Canada immigration discriminates worse than US

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 01, 2016 11:20 PM GMT
    I have been checking "moving to Canada" http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/skilled/apply-who-express.asp

    Canada immigration test for express entry discriminates based on 1) Education level obtained 2) Age icon_eek.gif

    Preliminary results indicate that I would not be accepted into Canada's express entry, although the "results" did not indicate the "reasons" for rejection, I have read that prior to 2012, "the age requirement" to migrate into Canada was 49, after that year, they lowered the age to 35. Even though my profession is listed NC code into their Federal Skilled Trades Program, Canada prefers those immigrants with high level degrees, such as doctor, lawyer would have. The country does not recognize the education attainment from other countries, such as USA.

    From what I have read and seen already from the Canadian immigration website, the country of Canada is looking for people with a job lined up, age 35 and younger and a high level of education attainment to "qualify" for express entry. Everyone else must use another method, sounds pretty stuck up when you eliminate 3/4 of possible migrants icon_mad.gificon_confused.gif

    F***Y** Canada, its too cold there anyway icon_rolleyes.gif
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Jul 02, 2016 1:26 AM GMT
    If you're a Muslim, they'll wave you right in. Then you can rape and commit honour [sic] killings all you want.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3521

    Jul 02, 2016 2:21 AM GMT
    if you havent figured it out, all western countries need to replace the babyboomers tax base. so of course they are looking for gen x or less. more baby boomers doesnt help, that would make you part of the problem, not the solution. It isnt discrimination it is ECONOMIC MATH.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 02, 2016 2:48 AM GMT
    Apparition saidif you havent figured it out, all western countries need to replace the babyboomers tax base. so of course they are looking for gen x or less. more baby boomers doesnt help, that would make you part of the problem, not the solution. It isnt discrimination it is ECONOMIC MATH.




    Hardly economic math, people are being penalized for something they have no control over, you cant stop or reverse time, more important, you cant stop aging unless you 'took the potion'. Yes its blatant discrimination, in a now apparent youth driven world, not just the US. In gay men's terms, you are a "daddy" once you turn 30. icon_rolleyes.gif Corporate America in recent years, has been no different, throwing out the experienced, older, higher paid workers for young, do nothing, non-loyal, cheap labor. If young cheap labor is working in US, so goes Canada too, I suppose then it doesn't matter what country, at least North America.

    We can call it the "North American Corporate Wage Cap" (hiring and retaining young workers until a certain age) icon_rolleyes.gif

    With this attitude, what is the point living past 50 then?, the supposed "golden years"?. Was this just a baby boom thing to prepare for your future? I am afraid Canada discriminates, however indirectly, just like todays corporate America and todays LGBT youth does icon_confused.gif

    620agediscriminationinfographic.png




  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 02, 2016 3:08 AM GMT

    The Globe and Mail, Canadian on line news, Canada had once mandatory retirement at 65 (but those older workers now keep working)


    The rise of the older worker – and age-discrimination lawsuits
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/industry-news/the-law-page/the-rise-of-the-older-worker-and-one-type-of-lawsuit/article16316868/


    With mandatory retirement for most workers gone, coupled with a demographic bulge and low returns on fixed-income investments, more older workers are putting off retirement and staying in the work force than ever before. And employment lawyers say they are seeing an increasing number of age-discrimination cases as a result.

    At the same time, Canadian courts are also now more likely to award larger severance amounts to employees, particularly older ones who have less opportunity for new employment. For example, an Ontario court last year awarded a 70-year-old machine operator an additional 22-month severance, or $69,000, after 20 years of work.

    And in 2012, a 72-year-old civil servant in Alberta was given her job back and awarded several years of back pay after winning an age-discrimination case over a move to not renew her contract when she was 67.

    The issue is a legal minefield for employers, says Stuart Rudner, a Toronto employment lawyer with Rudner MacDonald LLP. For example, before mandatory retirement at 65 was eliminated, employers used to be able to allow problem workers to simply retire. Now, they may be tempted to force the issue.

