Why don't Americans like meat pies?

  • Noeton

    Posts: 208

    Jul 01, 2016 3:42 PM GMT
    Here's a meat pie. Not one of those nasty things loaded with veggies from the frozen section of the grocery store. When I was in New Zealand, I ate one practically everyday and loved it. You could buy them everywhere. But you can't find them here and no one seems to eat them. They are delicious and a good source of protein as well. Beef_Mushroom_1.png
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1280

    Jul 01, 2016 3:53 PM GMT
    That looks good, yum! The U.S. has pot pie's at the grocery store, same crust on top, with various meats inside.
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Jul 01, 2016 4:10 PM GMT
    Noeton saidHere's a meat pie. Not one of those nasty things loaded with veggies from the frozen section of the grocery store. When I was in New Zealand, I ate one practically everyday and loved it. You could buy them everywhere. But you can't find them here and no one seems to eat them. They are delicious and a good source of protein as well. Beef_Mushroom_1.png


    I think the British equivalent are called "pasties". Had two on a lark when in England--just as you say, DELICIOUS. They were HOME MADE and were selling at one of the ubiquitous "farmer's markets" in Leicester. Really simple filling "peasant food" and so flavorful.

    There does not seem to be the equivalent in the US for some reason.
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Jul 01, 2016 4:22 PM GMT
    ChicagoSteve saidThat looks good, yum! The U.S. has pot pie's at the grocery store, same crust on top, with various meats inside.


    NOT the same... Pot pies, even Marie Callender's, are noticeably lower in quality. British pasties had an abundance of tasty meat FILLING--not the thickened broth found in pot pies.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jul 01, 2016 4:35 PM GMT
    Empinadas and meat pies are getting somewhat easier to find, thank god. I love them, too. Look for a Jamaican food stand or any Whole Foods-- I was surprised how good the Whole Foods ones were and they have 5 or 6 varieties and not expensive. New Orleans has a local version that is good, too. I'm not sure I agree on how healthy they are but yes, they're healthier than the freezer case processed pot pies put out by evil big food. Still, a lot of empty carbs and fat.
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    Jul 01, 2016 6:53 PM GMT
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    Jul 01, 2016 7:02 PM GMT
    Because everyone buys their ready-made food from the grocery store, frozen. You could make them yourself and freeze them.

    http://www.seriouseats.com/2016/06/how-to-make-a-beautifully-flaky-pie-crust.html
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    Jul 01, 2016 7:09 PM GMT
    FitBlackCuddler said
    Noeton saidHere's a meat pie. Not one of those nasty things loaded with veggies from the frozen section of the grocery store. When I was in New Zealand, I ate one practically everyday and loved it. You could buy them everywhere. But you can't find them here and no one seems to eat them. They are delicious and a good source of protein as well. Beef_Mushroom_1.png


    I think the British equivalent are called "pasties". Had two on a lark when in England--just as you say, DELICIOUS. They were HOME MADE and were selling at one of the ubiquitous "farmer's markets" in Leicester. Really simple filling "peasant food" and so flavorful.

    There does not seem to be the equivalent in the US for some reason.

    No, we have meat pies as well. Also popular in South Africa and Australia ( pie floater anyone?).
    Pasties are a different shape and also contain vegetables.
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    Jul 02, 2016 9:43 AM GMT
    It's not that Americans don't like meat pie. It's Americans don't have much exposure to them. The common ones here are chicken pot pie. But it's not the same as the meat pie OP is referring to.

    Here in LA, there are a few meat pie shops inspired by the ones found in Australia and New Zealand. But it's currently a "foodie" type of thing. Not quite mainstream. Maybe eventually.
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    Jul 02, 2016 2:02 PM GMT
    kew1 said
    Pasties are a different shape and also contain vegetables.


    Indeed. The original Cornish pasty was created as a "convenience food" for Cornish tin and copper miners. The crimped edge made holding the pasty easy, especially with dirty hands (in those days the crimp was discarded). One half of the pasty would be filled with meat and vegetables and the other half with sweet stuff (apple and blackberries).

