Most Of Us Are Blissfully Ignorant About How Much Rancid Olive Oil We Use

  • metta

    Posts: 39169

    Jul 27, 2016 7:28 PM GMT
    Most Of Us Are Blissfully Ignorant About How Much Rancid Olive Oil We Use

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/most-of-us-are-blissfully-ignorant-about-how-much-rancid-olive-oil-we-use/?ex_cid=538fb
  • leanandclean

    Posts: 281

    Jul 27, 2016 9:35 PM GMT
    Plus I hear that some of it is not really olive oil but other kinds with false labels.
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    Jul 27, 2016 9:58 PM GMT
    Yeah. Most buy olive oil for the first time after reading about all the health benefits...and then they taste it and it's like, "Ewwww....that's nasty. No way that can be good for you." Lol. First time I bought some that was exactly what I said, "that shit is rancid."
  • Nakedman1969

    Posts: 247

    Jul 27, 2016 10:14 PM GMT
    Give that job to Rachel Ray she can get enough of that stuff. She can tell you if its bad or good.
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    Jul 27, 2016 11:38 PM GMT
    In our house my husband has that job of selecting oil. Being entirely Italian & Sicilian, he was raised on olive oil, imported direct from Italy. When it was a rarity in US markets, and hardly used outside the Italian community. He knows the good from the bad.

    My late partner, half-Italian and also a wonderful chef, really got me into the benefits of olive oil. Compared to the awful cooking oils & lard in use when I was a kid, and some still popular today. Turns out the Italians had it right all along for many cooking purposes.

    I told my husband about this article (and thanks metta), and he says he'd know the quality difference. And chooses brands he believes he can trust. Pure Italian olive oil (of course the labeling could be deceptive), he avoids Greek and Spanish. Whether he can really taste the difference I wouldn't be the one able to judge, and I know he is terribly prejudiced for all things Italian, especially regarding anything for consumption.

    He actually has Italian wines imported directly to our home by the box, especially reds from his father's home province of Abruzzo. I mean, this is how fanatical he is. So knowing a good olive oil is right up his alley.
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    Jul 28, 2016 3:34 AM GMT
    I stopped using olive oil years ago and now only use coconut oil.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jul 28, 2016 4:56 PM GMT
    I wonder if buying "House" brands from Whole Foods or Fresh Market would help. They seem to be pretty careful to source the foods they put their private label on. Or so I hear.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jul 28, 2016 4:58 PM GMT
    Radd saidI stopped using olive oil years ago and now only use coconut oil.

    I'm not a fan of the flavor of coconut milk so haven't tried the oil. Does it have the flavor or is it neutral? High or low burn point?
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    Jul 28, 2016 5:19 PM GMT
    I found the following guidance online. The focus is on a low-cholesterol diet:

    Cholesterol research indicates that diets high in omega-3 fats and monounsaturated "good fats" can help lower your cholesterol. You will find these beneficial fats in avocado oil, canola oil, flaxseed oil, olive oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil and walnut oil.

    Tip: Omega-3 and monounsaturated "good fats" can provide the antioxidants vitamin E and selenium. In addition to helping to lower cholesterol, good fats appear to aid in the promotion of healthy blood pressure, improve normal blood clotting, and reduce inflammation. In fact, omega-3s are a unique form of nutrient known as "essential," meaning that you must obtain them from food or a supplement pill. Your body cannot make the nutrient from other fats, carbohydrates, or proteins. Omega-3s are not very common in the foods we eat, and are mostly found in fish and seafood.

    Oils to Avoid
    Hydrogenated oils are oils that are processed by manufacturers in order to prolong their shelf-life. Unfortunately, the hydrogenation process can create harmful trans fats.

    When cooking at home, avoid palm and processed/hydrogenated coconut oil, which are high in saturated fat.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jul 28, 2016 5:32 PM GMT
    I've also heard that while some oils are better for you than others, all the distinctions cease when used for cooking. Olive oil in your salad is good vs corn oil but meaningless when used for frying. Anyone else heard this?
  • metta

    Posts: 39169

    Jul 28, 2016 7:11 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    Radd saidI stopped using olive oil years ago and now only use coconut oil.

