have lots of leftovers. The first meal I make with red-new potatoes par boiled and finished in the oven basted with and mixture of butter and duck fat. And a clean veg like broccoli. By the second meal, it has developed into a more even flavor and that's when I'll do the Stroganoff. And a lot of recipes for Stroganoff call for mustard which I think is completely wrong. This recipe is Super.

    There's a Beef Bourguignonne recipe at William-Sonoma that sounds good and got rave reviews.
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    Jun 27, 2016 4:19 PM GMT
    pellaz saidgo for it:
    http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/muscle-bear-who-cooks-in-nothing-but-an-apron-becomes-instant-youtube-hit/#gs.wLQctV0

    Thanks, that was fun. My husband & I were watching that vid at lunch together just now. Naturally NOT a straight restaurant.

    Although we both agreed we'd prefer a full apron with bib for ourselves. Not just because neither of us has his luscious chest, but also because of oil splatters. And if he ever has a frying pan flare up, well, there goes all that lovely chest fur. icon_eek.gif
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    Jun 27, 2016 4:32 PM GMT
    Destinharbor saidArt-- I like Beef Burgundy and I LOVE Beef Stroganoff but I've found something with more gravitas than the Burgundy and can be modified to make an amazing Stroganoff (by simply adding the sour cream and noodles just before serving*). And it is in the same Mediterranean flavors but with more depth. But you do have to like cooked pepper. It isn't spicy but the pepper flavor comes through and I don't think there's much better than the combination of beef and pepper. It is "Tuscan Beef" and comes from Cook's Illustrated. (myyearwithchris.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/tuscan-style-beef-stew) Takes forever to make and isn't cheap but is fun to do and always worth it. The recipe calls for Chianti but I substitute a Pinot Noir. Your Burgundy wine to drink is a better use of a good Burgundy. Or you could use Burgundy in it but I like the dryness of the Pinot when it cooks down. And I use a half and half mixture of bone-in short ribs and boneless short ribs. You want to leave the meat in big enough chunks that you still taste the meat as an individual flavor. And the marrow in the short ribs adds a nice depth to the slow cook.

    *The recipe serves probably six guys so I usually have lots of leftovers. The first meal I make with red-new potatoes par boiled and finished in the oven basted with and mixture of butter and duck fat. And a clean veg like broccoli. By the second meal, it has developed into a more even flavor and that's when I'll do the Stroganoff. And a lot of recipes for Stroganoff call for mustard which I think is completely wrong. This recipe is Super.

    There's a Beef Bourguignonne recipe at William-Sonoma that sounds good and got rave reviews.

    Thanks. We're out & about with our iPads right now, your nice post will get a better reply with the iMac when I return home. But he does use Williams-Sonoma recipes, that could be a good choice for him. Possibly persuading him to stick with more traditional recipes as I would prefer and not trying to turn them into Italian dishes.
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    Jun 27, 2016 9:43 PM GMT
    Save the planet and use vegetarian version of "ground beef"...... Also helps with the aged prostate.
    Beef has known carcinogens that case, develop prostate cancer.
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    Jun 28, 2016 5:47 AM GMT
    2Bnaked said
    Save the planet and use vegetarian version of "ground beef"...... Also helps with the aged prostate.
    Beef has known carcinogens that [cause], develop prostate cancer.

    Beef Burgundy and Stroganoff are made with cubed beef. I'm not sure how you could substitute a vegetarian faux ground beef. I presume you mean it would be something like a loose hamburger concoction, a kind of Sloppy Joes but over egg noodles, instead of in a hamburger bun.

    As for prostate cancer, I've already had it. Despite eating much less beef than many Americans do. In fact, I prepare a "beef" taco that's actually made with ground turkey, to avoid the fat and other issues associated with red meat. I'm kinda proud that my recipe results in a taco that will trick most people into believing it's ground beef, by taste, texture & appearance, unless I tell them.

    Of course, like many cancers a firm dietary causal relationship in my case could not be established by my doctors. Nor were any other risk factors, except for having a family history of it with my father years earlier.

    So I think I'll stick with cubed beef in these 2 dishes, a very infrequent guilty pleasure and comfort food that I doubt will kill me straight off. Others may choose for themselves. And my husband & I always tell our dinner guests beforehand what we're considering serving, because some do have dietary restrictions & preferences, to include abstaining from red meat.
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    Jun 28, 2016 7:00 AM GMT
    Destinharbor saidArt-- I like Beef Burgundy and I LOVE Beef Stroganoff but I've found something with more gravitas than the Burgundy and can be modified to make an amazing Stroganoff (by simply adding the sour cream and noodles just before serving*). And it is in the same Mediterranean flavors but with more depth. But you do have to like cooked pepper. It isn't spicy but the pepper flavor comes through and I don't think there's much better than the combination of beef and pepper. It is "Tuscan Beef" and comes from Cook's Illustrated. (myyearwithchris.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/tuscan-style-beef-stew) Takes forever to make and isn't cheap but is fun to do and always worth it. The recipe calls for Chianti but I substitute a Pinot Noir. Your Burgundy wine to drink is a better use of a good Burgundy. Or you could use Burgundy in it but I like the dryness of the Pinot when it cooks down. And I use a half and half mixture of bone-in short ribs and boneless short ribs. You want to leave the meat in big enough chunks that you still taste the meat as an individual flavor. And the marrow in the short ribs adds a nice depth to the slow cook.