    “It used to be that if you had an older worker that might be slowing down … you would usually let them stay and retire with dignity,” said Mr. Rudner, whose firm acts for both employers and employees in wrongful dismissal cases. “Now the problem is, what do you do?”

    Mr. Rudner warns that employers who approach older workers and start complaining about their performance, or suggesting that they might want to retire, could be asking for trouble.

    “As soon as you say anything …‘You seem to be slowing down,’ even if it relates to age indirectly, you are opening yourself to a human rights claim,” he said. “So you have got to treat this so cautiously.”

    Craig Rix, a partner at management-side employment firm Hicks Morley Hamilton Stewart Storie LLP, said employers need to start consistently applying “performance management” to workers of all ages from the day they are hired, and not just those near the end of their careers.

    But Mr. Rix also says employers should look at older workers – often more reliable, with vast stores of experience, and no child-care issues – as an asset, as certain sectors are set to suffer from labour shortages: “I think there’s a real silver lining there.”

    Susan Eng, the vice-president of advocacy for CARP, the Canadian Association of Retired Persons, said most age-discrimination cases against older workers go unreported and never make it to court or a human-rights tribunal, moves that can require expensive legal assistance and take years.

    “Eliminating mandatory retirement provisions only removed legislated age discrimination,” she said in an e-mail. “It did not remove discriminatory attitudes and practices in the workplace.”

  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Jul 02, 2016 11:35 PM GMT
    ELNathB saidI have been checking "moving to Canada" http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/skilled/apply-who-express.asp

    Canada immigration test for express entry discriminates based on 1) Education level obtained 2) Age icon_eek.gif

    Preliminary results indicate that I would not be accepted into Canada's express entry, although the "results" did not indicate the "reasons" for rejection, I have read that prior to 2012, "the age requirement" to migrate into Canada was 49, after that year, they lowered the age to 35. Even though my profession is listed NC code into their Federal Skilled Trades Program, Canada prefers those immigrants with high level degrees, such as doctor, lawyer would have. The country does not recognize the education attainment from other countries, such as USA.

    From what I have read and seen already from the Canadian immigration website, the country of Canada is looking for people with a job lined up, age 35 and younger and a high level of education attainment to "qualify" for express entry. Everyone else must use another method, sounds pretty stuck up when you eliminate 3/4 of possible migrants icon_mad.gificon_confused.gif

    F***Y** Canada, its too cold there anyway icon_rolleyes.gif


    OP, fuck you. Their country. Their rules.

    You can go eat a dick....just not in Canada.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 03, 2016 4:12 AM GMT
    ELNathB saidI have been checking "moving to Canada" http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/skilled/apply-who-express.asp

    Canada immigration test for express entry discriminates based on 1) Education level obtained 2) Age icon_eek.gif

    Preliminary results indicate that I would not be accepted into Canada's express entry, although the "results" did not indicate the "reasons" for rejection, I have read that prior to 2012, "the age requirement" to migrate into Canada was 49, after that year, they lowered the age to 35. Even though my profession is listed NC code into their Federal Skilled Trades Program, Canada prefers those immigrants with high level degrees, such as doctor, lawyer would have. The country does not recognize the education attainment from other countries, such as USA.

    From what I have read and seen already from the Canadian immigration website, the country of Canada is looking for people with a job lined up, age 35 and younger and a high level of education attainment to "qualify" for express entry. Everyone else must use another method, sounds pretty stuck up when you eliminate 3/4 of possible migrants icon_mad.gificon_confused.gif

    F***Y** Canada, its too cold there anyway icon_rolleyes.gif

    You should check other countries. They all have weird fine print and restrictions.
  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Jul 03, 2016 12:24 PM GMT
    Honor [sic] it's called English motherfucker. You're spelling it wrong. icon_wink.gif