    Cornish%20Pasty%202.jpg

    cornish-pasty-and-friends-tea-towel-matt
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3386

    Jul 02, 2016 2:30 PM GMT
    Michigan Pasty (Meat Hand Pie)
    http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/recipes/michigan-pasty-meat-hand-pie.html

    When Cornish miners migrated to Michigan's Upper Peninsula in the 1800's, they brought with them their beloved national dish: the pasty. The Finnish miners that followed adopted these meat pies as their own (easily transportable for long subterranean days!), and the pasty became such a large part of the regional culture that there's an annual pasty festival in early July. In this recipe, beef, rutabaga, carrots, onions and potatoes are essentially steamed within the crimped, D-shaped dough pocket that's slit to allow just enough steam to escape.


    cq5dam.web.266.200.jpeg
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    Jul 04, 2016 6:58 PM GMT
    Several years ago before I went to London I was given the usual warning about British food being bland with everything boiled until it was tasteless. Early on we were out and about and I bought a Cornish pasty from a street vendor and as I was eating it I was thinking, "Boy, were they ever right!" because it was filled with corned beef but it was incredibly bland and had just the barest hint of corned beef flavor.
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    Jul 05, 2016 12:20 AM GMT
    I don't know the size of your New Zealand meat pie, it doesn't look hand held, but looks delish, I would try it. Im Polish and was introduced to the Pierogi as a kid, my favorite being the potato and cheese. Although these Polish traditional dumplings did not come with meat filling, they do now apparently, but wouldn't that be more like Ravioli, a traditional Italian pasta. A dumpling (dough) is much heartier than pasta, I have yet to try a ground meat filled one, they are kind of bland and do require seasoning if preferred

    These became so popular, that now I see Pierogi in the frozen section of super markets. My Polish granny made them for years

    Pierogi_z_cebulk%C4%85.jpg

    Pierogi (pronounced /pɪˈroʊgi/ pi-ROH-ghee, in Slovakia pi-ROH-hee),[1] also known as varenyky, are filled dumplings of East European origin.[2][3] They are made by wrapping pockets of unleavened dough around a savory or sweet filling and cooking them in boiling water. These dumplings are popular in Slavic (Polish, Slovak, Ukrainian, Russian), Baltic (Latvian, Lithuanian) and other Eastern European cuisines (such as Romanian) where they are known under local names. Pierogi are especially associated with Poland, Ukraine, Slovakia and Canada where they are considered national dishes.[4][5][6][7]

    Pierogi are often semi-circular but triangular and rectangular ones are also found. Typical fillings include potato, sauerkraut, ground meat, cheese and fruits. The dumplings may be served with toppings, such as melted butter, sour cream or fried onion. The traditional savory method is with onion, and sweet method with sour cream.

    Pierogi may be stuffed (singularly or in combinations) with mashed potatoes, fried onions, quark (sometimes called farmers cheese), cabbage, sauerkraut, meat, mushrooms, spinach, cheese, or other ingredients depending on the cook's preferences. Dessert versions of the dumpling can be stuffed with sweetened quark or with a fresh fruit filling, such as cherry, strawberry, saskatoon berry, raspberry, blueberry, peach, plum, or apple; stoned prunes are sometimes used as well as jam. For more flavor, sour cream can be added to the dough mixture, and this tends to lighten the dough
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    Jul 07, 2016 9:38 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidSeveral years ago before I went to London I was given the usual warning about British food being bland with everything boiled until it was tasteless. Early on we were out and about and I bought a Cornish pasty from a street vendor and as I was eating it I was thinking, "Boy, were they ever right!" because it was filled with corned beef but it was incredibly bland and had just the barest hint of corned beef flavor.


    Corned beef? Sounds like you got an Argentinian pasty.
  • GoodPup

    Posts: 752

    Aug 22, 2016 8:32 AM GMT
    There are a few places popping up around Southern California (LA & Orange County). Which is great cause it's been a staple in my family. When my grandparents moved here from Ireland they opened a meat pie shop till they moved to Australia. But they learned more stuff there before settling back here again.

    So we eat a lot of them. Lol
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Aug 22, 2016 3:16 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidSeveral years ago before I went to London I was given the usual warning about British food being bland with everything boiled until it was tasteless. Early on we were out and about and I bought a Cornish pasty from a street vendor and as I was eating it I was thinking, "Boy, were they ever right!" because it was filled with corned beef but it was incredibly bland and had just the barest hint of corned beef flavor.


    Corned beef? Sounds like you got an Argentinian pasty.

    I was surprised last time I was in London (and Oxford and Windsor and the little town by Stonehenge) that meat pies are getting hard to find. They used to be in every pub and little meat pie shops. Now they're rare and not as good as I remember, almost processed tasting. Is this true or was I just unlucky in looking? I wondered if the consolidation of pubs into the corporate world had done it?
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    Aug 22, 2016 9:32 PM GMT
    For guys who like to bake. Picked up this book at the library. I liked it so I bought it from amazon.

    tumblr_ocbyfdqPKg1rlsa1yo1_500.jpg

    I haven't made anything from it yet, I've been experimenting with making bran crackers.