Article: LGBT Discrimination In Health Care: Heterosexual Providers Found To Hold Bias On Sexual Orientation-- I experienced this at Aetna

  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 22, 2016 3:04 AM GMT
    I personally experienced this from Aertna. I feel like my civil rights have been violated and their policies and coverage are based on heterosexual standards and there are also double standards with a bias toward heterosexual women. Here is the article.

    LGBT Discrimination In Health Care: Heterosexual Providers Found To Hold Bias On Sexual Orientation
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    Jul 22, 2016 3:20 AM GMT
    It's Aetna, and that link is a fail. Did they deny you free PrEP or something?
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 22, 2016 3:23 AM GMT
    OK link is working. I don't know what happened but edited the HTML link.
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    Jul 22, 2016 3:34 AM GMT
    The title focuses on LGBT discrimination, but the article states gay and lesbian health care providers are also biased:

    "Unsurprisingly, heterosexual health care providers showed moderate to strong implicit preferences for heterosexual patients. Interestingly enough, the same result was found in lesbian and gay health care providers who also displayed both implicit and explicit preferences to treat lesbian and gay patients. "

    Find a homo doctor. problem solved. icon_biggrin.gif
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 22, 2016 3:54 AM GMT
    Here is an article where Obama administration is addressing LGBT discrimination in the Affordable Care Act. http://www.washingtonblade.com/2016/05/13/hhs-makes-final-rule-prohibiting-anti-trans-bias-in-health-care/. I don't really understand the first article since it does not address health care as a whole including biases with insurance along with health care providers, but you can always change your doctor. A gay doctor is not always available but may be best for some. I think though that healthcare across the whole spectrum needs to be explored, not just doctors but appears that the Obama has done something recently about LGBT discrimination in health coverage but I am sure that has not been enforced yet since it was a couple months ago.
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    Jul 22, 2016 10:43 PM GMT
    CODY4U saidThe title focuses on LGBT discrimination, but the article states gay and lesbian health care providers are also biased:

    "Unsurprisingly, heterosexual health care providers showed moderate to strong implicit preferences for heterosexual patients. Interestingly enough, the same result was found in lesbian and gay health care providers who also displayed both implicit and explicit preferences to treat lesbian and gay patients. "

    Find a homo doctor. problem solved. icon_biggrin.gif


    I agree with Cody - but with one correction...Find a MALE homo doctor. problem solved. Women doctors will never understand males issues no matter how much they say they will nor they have the plumbing. I had to drop a female doctor specialist since she was not listening to my issue and problems.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 23, 2016 1:53 AM GMT
    uombroca said
    CODY4U saidThe title focuses on LGBT discrimination, but the article states gay and lesbian health care providers are also biased:

    "Unsurprisingly, heterosexual health care providers showed moderate to strong implicit preferences for heterosexual patients. Interestingly enough, the same result was found in lesbian and gay health care providers who also displayed both implicit and explicit preferences to treat lesbian and gay patients. "

    Find a homo doctor. problem solved. icon_biggrin.gif


    I agree with Cody - but with one correction...Find a MALE homo doctor. problem solved. Women doctors will never understand males issues no matter how much they say they will nor they have the plumbing. I had to drop a female doctor specialist since she was not listening to my issue and problems.


    I would only allow a female to touch me above the neck. I have been to female dentists at that is. As far as a primary care provider, I would never go to a female. Bad enough that insurance companies and front desks are full of straight women. Gay male doctor with an all gay staff would definitely be best but unfortunately that doesn't eliminate the straight bias with insurance especially biased toward straight women..
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    Jul 23, 2016 4:20 AM GMT
    I too, agree with Cody. My company chose Cigna for our coverage, and it's a very good and comprehensive plan. I pretty much was done with my primary GP about 2 years ago, being a Vietnamese lady, she didn't quite understand "gay." Now, my primary GP is in Dallas, and he laughs at the fact that I fly up and back for my doctor visits. He's a very good doctor, and is in Cigna's PPO network.

    Cheers,

    Sean
  • interesting

    Posts: 573

    Jul 23, 2016 4:29 AM GMT
    Do you have insurance through employer or through the marketplace/your own plan via the company? I have the latter, and oh it sucks oh so much! But now the school I'm attending requires me to be on their insurance plan, so technically, they are my employer, and it is much better coverage! Yeah I have Aetna too, so is my Dad, but he goes through his employer, and his coverage is wonderful, it covers almost every single damn thing.

    But I do see what you're saying though, I know in the medical field, they have classes and train the professionals in cultural sensitivity, but then ignore everyone else that doesn't fit that mold.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 23, 2016 4:45 AM GMT
    Yeh, I went through Healthcare.gov and yes, it sucks. I guess it is one of the perks of working for a large company is they sometimes give you good coverage. I am really surprised all the gay men choosing female doctors. I would never allow a woman, any woman to touch me below the belt. I know someone who gets their healthcare from Independence Blue Cross and their employer even pays their deductible and other stuff so they get better than a Platinum plan for the price of a Bronze plan. Their coverage is good as well. I wonder why it is like that though.

    it was explained to me through a healthcare provider once that If a health insurance company can deny you coverage for any reason at all, they will. They don't care if it is discriminatory. I simply don't understand how the same company can be better through an employer. What I am thinking is, denial of coverage is easier to an individual. Some complaints by some employees at large company may cause the health insurance company to lose thousands of plans instead of just one.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 23, 2016 5:45 AM GMT
    Hi Buddycat!