    *The recipe serves probably six guys so I usually have lots of leftovers. The first meal I make with red-new potatoes par boiled and finished in the oven basted with and mixture of butter and duck fat. And a clean veg like broccoli. By the second meal, it has developed into a more even flavor and that's when I'll do the Stroganoff. And a lot of recipes for Stroganoff call for mustard which I think is completely wrong. This recipe is Super.

    There's a Beef Bourguignonne recipe at William-Sonoma that sounds good and got rave reviews.

    OK, I've got time for a fuller answer now. And thanks again for the effort of your detailed reply. I can see some real potential with your suggestions.

    I already saw recipes calling for Pinot Noir, a wine I happen to like. And it's part of the Burgundy family. Basting the new reds with butter & duck fat is something I haven't run across yet, but sounds intriguing. I love duck, have sometimes made Duck a l'Orange myself.

    Tuscan beef is known to me, thanks to an Italian husband who loves Tuscan cooking. His favorite TV chefs include Mario Batali (Molto Mario); Ina Garten (the Barefoot Contessa); and Giada De Laurentiis. But even though I've encouraged these culinary interests for years, I'd also like for him to indulge me a little in non-Italian, non-Mediterranean cuisine. My comfort food area being mostly northern European, based on my own ancestry (primarily Dutch, Irish, and Slavic, with a touch of German & French). Although I must admit, like many US Americans, pizza and pasta are also on my comfort food list.

    But for this Beef Burgundy and Beef Stroganoff I'd prefer to stick closer to the originals, as I first knew them nearly 60 years ago. And BTW, adding the sour cream to the Stroganoff at the end as you recommend is what I've read in several recipes.

    In fact, I'm getting so excited I'm thinking more & more about attempting this myself. But cooking in "his" kitchen carries certain risks, not to mention what a demanding food critic he is. Just like when I try to play the piano for an audience, I fear the performance anxiety I may suffer. And while some sour musical notes cost little but my reputation & pride, sour food wastes money and denies him a good meal, the ultimate black mark in his book.

    I only wish I could experiment without him around. Like when I was teaching myself how to make the poached eggs he loves, taking 3 tries before I got it quite right. But breakfast eggs are a lot simpler than these dishes. So that while I have the desire, it may be outweighed by the intimidation.

    In any case, thanks again for your advice. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Rower1950

    Posts: 72

    Jun 30, 2016 3:07 PM GMT
    Julia Child published one of the most detailed and reliable recipes for preparing an authentic French Boeuf Bourguignon. Buy a copy of her first cookbook set, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and watch this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zA2ys8C-lNk
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    Jun 30, 2016 4:36 PM GMT
    Rower1950 saidJulia Child published one of the most detailed and reliable recipes for preparing an authentic French Boeuf Bourguignon. Buy a copy of her first cookbook set, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and watch this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zA2ys8C-lNk

    Thanks, that was fun! There's probably no better source for doing French cooking in an American kitchen than Julia Child. I learned quite a few things. And her recipe, which I believe she said is based on a simple French peasant dish, is somewhat simpler & easier than some of the others I've read online.

    She also didn't use the egg noodles, but rather small potatoes (a chance to try Destin's duck fat suggestion on them). I've had Beef Burgundy both ways, but maybe I'll reserve the noodles for the Stroganoff I also want to do. This encourages me to try making this myself, as a present for the husband, who's got a birthday coming up this month. I can play your video link on my iPad while I'm working, for which I had bought my husband a special kitchen stand for his own iPad. On which I can stop, restart & back-up the show as needed.

    A side note: Child's late-1950s early '60s kitchen is nostalgic for me. Did you notice the matching washing machine & dryer behind her on the left? The kitchen is where we also had ours from the late 1930s until around 1960. When new machines were installed in an especially created laundry room.

    That cooking island was also a novelty in that time period, and I don't know if that was brought in just for her shows (she did many from her own home), or if that was entirely a TV studio set. I suspect a set, since TV cameras were big and clumsy at that time, and GE was one of the sponsors, an opportunity to advertise more of their home appliances. I wondered if the island counter was built higher than normal, since she was as tall as a basketball player.
  • Rower1950

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    Jun 30, 2016 5:06 PM GMT
    The various kitchens Julia used for her TV series were specially designed sets . The camera friendly islands featured bins and shelves on the backsides where she could quickly dispose of items that were no longer needed.