    I'm not a fan of the flavor of coconut milk so haven't tried the oil. Does it have the flavor or is it neutral? High or low burn point?



    It is not neutral. I like the smell of it and the taste. You may want to pick a little up and try it to see if you like it. You can find the organic coconut oil all over the place. I would not put it in everything.
  • trvlmscl

    Posts: 136

    Jul 29, 2016 3:26 AM GMT
    Your oil selection for a particular dish should also be within range of its smoke point. Ie you can't sear a steak (at proper temp) with olive oil as oil is turns bad for you (carcinogenic) if used past its smoke point (350 for EVOO).
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    Jul 29, 2016 1:56 PM GMT
    Destinharbor saidI've also heard that while some oils are better for you than others, all the distinctions cease when used for cooking. Olive oil in your salad is good vs corn oil but meaningless when used for frying. Anyone else heard this?

    Not necessarily "meaningless", because there are subtle differences in taste between oils. And tolerance to heat is a big factor.

    But largely a moot point for us, since for health reasons (most importantly his following heart surgery, but mine as well) we try to fry little. Even fried eggs at home are done on a dry frying pan, except for a coating of cholesterol-free spray Pam. We don't eat fried restaurant food, try to get many items alternately grilled.

    That's another reason we like to patronize places that accommodate us, with staff we know. Often they'll have some breaded fish item on the menu, meaning it's gonna be fried, often deep fried, but for us they'll grill it instead, off-menu. Assuming it's a fish type that's suitable for grilling. Same with other foods.
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    Jul 29, 2016 3:04 PM GMT
    These days I mostly use coconut oil. Olive oil is mainly for finishing, or using over top of something, and I research brands that have been tested so I know I'm getting my monies worth. I go through that because I NEVER use vegetable oils! So to find out my bottle of olive oil is really filled with canola oil would piss me right off.
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    Jul 29, 2016 8:42 PM GMT
    Radd saidI stopped using olive oil years ago and now only use coconut oil.


    Cue rancid coconut oil thread.

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    Jul 29, 2016 9:04 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    Radd saidI stopped using olive oil years ago and now only use coconut oil.


    Cue rancid coconut oil thread.

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    And cue high cholesterol cocoanut oil thread.
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    Jul 31, 2016 12:36 AM GMT
    Try Kalamata olive oil from Greece. It's one of the best, and you can find a huge bottle at Trader Joe's for less than $10. Greece, by the way, grows the best olives in my personal opinion.
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    Jul 31, 2016 12:56 AM GMT
    WestCoastJock said
    But what should the rest of us do that can't afford the Italian olive oil? It is more expensive than the other ones. Many of us do not have the deep pockets that you do to be able to have wines imported by the box from Italy.

    I wasn't aware that Italian olive oil is more expensive than others from Europe. As for the imported wine, it's really very inexpensive. The whole shipment usually costs us much less than $10 a bottle.

    When he sees the "Abruzzo" on the bottles from the province where his father was born he actually sheds tears. That alone is worth the money to me. Plus they often include a little "gift". Sometimes it's a wine bottle carrier, sometimes some decorative pasta bowls, or some other thing. We never know.

    When we see the international number on our caller ID we can assume it's them in Italy, with some new offer. For well under $200 we get a lovely selection, enough to fill our wine cabinet for months. Shipped through their local distributor here, to satisfy US Customs requirements. The only stipulation is that we must be here in person to receive it (via UPS or FedEx), since it's alcohol.

    If anyone would like the contact info I'd be glad to provide it.
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    Aug 01, 2016 10:16 PM GMT
    leanandclean saidPlus I hear that some of it is not really olive oil but other kinds with false labels.


    Speaking of false labels, it seems "WestCoastJock" has a false label or two of his own. Google his image (the right way round) and (as if you hadn't already guessed) he's just another sock puppet sent to sow a little Dem discord and pester Art_Deco. I wonder who that could be.

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