    The way it was explained to me by my Human Resources Department is that when individuals go through a large corporation for their coverage, even though the Aetna's and Cigna's give the companies "bulk pricing," the company still eats the majority of it. For example... My health benefits cost me $70 a pay period for a fully comprehensive plan... Single, healthy male, 38 years old, not married, no kids. In addition to my $140 a month, the company would pay Cigna another $250 for me per month, totalling almost $400 a month. So all in all, I guess it would be similar as if I had gone to the marketplace and chosen one of these $400/$500 plans a month. Or maybe not?

    Truth is, these providers look the other way with major corporations because there is a risk that the company may decide to take all of their business to another provider. I've been with my company 8 years now, and in that time, we went from Aetna to Blue Cross, then to Cigna. So take 9,000 US employee plans + spouses + children/dependants, and yes, they will look the other way on certain things. Someone choosing an individual plan I'm thinking it's easier to deny coverage, because it's just one policy at risk. Makes sense? (It's late.) icon_sad.gif

    Cheers,

    Sean
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 23, 2016 6:13 AM GMT
    GTPSean saidHi Buddycat!

    The way it was explained to me by my Human Resources Department is that when individuals go through a large corporation for their coverage, even though the Aetna's and Cigna's give the companies "bulk pricing," the company still eats the majority of it. For example... My health benefits cost me $70 a pay period for a fully comprehensive plan... Single, healthy male, 38 years old, not married, no kids. In addition to my $140 a month, the company would pay Cigna another $250 for me per month, totalling almost $400 a month. So all in all, I guess it would be similar as if I had gone to the marketplace and chosen one of these $400/$500 plans a month. Or maybe not?

    Truth is, these providers look the other way with major corporations because there is a risk that the company may decide to take all of their business to another provider. I've been with my company 8 years now, and in that time, we went from Aetna to Blue Cross, then to Cigna. So take 9,000 US employee plans + spouses + children/dependants, and yes, they will look the other way on certain things. Someone choosing an individual plan I'm thinking it's easier to deny coverage, because it's just one policy at risk. Makes sense? (It's late.) icon_sad.gif

    Cheers,

    Sean


    Perhaps even better than a $400/$500 plan since they get a group discount. I agree, the health insurance company runs the risk of a large company simply going to another provider. I also agree, it is simply easier to deny coverage with an individual plan, so the will. Doesn't matter to them if it is discriminatory but I see in the one article Obama recently made steps to stop discrimination against LGBT people in healthcare. Since your company switched to three different providers, perhaps there were issues and took there 9000+++ plans elsewhere.
    This makes sense so.
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    Jul 23, 2016 11:26 AM GMT
    Not something one has experienced in this Great Southern Land, Oz.
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Jul 23, 2016 1:47 PM GMT
    Finding a gay MD is not always easy or possible. Also I work for the Adventist health system. I can tell you that unless you by chance to be in the ER with a gay MD, count yourself lucky. It's quite possible your nurse is not. I have seen and heard a number of disturbing things, none of which are illegal, but definitely not ethical. I would not send any of my gay friends or family to there. My husband had to go through the MD provided by his insurance recently. Ended having to report him for violation of the ACA. Told him he needed to associate with more straight people and he had too many gay friends. He had asked for a gay MD but was told none were listed with his companies insurance. So instead they gave him a bigoted idiot.
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    Jul 23, 2016 4:55 PM GMT
    I've been to the ER before. No one asked me what my sexual preference was. Ever. They just helped me. This seems like an issue that really isn't an issue, but the folks that love to have an issue want to make it an issue so they can have another issue.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 23, 2016 6:29 PM GMT
    CODY4U saidI've been to the ER before. No one asked me what my sexual preference was. Ever. They just helped me. This seems like an issue that really isn't an issue, but the folks that love to have an issue want to make it an issue so they can have another issue.


    I don't know about ERs, obviously the nurse works in one and never encountered one but you were the one that suggested a gay doctor and he was just talking about how that is not always available and his spouses experience with discrimination. Sometimes there really is an issue.
  • Tawrich

    Posts: 65

    Jul 24, 2016 4:27 PM GMT
    The posted article is about a pretty shitty study imo. They showed no connection between "implicit" preference and quality of care provided and the authors themselves report that there was no explicit preference. If you look up the study the article the implicit preference they found for physicians was 1.3 times higher which is barely anything. That's like saying it's a problem that a heterosexual run clinic has 13 heterosexual patients but only 10 homosexual patients. Such a finding normally wouldn't even be reported except for the fact that the study looked at over 10 thousand healthcare providers which is an insane number.
  • Tawrich

    Posts: 65

    Jul 24, 2016 4:39 PM GMT
    Also guys be careful choosing doctors solely on their orientation. Some are really out there to serve their community (and for a doctor in certain places that's actually a pretty significant personal sacrifice as there aren't that many gay patients and the medical community prohibits dating/sex with patients so you don't have much of a market and you doom your personal life) which is fantastic but some are simply bad docs who seek to profit on the community's fear of the medical establishment. Here's a fascinating article on Dr. Ramon Torres who I think really embodies this dichotomy between really caring for our community and ultimately increasingly flimsy ethics: http://nymag.com/news/features/45785/index5.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 24, 2016 7:22 PM GMT
    I had a female Dr. in San Diego. She was an HIV specialist through Kaiser-Permanente. She was terrific! So was the male NP.