    Her own kitchen, from her house in Cambridge, is now on display in the Smithsonian:

    http://amhistory.si.edu/juliachild/flash_home.asp

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    Jun 30, 2016 6:06 PM GMT
    Rower1950 saidThe various kitchens Julia used for her TV series were specially designed sets . The camera friendly islands featured bins and shelves on the backsides where she could quickly dispose of items that were no longer needed.

    Her own kitchen, from her house in Cambridge, is now on display in the Smithsonian:

    http://amhistory.si.edu/juliachild/flash_home.asp

    I thought at least a few of her programs were done from her home, and in particular that last one in Cambridge. Made possible by smaller TV cameras, with reduced lighting requirements, and improvements to ENG/EFP capabilities (electronic news gathering/electronic field production).

    A possibly interesting related point: those overhead shots were not done with a high-mounted camera, almost impossible when TV cameras were the size of small refrigerators, and mounted on rolling floor pedestals or large tripods. Rather, an angled mirror was positioned above the food prep area, that the "overhead" camera shot up into from the studio floor.
  • Rower1950

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    Jun 30, 2016 9:03 PM GMT
    The last few short series Julia produced, with other cooks showing their work, were recorded on a studio set that looked a lot like her Cambridge kitchen. The set featured an island with a raised work area, instead of the table that occupied the middle of her own kitchen.

    Her enthusiasm for good cooking was infection. She tested her recipes before publishing them. Her shows always provided enough details to produce first rate results, something unheard of on todays so-called cooking shows. Following the directions from her 1966 show on baking croissants and bringing them into my high school French class for breakfast , earned me enough extra credit for an A in the class. Real French Croissants were unheard of in Salt lake City in 1966. Years ago, when I met Julia at a birthday party for my ex, I told her the story. She paused a moment and asked, "How did the Croissants turn out?" She truly wanted to know if her directions worked.
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    Jun 30, 2016 9:54 PM GMT
    Rower1950 saidThe last few short series Julia produced, with other cooks showing their work, were recorded on a studio set that looked a lot like her Cambridge kitchen. The set featured an island with a raised work area, instead of the table that occupied the middle of her own kitchen.

    Her enthusiasm for good cooking was infection. She tested her recipes before publishing them. Her shows always provided enough details to produce first rate results, something unheard of on todays so-called cooking shows. Following the directions from her 1966 show on baking croissants and bringing them into my high school french class for breakfast , earned me enough extra credit for an A in the class. Real French Croissants were unheard of in Salt lake City in 1966. Years ago, when I met Julia at a birthday party for my ex, I told her the story. She paused a moment and asked, "How did the Croissants turn out?" She truly wanted to know if her directions worked.

    Thanks, what a wonderful story! It's evident you know much more Julia Child lore than I do. But then I hate cooking. Yet maybe it's not too late to teach an old dog new tricks, and some new interests. icon_biggrin.gif

    I'm increasingly looking at making the Beef Burgundy myself. Your Julia Child video really makes me think it could be possible for me. With some other suggestions given me here, from Destin and others.

    I told my husband, and he says he may have the same Julia Child cookbook that mentions this dish, among the 200 or so others he has on his office shelves. And he may assist me getting started. But once I get going, I really don't want him looking over my shoulder. We'll have to see how well THAT works out! icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Rower1950

    Posts: 72

    Jul 01, 2016 1:59 AM GMT
    You can do it. Following Julia's video will give you excellent results.

    I hope you have fun doing it. Don't be shy about sampling the wine as you cook.
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    Jul 01, 2016 2:18 AM GMT
    OK, per my last, I looked for a Julia Child cookbook in his library. He thought he had one, but I can't find it. I did find 3 by Mario Batali, about 6 on pasta alone, 3 for cheesecake, an untold number from Southern Living magazine (all bound, not magazines), likewise more than a dozen for Italian cooking, several for chocolate desserts, some Betty Crocker books, by countries like Australia, Thailand, France & others, just a dizzying array. He even has a book on ways to fold dinner napkins in wonderful ways, which I've used myself for years when we have guests over.

    But no Julia Child. Well, there's one of his birthday gifts this month! That I can also enjoy. I tried checking with Barnes & Noble, which is just over 2 miles from us, but suddenly their site shut down, saying their security software had detected "malacious activity". I'll try again tomorrow. I'd rather get it there, or have it shipped there, rather through Amazon. But I appeared they have it in their inventory, before the site went away.
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    Jul 01, 2016 2:19 AM GMT
    Rower1950 saidYou can do it. Following Julia's video will give you excellent results.

    I hope you have fun doing it. Don't be shy about sampling the wine as you cook.

    Well I understand Julia herself did, which became an issue during her later programs.