    32% of doctors don't even know what PrEP is. "However, the CDC study states that many primary care doctors -- one in three -- are not even aware of PrEP, leaving many who could benefit from taking PrEP untreated."

    http://www.hlntv.com/shows/dr-drew/articles/2015/11/30/60-times-more-people-should-be-prep-ing-for-hiv-says-cdc

    I've had a stupid Gay doctor. He said, without a blood test, I needed to cut down on drinking......very presumptuous! Just because I was a bartender. I still have totally normal kidney and liver functions 30 years later. Worse he said I had 2-3 years to live because of HIV. I fired him immediately. Your doctor needs to be on your side, with the same plan. YOU are your own best advocate. I found another doctor who was truly an AIDS specialist, not just a GP pretending to be.
    And THRIVE (K-P's tag line) I have! LOL

    My current K-P Dr. is Oscar, he is straight (I don't know for sure). But he is a specialist for all things Gay/HIV in the desert. I really LIKE him. You can move around within the system. You are not stuck with a Doctor.

    To me it doesn't matter if the Doctor is gay or straight, male or female. You have to look at their body of knowledge and experience. I understand some aren't comfortable with a straight woman Dr. but that's your discomfort. If she is a good doctor and professional it doesn't matter, even for below the belt issues.
  • interesting

    Posts: 573

    Jul 25, 2016 2:54 AM GMT
    buddycat saidYeh, I went through Healthcare.gov and yes, it sucks. I guess it is one of the perks of working for a large company is they sometimes give you good coverage. I am really surprised all the gay men choosing female doctors. I would never allow a woman, any woman to touch me below the belt. I know someone who gets their healthcare from Independence Blue Cross and their employer even pays their deductible and other stuff so they get better than a Platinum plan for the price of a Bronze plan. Their coverage is good as well. I wonder why it is like that though.


    See, I'm the same way, I feel like a prude because I know it really doesn't matter, but in my head, I just feel it's easier if I get touched by a man (I feel like there should be a joke here) because he has the same parts I have. I actually would love to find myself a gay doctor (also to marry) just because I can be open and have dialogue with him without fearing that he'll curl up and become tense if the subject of gay men's health ever come up.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 25, 2016 5:42 AM GMT
    Tawrich saidThe posted article is about a pretty shitty study imo. They showed no connection between "implicit" preference and quality of care provided and the authors themselves report that there was no explicit preference. If you look up the study the article the implicit preference they found for physicians was 1.3 times higher which is barely anything. That's like saying it's a problem that a heterosexual run clinic has 13 heterosexual patients but only 10 homosexual patients. Such a finding normally wouldn't even be reported except for the fact that the study looked at over 10 thousand healthcare providers which is an insane number.


    I agree that the first study was not comprehensive enough. A more comprehensive study would have to include anything from healthcare insurance, doctors, and any other healthcare related institution.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jul 25, 2016 7:22 PM GMT
    interesting said
    buddycat saidYeh, I went through Healthcare.gov and yes, it sucks. I guess it is one of the perks of working for a large company is they sometimes give you good coverage. I am really surprised all the gay men choosing female doctors. I would never allow a woman, any woman to touch me below the belt. I know someone who gets their healthcare from Independence Blue Cross and their employer even pays their deductible and other stuff so they get better than a Platinum plan for the price of a Bronze plan. Their coverage is good as well. I wonder why it is like that though.


    See, I'm the same way, I feel like a prude because I know it really doesn't matter, but in my head, I just feel it's easier if I get touched by a man (I feel like there should be a joke here) because he has the same parts I have. I actually would love to find myself a gay doctor (also to marry) just because I can be open and have dialogue with him without fearing that he'll curl up and become tense if the subject of gay men's health ever come up.


    Careful what you wish for, share the wrong thing and he want to check your butticon_redface.gif. He was cute too and quite fine with it.
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Jul 28, 2016 6:56 PM GMT
    CODY4U saidI've been to the ER before. No one asked me what my sexual preference was. Ever. They just helped me. This seems like an issue that really isn't an issue, but the folks that love to have an issue want to make it an issue so they can have another issue.


    Your completely off base. I wasn't trying to make an issue that didn't exist. No, they don't ask what your sexual preference is. However for those that are more open it is an issue. Especially with providers who have an, issue with gay or transgenders. The Er won't refuse you care, but it does affect care wether we want it to or not. I've seen, and experienced it.